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Old 07-11-2018, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Southern California
926 posts, read 969,652 times
Reputation: 2181

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Pony tails, bigger buns, and other styles are now OK:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/n...711-story.html

I don't see anything wrong with offering women a little more flexibility, since the newly authorized styles are still pretty conservative.
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Old 07-12-2018, 12:57 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
2,727 posts, read 669,231 times
Reputation: 4110
So is the Air Force. I suppose they're just attempting to appeal and appease a younger, kindler, and gentler generation of servicemembers.
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Old 07-12-2018, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Schaumburg
662 posts, read 2,602,680 times
Reputation: 780
I remember when I went to Navy boot camp in 1986, the Navy was the only service who made the women cut their hair above their collars. The other services could wear it up from day one.

After 6 weeks of boot camp in the humid Orlando weather, my thick frizzy hair was poofing out. I was stopped by someone who said "recruit, your hair is too....", and he couldn't finish the sentence. It wasn't too long, it was too wide from the humidity!
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Old 07-12-2018, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Hawaii/Alabama
1,551 posts, read 2,885,162 times
Reputation: 3716
When I was at the Ft. McClellan (Army) reception center in 1985 I was made to cut my waist length (very thick and curly) hair to just below my shoulders, despite my showing them that I could put it in a bun that met the regs in under 30 seconds and it would have been easier at the waist length

When the other females would complain that they couldn't get their hair up under their BDU hat and above their collars my DS would make me take my hair down and put it up and pointed out that if I could do it, they could do it. It was stupid, since they saw me do this every day in our barracks at least twice a day, but it was all about the show.

It is nice for those females in Service to have more options.
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Old 07-12-2018, 09:49 AM
 
16,935 posts, read 9,241,019 times
Reputation: 16185
When I first went into the Air Force, cornrows and other braids were explicitly prohibited by 35-10 as "extreme and faddish," despite the fact that they were eminently efficient hairstyles for military women in the field.

By the time I retired, Bo Derek had put them into the mainstream and enough women were in authoritative positions to get the regs changed. Last time I looked, one of the women pictured in the dress regulation was wearing cornrows.

I also remember when "high and tight" was prohibited in the Air Force as "extreme and faddish," but that began to change in the late 80s. In the 90s--when I was at Pearl Harbor and had a Marine colonel boss and Marines and solders working for me--all wearing "high and tight"--I went that way myself.
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Old 07-12-2018, 10:48 AM
 
8,592 posts, read 7,020,111 times
Reputation: 11409
Quote:
Originally Posted by purplesky View Post
I remember when I went to Navy boot camp in 1986, the Navy was the only service who made the women cut their hair above their collars. The other services could wear it up from day one.

After 6 weeks of boot camp in the humid Orlando weather, my thick frizzy hair was poofing out. I was stopped by someone who said "recruit, your hair is too....", and he couldn't finish the sentence. It wasn't too long, it was too wide from the humidity!
I still have my boot camp yearbook from Orlando 1990. The difference between the menís barber shop and the ladies beauty salon was huge.
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Old 07-12-2018, 10:55 AM
 
8,592 posts, read 7,020,111 times
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This brings up that old question of why do men in boot camp get a buzz cut and women get a trim and why do men have to keep their hair cut short and women are allowed longer hair after boot camp? I was told all sorts of reasons for the men getting the buzz cuts from head lice to breaking down their spirit to build them back up. Was also told many various reasons for keeping it short after boot camp most having to do with combat and various headgear. Well, women go through the same boot camp and are now serving in combat rolls but the requirements haven’t changed for them. I’m not looking to fully change the refs so women MUST get the same cuts as men nor allowing men to have the same length regulations as women. Just looking for the logic in the difference other than different sex/gender rolls.
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Old 07-12-2018, 11:23 AM
 
Location: between three Great Lakes.
1,531 posts, read 1,707,241 times
Reputation: 4948
This is excellent news from the U.S. Navy. It shows they're listening.

"I was stopped by someone who said "recruit, your hair is too....", and he couldn't finish the sentence."

I know what he meant, because I have exactly the same kind of hair. The phrase he was looking for was
"too Rosanne Roasannadanna"!

Navy is relaxing women's hair style requirements-fan-hair-1-.jpg
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Old 07-12-2018, 11:25 AM
 
Location: between three Great Lakes.
1,531 posts, read 1,707,241 times
Reputation: 4948
are now serving in combat rolls
other than different sex/gender rolls

The word you want is "role." Rolls are bread.
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Old 07-12-2018, 11:42 AM
 
16,935 posts, read 9,241,019 times
Reputation: 16185
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
This brings up that old question of why do men in boot camp get a buzz cut and women get a trim and why do men have to keep their hair cut short and women are allowed longer hair after boot camp? I was told all sorts of reasons for the men getting the buzz cuts from head lice to breaking down their spirit to build them back up. Was also told many various reasons for keeping it short after boot camp most having to do with combat and various headgear. Well, women go through the same boot camp and are now serving in combat rolls but the requirements havenít changed for them. Iím not looking to fully change the refs so women MUST get the same cuts as men nor allowing men to have the same length regulations as women. Just looking for the logic in the difference other than different sex/gender rolls.
Back in the early 70s, after our first full and very long day of basic training, at about 0100 hours, just before putting us to bed, our TI sat us down on our tails in the break room.

Sergeant Jimmy Weeks was from South Carolina. He was about 5-6, built like a firehydrant. He had a thick southern drawl and talked out of the side of his mouth like he needed to spit tobacco.

He said to us:

"One thing we ain't gonna have in this flight is racial trouble.

The reason we ain't gonna have no racial trouble is because you ain't got no reason to have racial trouble.

The reason you ain't got no reason to have racial trouble is because you're all the same color, namely green.

You all got the same hair, namely none.

You all got the same daddy, namely me.

An' you all got the same wants and desires, namely to get the @#$%&* out of here!"

The main reason is to erase the social lines that divide people in the civilian world: Hair styles, clothing labels, et cetera.

That's not "removing individuality," it's just removing cultural lines that are detrimental to the new military culture. Right after that speech, Sgt Weeks started creating new military individualities: One would be dorm chief, several would be bay chiefs, one would be latrine chief, one (me) would be "house mouse," et cetera.

And we'd learn to operate as separate members of a single body (because a body must have different members--not everyone can be a hand or an eye) with one head and one purpose.

Later, some would be mechanics, some would be cooks, some would be police, some would be intelligence, some would be fuelers, some would be weapons loaders.
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