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Old 06-06-2018, 08:14 AM
 
17,847 posts, read 9,790,211 times
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Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
One of the main reasons I got out of the Airforce in 1976 was that I had four years in and had already reach E5. Even if I maxed out on all test scores and had a bunch of medals, like the MOH, it would have been 12 years before I could ever get a promotion. Five or six years might have kept me in. It wasn't the promotions so much as I could see that because it would be impossible it could affect my performance. I didn't want an excuse to slack off.
That depended a lot on the specialty. In a lot of specialties, promotions were wide open because people who had joined the Air Force to avoid the Vietnam draft were exiting en masse. Tech Sergeant usually tended to be a toughie, but the latter 70s weren't that hard in most specialties.

Quote:
The fact that people were not testing at the same time and some E5s who had tested early were helping buddy slackers with 18 years TIS with the test didn't help.
Those people should have gone to jail. The Air Force was (I expect still is) extremely strict about early testers revealing test information in any way to later testers. I saw married couples get into trouble for that reason. About 1976 our squadron fell under investigation to track down someone who had circulated a study guide--each one of us was called in to a sound-proofed OSI interrogation room and got hot-lighted.
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Old 06-06-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
7,918 posts, read 6,674,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Yes, long tradition follows that supply officers account for how many pork chops are onboard. So any time the menu is tweaked they have nightmares.
We called them SLJO's..****ty Little Jobs Officer...
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Old 06-06-2018, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Every vessel has a set budget 'per-crewman-per-day' to provide food. I was told many times that subs have the highest budget for food, in a 'per-crewman-per-daily' context.

'Best' is subjective.

Milk and eggs both spoil quickly. Every time we surface for some reason we tend to meet a tug loaded with 'fresh' milk, eggs, and veggies. Every boat I have been on the cooks will try to freeze milk, but they simply do not have the proper equipment to thaw it to serve. So it separates and gets nasty.

Honestly you are better served by simply using powdered milk and eggs.

Carrots, turnips, beets, and potatoes seem to last months piled in the bilges with a little sea water sloshing around on them.

On one patrol we ran out of food, that was an interesting experience.

For the most part steak can be served 2 or 3 times every week. Lobster tails will be served maybe once a month.

The menu is written as a 6-week schedule, after 6-weeks you repeat the same schedule. Every patrol the crew is invited to a menu review meeting to discuss how many pizza nights you want in a 6-week schedule, how many lobster meals, how many mexican meals, etc.

I have been on boats where every Friday a different division will take over and serve a meal. As a part of a competition. The Goat locker against A-gang, The Reactor Operators against the torpedomen. etc.
SUB rode Boomers (SSBN Missile Boats) so 90 day patrol, 90 days hoe, 90 day patrol and almost never visit any port. I rode Fast Attack (SS and SSN) so while we might be at see for 90 days, we would hit a port every other week or so thus we could get fresh provisions and nasty women...LOL
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Old 06-06-2018, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,691 posts, read 47,400,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
We called them SLJO's..****ty Little Jobs Officer...
From what I saw the most junior wardroom members got all the 'little jobs'. Many of which were hot potatoes.

I have seen a lot of ensigns and LTJGs who got burned-out by being over-loaded with little jobs.
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Old 06-06-2018, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,691 posts, read 47,400,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
SUB rode Boomers (SSBN Missile Boats) so 90 day patrol, 90 days hoe, 90 day patrol and almost never visit any port. I rode Fast Attack (SS and SSN) so while we might be at see for 90 days, we would hit a port every other week or so thus we could get fresh provisions and nasty women ... LOL
'Almost never'? I have done three port visits in my career.

My first boat had a port visit in 1978, Lisbon Portugal for 3 days [we had to surface after the reactor broke and needed repair parts].

Then my second sub had a port visit in 1992, St. Thomas, Charlotte Amalie for 3 days. We were on our way to the Panama Channel and we got way too far ahead of the PIM track, so Squadron ordered our captain to stop for a port visit. It was the first port visit of his O6 career. He was very upset about being ordered to do it, he felt that by stopping somewhere it would kill his chances for advancement to O7.

My last boat stopped in San Diego once in 1997, as a port visit for 3 days.
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Old 06-06-2018, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,804 posts, read 39,237,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
Yes. After Submariner mentioned the additional NECs available to CSs, I noticed that one of them was about baking (3527) - which corresponds to a qualification for pastry chef. Strong prep for a professional life in the food service field.
I know several chefs who are former CSs.
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