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Old 03-30-2018, 05:26 AM
 
5,081 posts, read 3,970,810 times
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Is it called a family care plan?

Single and military married to military parents had to have this and it was reviewed yearly.

Had to have a designated person that would stand in as a guardian if the parent/parents had to deploy or whatever.
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Old 03-30-2018, 07:04 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,088 posts, read 8,889,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Okay. "Almost three years now." Fercryingoutloud.

Is it still necessary to identify the specifics of who will take care of the child in short and long-term separations?

If so, then you're wrong about my statement being "totally false."
I didn't mean to sound rude. As a recruiter, we lose a lot of potential applicants because they think they can't apply, so I like to try to get the correct info out there so we don't lose applicant. In those three years I've put dozens of applicants in as single parents. Yes, they have to find someone to care for their child during basic and training, but that's the only restriction we have.
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Old 03-30-2018, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 303Guy View Post
What does the US military do with young female soldiers serving in Afghanistan or anywhere else for that matter, when the woman has a young child?

Deployment support for families is available through Marine Corps Family Team Building, and the Exceptional Family Member Program is helpful to families with special needs children. The New Parent Support Program offers home visitors who can help parents adjust to life with a new baby. Marine and Family Services also offers services such as relocation assistance and financial advice to help Marines ensure they have a sound home over their heads.

So if you become a single parent when in the Marine Corps at least, The Marine Corps has many program to help you.

But you must give up legal custody (by court order) of their child(ren), and then wait one year or more before being eligible for enlistment. (in Marine Corps at least.)


https://www.thebalance.com/us-milita...arents-3354014
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Old 03-30-2018, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
30,827 posts, read 17,564,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
I didn't mean to sound rude. As a recruiter, we lose a lot of potential applicants because they think they can't apply, so I like to try to get the correct info out there so we don't lose applicant. In those three years I've put dozens of applicants in as single parents. Yes, they have to find someone to care for their child during basic and training, but that's the only restriction we have.
I don't think that poster said contradicting things.

According to this article,

In the Army and Air Force, single-parent military applicants for enlistment must indicate they have a child or children in the custody of the other parent or another adult. They are then advised and required to acknowledge by certification that their intent at the time of enlistment was not to enter the Air Force or Army with the express intention of regaining custody after enlistment.

if the other parent assumes full custody, the applicant is usually qualified for enlistment.

https://www.thebalance.com/us-milita...arents-3354014

The single parent CANNOT have custody of their children BEFORE enlisting. They can only enlist if they don't have full custody of their children.

Another article

A. The bottom line is that single parents with custody can't enlist. DoD Insruction 1304.26 states the “The Military Services may not enlist …unmarried individuals with custody of any dependents under the age of 18.” ... This is a non-waiverable requirement, so there is no such thing as a 'custody waiver.'”

https://www.google.com/search?source....0.7a_lVscl3mk

You made it sound like as long as they found somebody to care for their children, they can enlist. No, it is not like that. You gave an over simplified answer which is not necessarily the whole picture. Babysitting and custody are two completely different things.

If a single parent has custody of the child(ren), they cannot enlist. If they BECOME a single parent while in service, that is a different scenario.

Last edited by lilyflower3191981; 03-30-2018 at 08:46 AM..
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
30,827 posts, read 17,564,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
We (Air Force) has been taking Single Parents for almost 3 years for new enlistments. You do not have to give up legal guardianship. If you give up guardianship that actually makes someone ineligible, for the Air Force at least.
Are you sure about that?

Perhaps you meant one can’t just give away custody temporarily and then regain custody
later on?

If so, then you are right.

But, The transfer of custody must be permanent. Meaning you cannot temporarily gave your custody to your children's care giver. The transfer of custody has to be PERMANENT.

Actually this chart (bottom picture) explains the situation clearly.

All you have to do is to look at this picture

https://www.americanbar.org/content/...thcheckdam.pdf
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Old 03-30-2018, 04:36 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,088 posts, read 8,889,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
I don't think that poster said contradicting things.

According to this article,

In the Army and Air Force, single-parent military applicants for enlistment must indicate they have a child or children in the custody of the other parent or another adult. They are then advised and required to acknowledge by certification that their intent at the time of enlistment was not to enter the Air Force or Army with the express intention of regaining custody after enlistment.

if the other parent assumes full custody, the applicant is usually qualified for enlistment.

https://www.thebalance.com/us-milita...arents-3354014

The single parent CANNOT have custody of their children BEFORE enlisting. They can only enlist if they don't have full custody of their children.

Another article

A. The bottom line is that single parents with custody can't enlist. DoD Insruction 1304.26 states the “The Military Services may not enlist …unmarried individuals with custody of any dependents under the age of 18.” ... This is a non-waiverable requirement, so there is no such thing as a 'custody waiver.'”

https://www.google.com/search?source....0.7a_lVscl3mk

You made it sound like as long as they found somebody to care for their children, they can enlist. No, it is not like that. You gave an over simplified answer which is not necessarily the whole picture. Babysitting and custody are two completely different things.

If a single parent has custody of the child(ren), they cannot enlist. If they BECOME a single parent while in service, that is a different scenario.
The Balance information is WRONG. They don't have an intimate knowledge of our regulations and they don't have up to date information. This is a not a credible source. You CAN join the Air Force as a single parent. If you give-up custody to join, you are BANNED from joining. If someone ALREADY has custody of your kids (like you gave them up for adoption 10 years ago, but not in order to join) you can still apply, but you must certify that you did not give them up in order to join.

I 100% assure you that as a CURRENT Air Force recruiting supervisor, I put in two single parents last month, and probably 10 in the last year. All of them CURRENTLY had custody of their children, and they just had to put in writing that dad, or a grandparent, or an aunt, or whoever, would care for their child. Once they are through technical training, the child will be with them again.

I don't know who maintains the website "the balance" or how to get it updated, but I can assure you that it is not accurate. Single parents USED to be barred from entering the Air Force, but that changed around 3 years ago. Apparently, random websites that are not affiliated with the Air Force have not all gotten the memo about the change.
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Old 03-30-2018, 04:43 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,088 posts, read 8,889,970 times
Reputation: 4466
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
Are you sure about that?

Perhaps you meant one can’t just give away custody temporarily and then regain custody
later on?

If so, then you are right.

But, The transfer of custody must be permanent. Meaning you cannot temporarily gave your custody to your children's care giver. The transfer of custody has to be PERMANENT.

Actually this chart (bottom picture) explains the situation clearly.

All you have to do is to look at this picture

https://www.americanbar.org/content/...thcheckdam.pdf
Yes I am sure. In your article, click on the link to the Air Force regulation. It doesn't work. You get an error that the regulation can't be found... why, because it doesn't exist any more. The regulation has been completely repealed and is no longer enforced and the rules have changed. Your link is out of date and provides OLD information.

Any person that permanently gives up custody of their children for the purpose of joining is BARRED from joining. They are ineligible for enlistment. You can give someone who is caring for your child a power of attorney, but you can't not give up your child per our current regulations (or the old one you posted). Our current regulations are not published online, and I can't paste an attachment, but I can assure you that I know what I'm talking about. I'm a current recruiting supervisor and I live this daily.

However, even the link you provided state "For another example, look at the Air Force instruction –
Transferring custody of family members for the purpose of entering the Air Force
is prohibited and renders the enlisted programs applicant permanently
disqualified. "

So, do you understand, that if you give up custody of your family member you are now permanently disqualified? This hasn't changed.

What has changed is that we allow single parents to join as long as they have a family care plan (vs having given up custody).

Please stop posting invalid information. If a single parent is here looking for info, I do not want them to think that they can't join. They can. I can literally put them in the Air Force and ship them to basic training. I have done this regularly for the last three years. Call any Air Force recruiting office in the world and ask the question.
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Old 03-30-2018, 04:48 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,088 posts, read 8,889,970 times
Reputation: 4466
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
I don't think that poster said contradicting things.


You made it sound like as long as they found somebody to care for their children, they can enlist. No, it is not like that. You gave an over simplified answer which is not necessarily the whole picture. Babysitting and custody are two completely different things.

.
I just want to reiterate for any single parents looking at this threat that it IS that simple. You provide us with something called a "Family care plan" that is literally TWO pieces of paper that says who will care for your child while you are in basic. There is ZERO transfer of custody. We advise you to get a power of attorney so that the caregiver can get medical care if needed, but we do not even require that.

Recruiter "You're a single parent? Please fill out this form showing who is going to care for your child until you graduate training..."
Applicant "OK, here is my form"
Recruiter- "Awesome, good to go! Now you can join."

That easy.

If you give up "Custody," like with a judge and a court order, you do not get to enlist. Done. Disqualified, unless this is something you already did, in the past, for a reason OTHER than enlistment. If you had a kid at 15 years old and gave up custody because you couldn't care for the kid, you can still apply for a waiver to join. You can NOT give up custody for the purpose of joining. It has created too many problems with Active Duty members having to go to court to try to get custody back, so we don't allow it.
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Old 03-30-2018, 04:54 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,088 posts, read 8,889,970 times
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Here is the news release from when the Air Force started allowing single parents to join, I didn't realize, it has actually been 5 years!!
Policy changes ease enlisting with families > U.S. Air Force > Article Display

Here is a quote from www.airforce.com, vs a third party website:
"Can I give up custody of my dependents to enlist in the Air Force?
The Air Force recognizes that some individuals, for personal reasons, have given up custody of a child or children. It is not the intent or desire of the Air Force to require any person to relinquish custody of his/her children to qualify for enlistment. Transferring custody of family members for the purpose of entering the Air Force is prohibited, and renders enlisted applicants “permanently disqualified.”
From: https://www.airforce.com/frequently-...-the-air-force

Also from www.airforce.com (vs a third party website)
"Can I join the Air Force if I have children?
Provided you are otherwise qualified, you may enlist if you are married and have legal, physical custody of up to two children who are under age 18 and incapable of self-care. You will need a waiver to enlist if:
• You are married and have three children under age 18 who are incapable of self-care.
• If you are a single parent (whether separated, divorced or common-law partner) with legal, physical custody of up to three children under 18 who are incapable of self-care.
For more information and guidance regarding your situation, contact your local recruiter."
The waiver consists of the "family care plan" I was talking about, and is extremely easy to get.
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Old 03-30-2018, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
30,827 posts, read 17,564,656 times
Reputation: 11871
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
The Balance information is WRONG. They don't have an intimate knowledge of our regulations and they don't have up to date information. This is a not a credible source. You CAN join the Air Force as a single parent. If you give-up custody to join, you are BANNED from joining. If someone ALREADY has custody of your kids (like you gave them up for adoption 10 years ago, but not in order to join) you can still apply, but you must certify that you did not give them up in order to join.

I 100% assure you that as a CURRENT Air Force recruiting supervisor, I put in two single parents last month, and probably 10 in the last year. All of them CURRENTLY had custody of their children, and they just had to put in writing that dad, or a grandparent, or an aunt, or whoever, would care for their child. Once they are through technical training, the child will be with them again.

I don't know who maintains the website "the balance" or how to get it updated, but I can assure you that it is not accurate. Single parents USED to be barred from entering the Air Force, but that changed around 3 years ago. Apparently, random websites that are not affiliated with the Air Force have not all gotten the memo about the change.
Then maybe talk to the owner of the site if you think they are wrong.
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