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Old 05-30-2018, 12:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Chops = supply corps officers?
They have oak (or some tree) leaves on their sleeves instead of stars. Looks kinda like a pork chop.
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Old 05-30-2018, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Chops = supply corps officers?
Yes, long tradition follows that supply officers account for how many pork chops are onboard. So any time the menu is tweaked they have nightmares.
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Old 05-30-2018, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Yes, long tradition follows that supply officers account for how many pork chops are onboard. So any time the menu is tweaked they have nightmares.
I take it you hold the folks who do the provisioning in fairly high regard, especially for rations. Quite a number of supply corps people go into the business or logistics field when they get out of the service too.
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Old 05-30-2018, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
I take it you hold the folks who do the provisioning in fairly high regard, especially for rations. Quite a number of supply corps people go into the business or logistics field when they get out of the service too.
When deployed underwater for 7 months every year they serve 4 meals a day, food is well documented as having a large effect on crew morale.
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Old 05-30-2018, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
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SUB

As a former Submariner EM4(SS) (1961 to 1967) it was a no brainer to make E5 with 6 years, E6 within 8 years and E7 within 10 years. What happened?

PS

I avoided Boomers....boring......LOL
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Old 05-30-2018, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,556 posts, read 38,448,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post

My point, poorly articulated, was that enlisted promotions are not as "slot-limited" (except to E-9) as officer promotions are. You can't make it to Lt. Col. just for doing a good job as a Major, there has to be a billet for a Lt. Col available, and there are a lot more slots for Majors than Lt. Col. Or so I have heard and read.
Depends. In the Navy, quotas for advancement can be dicey depending on the job/rating once one reaches the NCO rates of E-7 through E-9, Chief's Mess. Some of the highly specialiized ratings just don't advance many per year for Chief and up.
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Old 05-30-2018, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
SUB

As a former Submariner EM4(SS) (1961 to 1967) it was a no brainer to make E5 with 6 years, E6 within 8 years and E7 within 10 years. What happened?

PS

I avoided Boomers....boring......LOL
When I started [1977] it was commonly assumed that any one of us who stayed in was going to be an E7 within 10 years, and clear E9 within 20 years.

I got out after 6 years and went to college. By the time I came back in [1987], things had changed. I was an E5 eligible for E6 before I got out, when I came back in I had to wait 3 years again before E6 [1990]. Then another 3 years before my first attempt at E7 [1993]. At that time we were in a 'draw-down' to reduce the size of the military. They virtually stopped making E7s. They were selectively offering cash to some E5s to leave the Navy. But E6s were left alone. On my last two boats [SSBN 633 and SSBN 732] we were loaded up with lots of E6s, very few E4s or E5s. I am a Navigation ET, my division is normally manned with 9 guys. On my last boat all of us were E6s all eligible for E7. All of us made it to the selection board, fleetwide they were selecting one to advance to E7 each year.

I have a dear friend who was an E7 [A-gang] he screwed up by allowing his enlistment to end at 18 years. They refused to re-enlist him. They said there were no open billets for an MMC [SS] anywhere in the Navy. So with 18 years he became a civilian. no pension.

If I had not gotten out, if I had stayed in continuous I would have made E7, I have no doubt.

In my opinion, they should have forced everyone over 20 to retire. Flushed them out, and opened those billets for fleet sailors to advance up into.



btw, the year I made E6 [1990], I bumped into a guy [Eddy] that I had served with on my first boat. When I put on E6, he put on E9. He was a 12 year E9. Back in the 70s we were both E5s together. While I got out for 4 years, Eddy had stayed in and worse. He made back-to-back patrols. You can't do two, if you are sick enough to volunteer for that you have to do them in threes. That is what he did. He was on the gold crew and he volunteered to stay on the boat to patrol with the blue crew, then follow it with the gold crew again. Instead of the usual 105 day patrol, he did 3X that 315 days on the boat. You mentioned how boomer patrols are 'boring', imagine doing 3 of them back-to-back? When I saw him in 1990 he was reporting to his first shore duty tour to be the CMC of a Naval hospital. It was the first time he was going to be at a command with female sailors, and he was going to be their CMC. He was scared to death of that.

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Old 05-31-2018, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
7,867 posts, read 5,594,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
When deployed underwater for 7 months every year they serve 4 meals a day, food is well documented as having a large effect on crew morale.
So do submariners enjoy the best rations in the Navy? I wouldn't be surprised, and hope you get that - you deserve it.
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Old 05-31-2018, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
7,867 posts, read 5,594,252 times
Reputation: 4935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
When deployed underwater for 7 months every year they serve 4 meals a day, food is well documented as having a large effect on crew morale.
So do submariners enjoy the best rations in the Navy? I hope you did - you deserve it.
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Old 05-31-2018, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,445 posts, read 46,810,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
So do submariners enjoy the best rations in the Navy? I wouldn't be surprised, and hope you get that - you deserve it.
Every vessel has a set budget 'per-crewman-per-day' to provide food. I was told many times that subs have the highest budget for food, in a 'per-crewman-per-daily' context.

'Best' is subjective.

Milk and eggs both spoil quickly. Every time we surface for some reason we tend to meet a tug loaded with 'fresh' milk, eggs, and veggies. Every boat I have been on the cooks will try to freeze milk, but they simply do not have the proper equipment to thaw it to serve. So it separates and gets nasty.

Honestly you are better served by simply using powdered milk and eggs.

Carrots, turnips, beets, and potatoes seem to last months piled in the bilges with a little sea water sloshing around on them.

On one patrol we ran out of food, that was an interesting experience.

For the most part steak can be served 2 or 3 times every week. Lobster tails will be served maybe once a month.

The menu is written as a 6-week schedule, after 6-weeks you repeat the same schedule. Every patrol the crew is invited to a menu review meeting to discuss how many pizza nights you want in a 6-week schedule, how many lobster meals, how many mexican meals, etc.

I have been on boats where every Friday a different division will take over and serve a meal. As a part of a competition. The Goat locker against A-gang, The Reactor Operators against the torpedomen. etc.
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