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Old 07-27-2018, 07:42 PM
 
1,777 posts, read 678,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
True but what makes them more prone to this vs troops from other countries ?

and even troops of WW1 WW2 generation?
Troops from other counties and other battles suffer the same way.
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Old 07-27-2018, 08:24 PM
 
164 posts, read 41,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
True but what makes them more prone to this vs troops from other countries ?

and even troops of WW1 WW2 generation?

Mikal Vega is a former Navy SEAL & Chief Petty Officer— a 22 year military veteran who survived numerous dangerous combat operations and deployments only to be nearly killed by the cocktail of psychiatric drugs prescribed him by military doctors. Now retired from the military, Mikal works to help Veterans overcome problems suffered in battle without the use of mind-altering psychiatric drugs or psychiatric labels.


50,578 views
[url]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVCUIxgOEno[/url]

Just search: psychiatric drugs veteran suicides. 100s of web pages on this.

Last edited by TenKW; 07-27-2018 at 08:37 PM..
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Old 07-30-2018, 07:43 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,105 posts, read 9,020,141 times
Reputation: 4529
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dad01 View Post
True but what makes them more prone to this vs troops from other countries ?

and even troops of WW1 WW2 generation?
Other countries have completely different cultures, so this is apples and oranges. I double our suicide rate is higher than Japan, for example, because suicide is epidemic in that culture. Some very religious cultures have very low suicide rates. Some countries don't engage in conflict or deployment, so that is a completely different beast, etc. What data set are you using? What countries specifically are you talking about and what is their rate compared to ours?

WW1 and WW2 veterans had lower suicide rates? If that is even true (Source please??) I would guess it was because the "Greatest Generation" was heartier. They learned to cope with adversity and disappointment better than current generations.
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Old 07-30-2018, 07:53 AM
 
17,285 posts, read 9,421,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melchisedec View Post


WW1 and WW2 veterans had lower suicide rates? If that is even true (Source please??) I would guess it was because the "Greatest Generation" was heartier. They learned to cope with adversity and disappointment better than current generations.
They were "heartier," in a way--they'd grown up during the Great Depression, after all.

But also they came back from a war against which there was no dispute to both a grateful nation and an extremely busy nation. They were given not only hero's welcomes, free drinks, and the farmer's daughter, but also sudden new access to education, jobs galore, suburban housing, business loans.

They were kept occupied and busy.

And there were so many of them that in the quiet moments when desperation might creep in, more than likely someone who truly understood was around.

That was a 'way different environment from the one that greeted those who returned from Vietnam.

And even though today there are pats on the back and sometimes free drinks, it's all really very shallow, compared to the post WWII environment.

We really probably need to take a close look at how the post WWI veterans faired in that respect. The post Korean War vets didn't have it easy, either.

And in all cases, if you have a chance to spend time with combat veterans after they're retired and no longer busy, when they are spending a lot of time contemplating the ends of their lives (which I have, coming from a long-time military family), that's when the sadness comes rolling back on them.
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Old 07-30-2018, 08:22 AM
Status: "I know you're following me." (set 16 days ago)
 
2,733 posts, read 1,422,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
My personal option only
1. They are away from family and friends, and lack the normal family support systems many people enjoy
2. It's a stressful work environment
3. There is a WIDE spread fear that mental health counseling will have a negative career impact, so people don't ask for help.


Sounds like another toxic government organisation with which I'm familiar.......
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Old 07-30-2018, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
3,494 posts, read 824,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
My personal option only
1. They are away from family and friends, and lack the normal family support systems many people enjoy
2. It's a stressful work environment
3. There is a WIDE spread fear that mental health counseling will have a negative career impact, so people don't ask for help.
Those are great points. IMO it’s:
- The military itself is a stressful job, when one mistake can get your reasssigned, lost rank, lost promotion, or ruined career
- The constant moving is stressful on families. Kids and spouses are the victims of frequent moving
- The low and unstable pay (pay increase or decreases based on location) further increase financial stress
- The avoidance of mental health
- The hopelessness of knowing any complaints you have have will be responded with, “shut up, no one forced you to join.”
- When your of low rank and pretty much everyone outranks you
- when you get court martialed and get a crappy military lawyer, instead of knowing or affording a civilian one, that could’ve got you a much favorable result
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Old 07-30-2018, 12:31 PM
 
17,285 posts, read 9,421,433 times
Reputation: 16566
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
Those are great points. IMO it’s:
- The military itself is a stressful job, when one mistake can get your reasssigned, lost rank, lost promotion, or ruined career
Or get yourself or someone else killed. I remember one of my post-military civilian bosses who had been a sailor on a carrier deck remarking to me, "One thing I know every day on this job--no matter how bad I screw up, nobody will get killed." He also said:

"If there's no blood on the deck, it's not really a problem."

And:

"Any problem that can be solved with an email or a telephone call isn't really a problem."


Quote:
- when you get court martialed and get a crappy military lawyer, instead of knowing or affording a civilian one, that could’ve got you a much favorable result
And there is so much more to wind up in court about.
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Old 07-30-2018, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Illinois USA
272 posts, read 130,164 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
First question, how many other countries use their troops in combat for the length of time USA troops are going through? There’s a reason why our military is referred to as the world police. So many of NATO countries have relied upon USA military to the point that they’ve drastically reduced their own military.

When troops came home from both world wars they were welcomed home as the victors and celebrated. When they came home they took back their jobs from those women who had taken their place and the women went back to being housewives. Today’s veterans are returning to a significant segment of the population who hate the military and despise the country. Returning veterans who attend college face hostility from fellow students and bully pulpit professors. When it comes to jobs they must now not only compete with women in the workplace, they must also compete with illegal aliens as well as legal immigrants willing to work for lower wages.

There’s the belief that if you serve then you’ll receive care for life from the VA. If you have an injury from military service then you’re covered at no cost to you for treatment for your injury. All other treatment beyond your service injury will cost you out of pocket and not all veterans live within easy distance from a VA. Even if they have access to a VA that doesn’t mean they will get timely care. Some facilities set appointments many months to nearly a year later and that’s if you aren’t put on the dummy appointment list and are never seen. The anger and frustration of dealing with the VA is very real. Some veterans have given up on trying to use the VA but those in greatest need don’t have that option. They feel lied to and betrayed.
excellent
thats the kind of response I expected
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Old 07-30-2018, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Illinois USA
272 posts, read 130,164 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
Other countries have completely different cultures, so this is apples and oranges. I double our suicide rate is higher than Japan, for example, because suicide is epidemic in that culture. Some very religious cultures have very low suicide rates. Some countries don't engage in conflict or deployment, so that is a completely different beast, etc. What data set are you using? What countries specifically are you talking about and what is their rate compared to ours?

WW1 and WW2 veterans had lower suicide rates? If that is even true (Source please??) I would guess it was because the "Greatest Generation" was heartier. They learned to cope with adversity and disappointment better than current generations.
Thats the key the bolded part

no I have no data , it was general inquiry based on perception

happy to be proven wrong

some cultures celebrate militancy and warfare
I once heard a foreign veteran of bosnian war gloat how he slaughtered serbs in front of his kids , it was really disgusting

on our side , we have a friend lets call him uncle R, he is a trapper.My friends kid took him to school so he can share with other kids what he did.Poor Uncle R was literally booed off stage when he described his talents in pest control and had a picture of a coon and a bobcat in a trap.Are these kids when they grow up ready for the realities of a war ? esp brutal insurgencies and civil wars where we put them ?
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Old 07-30-2018, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Illinois USA
272 posts, read 130,164 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty61 View Post
Troops from other counties and other battles suffer the same way.
maybe and lets well documented
I was more interested in comparison with non-western countries
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