U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-27-2018, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,636 posts, read 4,352,639 times
Reputation: 5836

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
Most military people in their 40's are eligible for retirement and won't need separation pay.

No one can stay in the military forever. Whether you're an E1 or O10 you will get out one day and “lose your job.”

The 9 year E5 who decides to get out after his enlistment, gets no separation pay. The 9 year E5 who gets an article 15 and loses rank, will hit high year tenure, get an honorable discharge, and separation pay. That’s called a reward.
what if I told you that all NCO's can if allowed serve until age 60 and warrant officers can go to age 62. I served until I was 58 and a half.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-27-2018, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
3,282 posts, read 782,009 times
Reputation: 4707
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsoldier1976 View Post
what if I told you that all NCO's can if allowed serve until age 60 and warrant officers can go to age 62. I served until I was 58 and a half.
That's 100% irrelevant.

1. You have to be allowed to do that, many people will be denied.
2. Many enlisted folks are still eligible for retirement in theirs 40s

This thread is largely about enlisted high year tenure. My point is that if someone gets demoted by article 15 into high year tenure, they are essentially being "rewarded" with an honorable discharge and separation pay as opposed to a person who simply finishes their enlistment. That was my only point.

I have no idea what your point is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2018, 07:56 PM
 
17,245 posts, read 9,381,933 times
Reputation: 16520
This is known as the "High Year of Tenure" (HYT). The Army High Year of Tenure program is called the Retention Control Point

As long as you are not neglecting your duties, been in serious trouble, an enlisted person with more than six years of service and less than 20 years of service (retirement eligible) who is involuntarily separated (under honorable conditions) is entitled to receive involuntary separation pay (severance pay).

In short (for example), if an Air Force E-4 does not get promoted to E-5 by the time he/she has 8 years of military service, the member will be forced to separate. These rules are strictly enforced especially during times of downsizing and force reduction.

Air Force (active and reserves) Effective Sept 2013

E-4 - 8 years
E-5 - 15 years
E-6 - 22 years
E-7 - 26 years
E-8 - 28 years
E-9 - 30 years

Army (active and AGR) RCP, Effective Jan 2017

E-1 to E-3 - 5 years
E-4 - 8 years
E-4 (Promotable) - 10years
E-5 - 14 years
E-5 (Promotable) - 15 years
E-6 - 20 years
E-6 (Promotable) - 20 years
E-7 - 24 years
E-7 (Promotable) - 26 years
E-8 - 30 years
E-8 (Promotable) - 30 years
E-9 - 30 years

The Army has also changed the maximum age an enlisted member can remain on active duty from 55 years to 62 years.

Navy (Active, effective January 2015)

E-1, E-2 - 4 years
E-3 5 years
E-4 - 8 years
*E-5 - 14 years (20 years for Reserves)
E-6 - 20 years
E-7 - 24 years
E-8 - 26 years
E-9 - 30 years

Note: The Navy changed E-5 HYT from 20 years to 14 years, effective July 1, 2005.

However, sailors with more than ten years of service as of July 1, 2005 may remain in the service until they are retirement eligible (20 years of service).

https://www.thebalancecareers.com/hi...litary-3355995
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2018, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Metropolis IL
1,443 posts, read 1,707,985 times
Reputation: 2084
I don't know how it is now, but in my day 25-30 years ago, in the Navy if you made E-5 you were allowed to stay for 20 years and retirement. In the aviation ratings, I never knew anyone not to make E-6. The logjam in those times was making Chief (E-7). Only about 30% made Chief before they retired. The advancement could come anywhere between 8 and 20 years time in service, depending on the individual and how many the Navy needed in the particular rating. The boom time was during the Reagan build-up in the 80's. 80% of those board eligible made Chief in the Air Traffic Control Rating one year. The FAA mass hiring after the PATCO strike in 1981 helped advancement in that era as well.

By the mid 1990's, the Navy was offering early retirement for those with between 15-20 years service, and it was next to impossible to advance beyond E-6.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 07:31 AM
 
17,245 posts, read 9,381,933 times
Reputation: 16520
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLS2753 View Post

By the mid 1990's, the Navy was offering early retirement for those with between 15-20 years service, and it was next to impossible to advance beyond E-6.
Yeah that happened across the services in the mid-90s. The problem for me in the Air Force was that slow promotions had always been a way of life in the Air Force, and a 15-year E-5 was as common as a fully occupied row of urinals at 1030.

So many of them took the money and said see-ya that it socked me in the gut in my particular unit. It left me with a bunch of E-3s and E-4s (E-4 is not an NCO grade in the Air Force) and without the people who were my primary trainers and go-tos. The situation sucked for a good while.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Arizona
859 posts, read 927,798 times
Reputation: 1082
HYT is adjusted up or down depending on retention/manning targets. I retired from the USAF in 1998 at 20 years as a TSgt after hitting HYT. A few years previous to that, HYT was 23 years for TSgt and 20 years for SSgt. Heck, until the early 1990's, one could retire at 20 years as an E-4 Sergeant (back when that rank still existed) and I knew a couple guys that did that. I guess they had no ambition for higher rank and just rode it out until retirement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,554 posts, read 38,426,025 times
Reputation: 48001
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLS2753 View Post
I don't know how it is now, but in my day 25-30 years ago, in the Navy if you made E-5 you were allowed to stay for 20 years and retirement. In the aviation ratings, I never knew anyone not to make E-6. The logjam in those times was making Chief (E-7). Only about 30% made Chief before they retired. The advancement could come anywhere between 8 and 20 years time in service, depending on the individual and how many the Navy needed in the particular rating. The boom time was during the Reagan build-up in the 80's. 80% of those board eligible made Chief in the Air Traffic Control Rating one year. The FAA mass hiring after the PATCO strike in 1981 helped advancement in that era as well.

By the mid 1990's, the Navy was offering early retirement for those with between 15-20 years service, and it was next to impossible to advance beyond E-6.
Currently, the Navy's HYT threshold is:

- E-3: 6 years
- E-4: 10 years
- E-5: 16 years
- E-6: 22 years
- E-7: 24 years
- E-8: 26 years
- E-9: 30 years

Several of these were recently bumped up by a couple of years over the past couple of fiscal years.

Re: making Chief, last year's advancement rate was about 24% overall.

But advancement rates specific to a given rating fluctuate depending on the need within the rating and how the rating is overall manned, as always. Some advance very few per year, still. Others advance many. Some ratings are just far more competitive than others. My husband (E-8) is in a rating that's typically always pretty middle of the pack, as far as advancement, and he pinned anchors 11 years in, in 2012, made Senior Chief in 2015.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2018, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
3,282 posts, read 782,009 times
Reputation: 4707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ralph_Kirk View Post
Yeah that happened across the services in the mid-90s. The problem for me in the Air Force was that slow promotions had always been a way of life in the Air Force, and a 15-year E-5 was as common as a fully occupied row of urinals at 1030.e.
Those were the old days. Recently, the Air Force took away TIS and TIG for promotions points so now people are promoting faster than ever. It leveled the playing field. For example, half the people who made E7 this year were first time testers, that used to be unheard of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-29-2018, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Billings, MT
8,713 posts, read 6,817,273 times
Reputation: 11974
Quote:
Originally Posted by flashlight View Post
did you get an active duty retirement, or a reserve retirement (delayed retirement pay)?

I retired as a Seabee in the Navy Reserve, with a total time in service of 34+ years (active, drilling reservist, and Fleet Reserve).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-29-2018, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,123 posts, read 41,967,920 times
Reputation: 10968
Correct me if I am wrong here - but the way I understand it, if you are *enlisted* and you do a good job, don't screw up, and you want to do 20 years to get the pension - you can.

While as an officer, you just about have to get one of the relatively few O-6 slots, become a Colonel (or "full bird" Captain if Navy) - or you don't make it to 20. Some ROTC programs may "start the clock" while you are still in college, so those people have a better shot at getting to 20, probably can do it as O-5.

Is this correct?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top