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Old 05-31-2018, 05:41 PM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
695 posts, read 409,264 times
Reputation: 1766

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Unless it is some macho thing, I am having a hard time understanding why you would want infantry. Or the Army for that matter. I am retired Navy, so of course I am biased in that regard. If I could do it all over again, I would tell my 18 year old self to join the Coast Guard. In fact, before I got hurt and medically retired, I had spoken to a CG recruiter about changing branches (they needed aviation mechanics badly at that point, and I was guaranteed to keep my E-5).


If you want to see the world, go Navy.


The CG has some really nice duty stations, they have a very interesting mission (law enforcement, maritime law enforcement, boat inspections).


You can join up to age 32 if you have a degree.


The Air Force would be third for me, just because of the really poor base locations in some areas, lack of travel.


The Army and Marines would be my last resort.


Your age won't be a problem in either the CG or Navy. One of my high school buddies went CG, by the time he was an E-5, he was on small boat team, spending his days patrolling the harbor in Miami, doing boat inspections. While I was busting my butt on an aircraft carrier in the Gulf, he was pulling over leisure craft, checking for hidden drugs, and making sure there were enough life vests.
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Old 05-31-2018, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,062 posts, read 37,693,162 times
Reputation: 46997
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennington302 View Post
I was looking for guidance and opinions on what people thought of joining the Army as a 30 year old. I currently work as a teacher, and I was hoping to get advice on what I should do as far as enlisting. I do not have a wife or kids and no ties to my local area. I was in the process of joining the military as a 22 year old but an injury in college put the process on hold, and I joined the work force as a teacher. I have done research and understand that I would be taking orders from officers that were 8-10 years younger than I am. It would be difficult, but it is something I can live with and get past. What advice would you give me as far as choosing my path? I was leaning towards an 11 contract, but after doing some research it seems as if a 35M or 35L would also suit my skill set. I know that I am older than most enlisted men, but any advice or sharing of personal experiences would be great. Thanks for any help.
My spouse enlisted in the Navy at 28. He was also previously a teacher. He did not have an issue at all with being one of the older ones; it came with a number of perks. He also advanced in rank very quickly. Feel free to DM me if you have any questions on specifics.
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Old 05-31-2018, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,062 posts, read 37,693,162 times
Reputation: 46997
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pennington302 View Post
I looked over the different codes for the Army and I wasn't sure which MOS I would be best prepared for based on my experience. Just wanted to get people's opinions and feedback from their own experiences or friends experiences. I have been intrigued by the 35 series, especially 35M and 35L, but I am not sure I want to get stuck behind a desk. From what I understand, a lot of the intelligence jobs can be a lot of paperwork and desk time. This is from what I have read and through my own research. Any personal experiences and information would be appreciated!
My husband's rating (Navy equivalent of MOS) is only loosely connected to his degree and his professional experience, but it was in an area where there was a need, and fit his skill set. He works currently in an Army/Navy joint intelligence unit.
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Old 06-01-2018, 01:46 AM
 
Location: north narrowlina
307 posts, read 89,154 times
Reputation: 1281
someone mentioned that the army can send you anywhere. is that really true? my son was just a basic grunt, but he graduated top of his class at basic training, which gave him options.

i just want to thank you for considering serving our country in whatever capacity. it seems so few do have that kind of heart, and simple gratitude.

Bright bright bright blessings for you..... and let me know where you do get stationed, i'd love to send you a little care package every now and then to just cheer you up.... with the kind of things i used to send to my son who died in Fallujah in 2005...... would be nice to do for another soldier who is walking in his footsteps.
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Old 06-01-2018, 01:56 AM
 
Location: U.S.A., Earth
4,146 posts, read 2,432,831 times
Reputation: 3572
Heh... someone I worked with asked others if the armed services would let him join at 50. He's secured his wealth, raised kids, and wouldn't mind serving his country, and taking on that new experience. Nope! He's at least 15 to 20 years past the cutoff age!


Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
My spouse enlisted in the Navy at 28. He was also previously a teacher. He did not have an issue at all with being one of the older ones; it came with a number of perks. He also advanced in rank very quickly. Feel free to DM me if you have any questions on specifics.
I had a high school buddy join the Navy at around 21. During boot camp, there were quite a few recruits about a decade older than him. Some of them were ex-college professors. They got bumped down to part-time employment, calculated they couldn't pay the bills on that reduced pay, so joined the Navy as the better option.
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Old 06-01-2018, 06:45 AM
PFM
 
Location: Endicott, NY
98 posts, read 94,094 times
Reputation: 210
Do your research on both fields - Infantry and Military Intelligence - before you make any decisions. As stated, Infantry is a young man's game, and many of the old retirees you run into have back and knee problems from years of training and deployments. Both fields have low cutoff scores for promotion to Sergeant and Staff Sergeant, but Infantry has a lot more candidates and a lot more competition at higher grade promotions. MI also offers Warrant Officer and Officer slots - so does IN, but again you have a lot more candidates competing for those slots. MI slots will require a higher security clearance, so review your background and note anything that might be sketchy, because they will. As far as age, you shouldn't have any problem - used to be with your education you'd come in as an E-4, but not sure about today. Good Luck, and after 10 years the time passes pretty quickly. Lucky you, you get to choose between sweltering Georgia or convection oven Arizona for training LOL .
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Old 06-01-2018, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Elysium
5,310 posts, read 2,753,500 times
Reputation: 3652
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceiligrrl View Post
someone mentioned that the army can send you anywhere. is that really true? my son was just a basic grunt, but he graduated top of his class at basic training, which gave him options.

i just want to thank you for considering serving our country in whatever capacity. it seems so few do have that kind of heart, and simple gratitude.

Bright bright bright blessings for you..... and let me know where you do get stationed, i'd love to send you a little care package every now and then to just cheer you up.... with the kind of things i used to send to my son who died in Fallujah in 2005...... would be nice to do for another soldier who is walking in his footsteps.
We are sorry for your loss.

Yes it is true, the Army and its soldiers work for a government with global concerns and soldiers can be sent anywhere as a political message, a local guard force or an attacking force. Politically these days there is a tendency to send older soldiers from a large corps of Special Forces who are on at least their second enlistment period but if needed reserves are called up along with regular soldiers being forcibly deployed away from their duty station as their bodies become literally the sword and shield for the nation.

Given a pinch like during the Korean conflict or August 1944 when the Army ran out of infantry no matter what your MOS was you can be made into an 11B light infantryman. While such a scenario doesn't seem likely today during the Iraq War many artillery and armor units being "combat arms" were among the first taking personal self defense weapons and going through doors to supplement the infantry instead of firing big crew served weapons at a distance. Meanwhile others of many MOS's found themselves escorting truck convoys as their basic job was the rifle or machine gun they manned and not the skill taught at AIT.
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Old 06-01-2018, 10:53 AM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
695 posts, read 409,264 times
Reputation: 1766
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiko View Post
We are sorry for your loss.

Yes it is true, the Army and its soldiers work for a government with global concerns and soldiers can be sent anywhere as a political message, a local guard force or an attacking force. Politically these days there is a tendency to send older soldiers from a large corps of Special Forces who are on at least their second enlistment period but if needed reserves are called up along with regular soldiers being forcibly deployed away from their duty station as their bodies become literally the sword and shield for the nation.

Given a pinch like during the Korean conflict or August 1944 when the Army ran out of infantry no matter what your MOS was you can be made into an 11B light infantryman. While such a scenario doesn't seem likely today during the Iraq War many artillery and armor units being "combat arms" were among the first taking personal self defense weapons and going through doors to supplement the infantry instead of firing big crew served weapons at a distance. Meanwhile others of many MOS's found themselves escorting truck convoys as their basic job was the rifle or machine gun they manned and not the skill taught at AIT.
What you stated, is the exact reason I will never recommend anyone to join the Army or Marines. That is unless they want to fight. My nephew is active duty Army, he is a combat medic. He wants to fight. He knows what he is getting into. As soon as he finishes his training, he is going Airborne, and after that, he wants to try Ranger. So if you want to sling brass for a living, that's fine. However, my SIL is also active duty Army. She is in supply. She was lead to believe that she would never see combat. That was a lie. She has completed 3 tours in Iraq, and 2 in Afghanistan. She spent most of her time as security for convoys. She has been shot at multiple times. She has killed multiple enemy. It bothers her a lot. She has 14 years in so she is sticking through to retirement, but she now regrets choosing the Army.


I have a Co-worker who was an electronics repair technician in the Marines, however he never did that job. As soon as he got out of technical school, they sent him to Afghanistan, put him as a M240 gunner, and for the entirety of his 8 month career as a Marine (after boot camp and school), that is what he did. He lost his leg to a RPG while on patrol, and he has permanent neurological problems.
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Old 06-01-2018, 01:44 PM
PFM
 
Location: Endicott, NY
98 posts, read 94,094 times
Reputation: 210
I shouldn't tell him about the Navy Chief that was doing security details with us in Baghdad or the other Chief
and his K9 that did missions in Mosul or my cousin - a Navy Yeoman of all things - who was shot in the chest
plate in Kandahar doing convoy duty. Today all service members from all branches can end up in places they never thought they'd be in a million years.
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Old 06-01-2018, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,062 posts, read 37,693,162 times
Reputation: 46997
My husband is a Navy Senior Chief who served in Baghdad.

He has been in more sand than water.
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