U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-27-2018, 08:18 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,770 posts, read 38,073,126 times
Reputation: 27722

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
why do our troops suffer such a high rate of depression and suicide rates

I wanted to get the perspective of the vets
I am a retired U.S. Army Soldier. I served 22+ years on continuous active duty. I did not see a high rate of depression or suicide rate. I did see a lot of alcohol abuse, and wife abuse. I "heard" of others in other units having those issues...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
True but what makes them more prone to this vs troops from other countries ?

and even troops of WW1 WW2 generation?
I had encounters with NATO troops on occasion, such as the annual "Reforger" exercises. I did not see U.S. Troops being "more prone" to issues than military from other countries.

I can not speak for WW1 and WW2. I was on continuous active duty from 1968 to 1990.

I am not trying to evade the issues, I am ignoring the "barracks talk" which seems to permeate the military community.

I've seen a few troops who went AWOL, one who returned from AWOL and went AWOL again upon he return. He was DFR'd (Dropped from the Rolls). We packed up his belonging's and shipped them to unknown locations. His unit paperwork was shipped elsewhere, he was made to disappear from our unit records. We never heard from him again, or what ever happened to him.

I vaguely recall two soldiers who went AWOL, one allegedly committed suicide the other "disappeared" we never heard from him.

I had a medical issue early on, a hearing problem, I was pulled my normal duties as MOS 16E, and worked in the Orderly Room, Mail Room, Supply Room etc... I got to see the internal workings of the unit. I enjoyed those duties and even enjoyed being the "Duty Driver"...

Some people have no clue of what military life is really like. I don't know what the solution is. Some just do not make it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-27-2018, 08:38 AM
 
17,263 posts, read 9,404,591 times
Reputation: 16543
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
My personal option only
1. They are away from family and friends, and lack the normal family support systems many people enjoyp.
I'd say it's the opposite. Besides a military career of my own, I come from a family of military careerists. All the men have been soldiers and all the women have married soldiers, back to the Spanish-American war.

Our lives have been in the military and around military, through war after war. Yes, there was PTSD in my family--I've been aware of it from my own childhood in the late 50s. But were were continuosly surrounded by people with shared experiences who understood, soldier fathers, soldier grandfathers, soldier sons understanding and war grandmothers, war wives, war mothers understanding.

That's why I was actually caught me by surprise in the late 70s was the plight of soldiers who left the military and were outside the cocoon I'd been raised in.

It also points me toward some things that are being done wrong today, such as so quickly rotating soldiers out of combat and back into civilian life without time for gradual decompression around people who understand and empathize. The less time a soldier has for decompression, the worse the situation is.

And I now better understand the value of the VFW and why it needs to be re-emphasized. I know--now--the kinds of support the older men in my family gave one another. I understand better now that when I was a kid what was going on in those family gatherings when something would be said and the men would suddenly fall silent. In their own ways, soldiers were helping one another without it being such an obvious program to do so, and IMO nobody can help soldiers as well as other soldiers, particularly older soldiers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 10:02 AM
 
534 posts, read 93,229 times
Reputation: 1069
I know experiences mean little unless you have statistics,,,,,,,,,BUT......I served in the Navy ( air squadrons ) from 65-67 and never knew any married sailor ( serving beyond original enlistment ) who was married to his first wife still.

NONE

We had many sailors who were beyond first enlistment and were married.
None that served with me that had not been divorced at least once.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 10:06 AM
 
534 posts, read 93,229 times
Reputation: 1069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
I am a retired U.S. Army Soldier. I served 22+ years on continuous active duty. I did not see a high rate of depression or suicide rate. I did see a lot of alcohol abuse, and wife abuse. I "heard" of others in other units having those issues...

I had encounters with NATO troops on occasion, such as the annual "Reforger" exercises. I did not see U.S. Troops being "more prone" to issues than military from other countries.

I can not speak for WW1 and WW2. I was on continuous active duty from 1968 to 1990.

I am not trying to evade the issues, I am ignoring the "barracks talk" which seems to permeate the military community.

I've seen a few troops who went AWOL, one who returned from AWOL and went AWOL again upon he return. He was DFR'd (Dropped from the Rolls). We packed up his belonging's and shipped them to unknown locations. His unit paperwork was shipped elsewhere, he was made to disappear from our unit records. We never heard from him again, or what ever happened to him.

I vaguely recall two soldiers who went AWOL, one allegedly committed suicide the other "disappeared" we never heard from him.

I had a medical issue early on, a hearing problem, I was pulled my normal duties as MOS 16E, and worked in the Orderly Room, Mail Room, Supply Room etc... I got to see the internal workings of the unit. I enjoyed those duties and even enjoyed being the "Duty Driver"...

Some people have no clue of what military life is really like. I don't know what the solution is. Some just do not make it.
"Duty Driver"

I knew the duty driver of my air squadron from the gym.
He wanted to take a 25 day leave and the officer asked if he could find a replacement.

I said I would and got a TDY from my flight line shop.

I enjoyed it !
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 10:08 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,770 posts, read 38,073,126 times
Reputation: 27722
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melchisedec View Post
I know experiences mean little unless you have statistics,,,,,,,,,BUT......I served in the Navy ( air squadrons ) from 65-67 and never knew any married sailor ( serving beyond original enlistment ) who was married to his first wife still.

NONE

We had many sailors who were beyond first enlistment and were married.
None that served with me that had not been divorced at least once.
From: https://www.usatoday.com/story/money...te/1078283001/
Broken hearts: A rundown of the divorce capital of every state

Quote:
One of the more sobering realities of 21st-century American life is divorce.

Marriages end over a host of issues, including infidelity, stress, money troubles, and personal changes by one or both partners over the course of a marriage. Divorce can be an emotionally wrenching experience and can fracture families. For many children, divorce leaves scars that never heal.

About 40% to 50% of married couples in the United States divorce, according to the American Psychological Association. The divorce rate among those who remarry is even higher.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 12:20 PM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
4,309 posts, read 2,601,383 times
Reputation: 6886
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
why do our troops suffer such a high rate of depression and suicide rates

I wanted to get the perspective of the vets

thanks
I worked security aboard the USNS Neptune. Cable repair ship. While in Drydock in Portland, OR. They'd have weekly "Overseas reports as to movements (Unclassified) Of ships, promotions and at the end, the weekly suicides...My God 3-4 A WEEK!

One guy saw me staring at it and said "Sometimes, there's no one to talk to about your personal issues".... I felt so bad for those lives lost..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 12:22 PM
 
17,263 posts, read 9,404,591 times
Reputation: 16543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
From: About 40% to 50% of married couples in the United States divorce, according to the American Psychological Association. The divorce rate among those who remarry is even higher.
The writer of that article actually rather misunderstood the statistics.

About 40% of first marriages end in divorce. Successive marriages have higher divorce rates, with 3rd marriages having a 70% divorce rate. Mash them all together, and you get the 50% rate.

But it's important to note that first marriages are at 40%.

And within first marriages, that's only an average of other significant factors.

For instance, if you look at first marriages when both members are college-educated and comfortably employed (and coincidentally with those factors, also rather older), the divorce rate is only 20%.

But if you look at high school graduates with low-end jobs marring in their late teens and very early 20s, the divorce rate of first marriages climbs to over 50%...mash those together and you get the first-marriage divorce rate of 40%.

Statistics always begin to crumble when you look at more specific cases.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 12:27 PM
 
17,263 posts, read 9,404,591 times
Reputation: 16543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melchisedec View Post
I know experiences mean little unless you have statistics,,,,,,,,,BUT......I served in the Navy ( air squadrons ) from 65-67 and never knew any married sailor ( serving beyond original enlistment ) who was married to his first wife still.

NONE

We had many sailors who were beyond first enlistment and were married.
None that served with me that had not been divorced at least once.
In my career, having experienced the "overseas father" thing more than once, I planned to avoid those short tours. I did that by always volunteering for extended long tours on which I could take my family. As soon as I got back to CONUS, I marched into the personnel office and volunteered for extended long...anywhere.

I was still subject to TDYs even out of a long-tour location (like from Okinawa or the Philippines to South Korea), but I never had a one-year remote.

That did make us a family of nomads with never more than 2700 pounds of household goods, and we spent most of my career overseas (both of my kids were born overseas). My wife was a special-ed teacher, so she always had as much work at DODDS schools as she wanted, but she could never advance...every time we moved, she was starting again at the bottom.

But we were always together.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Chasing horses and watching circuses in Atropia.
170 posts, read 67,252 times
Reputation: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
why do our troops suffer such a high rate of depression and suicide rates
Do they?

I would like to see the stats and the corresponding figures for the same age groups/marital statuses on the civilian side.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-27-2018, 07:19 PM
 
4,487 posts, read 1,958,126 times
Reputation: 11477
Short and sweet. Some believe the lie ...and carry on. Others see the lie and realize they cannot live with it.

Ask any vet from Vietnam. Then you'll understand the above. When kids are blown up in your face or your own buddies are captured pow's, ya tend to not look forward to roll call or swabbing the deck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top