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Old 07-21-2018, 11:34 AM
 
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Hello - I have a question for military historians, writers, and personnel regarding when to capitalize rank. Specifically, do I capitalize rank in this sentence:
"The voyage went by way of Rotterdam, where we found two officers for my batallion, namely Captain ______ and Lieutenant ____."
I know that traditionally rank in this context should be capitalized, but I also know that over time rules change. I'm curious about practices today.

Thank you for any advice / suggestions!
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Old 07-21-2018, 11:44 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,010 posts, read 38,593,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lieneke View Post
Hello - I have a question for military historians, writers, and personnel regarding when to capitalize rank. Specifically, do I capitalize rank in this sentence:
"The voyage went by way of Rotterdam, where we found two officers for my batallion, namely Captain ______ and Lieutenant ____."
I know that traditionally rank in this context should be capitalized, but I also know that over time rules change. I'm curious about practices today.

Thank you for any advice / suggestions!
https://english.stackexchange.com/qu...et-capitalized

Quote:
This is a style issue, and the appropriate style for you to use depends on which style guide you or your publisher or school generally follows and whether that guide specifies a rule for handling military (or other hierarchical) titles. The influential (in the United States) Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003), lays out one approach:

Titles and Offices

8.21 Capitalization: the general rule/ Civil, military, religious and professional titles are capitalized when they immediately precede a personal name and are thus used as part of the name (usually replacing the title holder's first name. Titles are normally lowercased when following a name or used in place of a name ...

[Examples:] President Lincoln; the president; General Bradley; the general; Cardinal Newman; the cardinal Dean Mueller; the dean; Governors Edgar and Ryan; the governors
Times may have changed...
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Old 07-21-2018, 12:42 PM
 
4,751 posts, read 2,151,255 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
https://english.stackexchange.com/qu...et-capitalized

"This is a style issue, and the appropriate style for you to use depends on which style guide you or your publisher or school generally follows and whether that guide specifies a rule for handling military (or other hierarchical) titles. The influential (in the United States) Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003), lays out one approach:

Titles and Offices

8.21 Capitalization: the general rule/ Civil, military, religious and professional titles are capitalized when they immediately precede a personal name and are thus used as part of the name (usually replacing the title holder's first name. Titles are normally lowercased when following a name or used in place of a name ...

[Examples:] President Lincoln; the president; General Bradley; the general; Cardinal Newman; the cardinal Dean Mueller; the dean; Governors Edgar and Ryan; the governors"

Times may have changed...
Thank you! That was my assumption - that tradition has not changed that much.

Appreciate it!
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:22 PM
 
4,751 posts, read 2,151,255 times
Reputation: 4334
Moderator cut: thread title changed

"the wagoneer drank warm lavas and sometimes a glass of gin."
What are "lavas"?

Could "warm lavas" be a warm spiced drink? I found something in early 1800 South African recipes, but not sure what that means in relation to spices. Is "lavas" a spice?

Last edited by toosie; 07-21-2018 at 05:40 PM..
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