U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-15-2018, 08:42 PM
 
14 posts, read 4,697 times
Reputation: 25

Advertisements

Back in January of 2017, I tried to enlist in the Army. I filled out the prescreening paper, gave it to my recruiter and I was given a permanent disqualification for being born with one kidney. They didn't even let me go to MEPS. It was just an instant PDQ. I then talked to an Air Force recruiter. He told me to gather up my medical papers regarding my one kidney and I'll be able to give them to him and see if I can join. He said that I'd find out in about 3-4 weeks.

But after those weeks went by, my recruiter never got back to me. I contacted him again and he again asked for medical papers. That was back in April of 2017 and I haven't heard back since. It honestly feels like he just blew me off.

Now I'm thinking of trying to enlist again, with a different recruiter obviously. I'm going to collect more recent medical papers and see if I can at least go to MEPS this time. Do I stand a better chance this time? And what was with my other recruiter not ever getting back to me? Am I to deal with that again? Or do I have a legit chance of joining the Air Force this time?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-16-2018, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,671 posts, read 4,466,447 times
Reputation: 5938
Good luck. I don't know if you can. I applaud your actions and wish you well. There are people here that can answer that question though so hang in there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2018, 03:21 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,080 posts, read 38,745,073 times
Reputation: 28044
From disqualifiers-medical-conditions: https://www.military.com/join-armed-...onditions.html

Quote:
The causes for rejection for appointment, enlistment, and induction are:

a. Cystitis.

b. Urethritis.

c. Enuresis or incontinence of urine beyond age 12.

d. Hematuria, pyuria, or other findings indicative of renal tract disease.

e. Urethral stricture or fistula.

f. Kidney.

(1) Absence of one kidney, congenital or acquired.

(2) Infections, acute or chronic.

(3) Polycystic kidney, confirmed history of.

(4) Horseshoe kidney.

(5) Hydronephrosis.

(6) Nephritis, acute or chronic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2018, 03:24 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,615 posts, read 615,195 times
Reputation: 3203
Can I join the Air Force with only one kidney?


I saw the title of the thread and couldn't resist a wise guy answer; No. If you report with one kidney, you gotta bring the other one with too


More seriously, thanks for your patriotism. If you're lucky, you're not in "the system." If your condition is congenital, there's probably no way they would suspect you have only one functioning kidney. Your condition is by no means rare. Usually one kidney is large and does all the work, so to speak, and the other one is hypoplastic (very small.) The routine kidney function screening tests are usually normal in such cases. People in this situation often have hi BP. If your BP is normal and your U/A, BUN & creatinine levels are normal, they wouldn't suspect any problem and would do no further tests.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2018, 03:35 PM
 
14 posts, read 4,697 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Can I join the Air Force with only one kidney?


I saw the title of the thread and couldn't resist a wise guy answer; No. If you report with one kidney, you gotta bring the other one with too


More seriously, thanks for your patriotism. If you're lucky, you're not in "the system." If your condition is congenital, there's probably no way they would suspect you have only one functioning kidney. Your condition is by no means rare. Usually one kidney is large and does all the work, so to speak, and the other one is hypoplastic (very small.) The routine kidney function screening tests are usually normal in such cases. People in this situation often have hi BP. If your BP is normal and your U/A, BUN & creatinine levels are normal, they wouldn't suspect any problem and would do no further tests.
Well, the thing that worries me is the fact that I've already been disqualified from the army and I've read that PDQ's stay in their system and apply to all branches.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2018, 04:04 PM
 
10,287 posts, read 7,417,405 times
Reputation: 18067
Not sure where you are or where your talents lie but there are ways to serve without actually being in the military. Thanks for having the heart of a warrior.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2018, 07:13 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,176 posts, read 9,186,711 times
Reputation: 4681
I'm a recruiting supervisor for the AF. If you can find lots of supporting documents showing you have always had normal kidney function and a recommendation from a nephrologist, you MIGHT get a waiver.

My information shows that waivers are sometimes granted by the AF. My guide says
"The AMS for the initial waiver for congenital urinary anomalies should include:
A. List and fully discuss all clinical diagnoses requiring a waiver.
B. Complete history. Discuss how condition discovered, all associated symptoms, treatments
initiated, and any side effects.
C. Exam: GU exam and result of all imaging tests.
D. Laboratory: urinalysis, BUN, creatinine and all other tests that the particular condition requires.
Need careful assessment of renal function and mention of presence or absence of stone disease.
E. Consult: Urology and/or nephrology report.
The AMS for waiver renewal for congenital urinary anomalies should include the following:
A. Interim history to include change in symptoms (particularly renal function), medication usage,
and side effects.
B. Exam: GU exam and result of all imaging tests.
C. Current treatment doses and documentation of therapeutic benefit.
D. Report from treating physician."

I'm not a doctor so I don't know what some of this means, but your doctor will know. AMS just means Aerospace Medical Squadron and is not a medical term.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2018, 03:57 PM
 
14 posts, read 4,697 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
I'm a recruiting supervisor for the AF. If you can find lots of supporting documents showing you have always had normal kidney function and a recommendation from a nephrologist, you MIGHT get a waiver.

My information shows that waivers are sometimes granted by the AF. My guide says
"The AMS for the initial waiver for congenital urinary anomalies should include:
A. List and fully discuss all clinical diagnoses requiring a waiver.
B. Complete history. Discuss how condition discovered, all associated symptoms, treatments
initiated, and any side effects.
C. Exam: GU exam and result of all imaging tests.
D. Laboratory: urinalysis, BUN, creatinine and all other tests that the particular condition requires.
Need careful assessment of renal function and mention of presence or absence of stone disease.
E. Consult: Urology and/or nephrology report.
The AMS for waiver renewal for congenital urinary anomalies should include the following:
A. Interim history to include change in symptoms (particularly renal function), medication usage,
and side effects.
B. Exam: GU exam and result of all imaging tests.
C. Current treatment doses and documentation of therapeutic benefit.
D. Report from treating physician."

I'm not a doctor so I don't know what some of this means, but your doctor will know. AMS just means Aerospace Medical Squadron and is not a medical term.
I'm actually in the process of getting medical papers together and I can't help but be a little worried about what the papers say. My one kidney was first discovered when I was 23 and I began to experience some pain in my abdominal area. The pain was to the point where I couldn't work and my boss sent me home early. This same pain is on and off and my doctor has made note of these episodes of pain. I feel like I'm done for if the military sees these notes, but I'm still going to submit them just in case.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2018, 07:37 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
3,176 posts, read 9,186,711 times
Reputation: 4681
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancined View Post
The pain was to the point where I couldn't work and my boss sent me home early. This same pain is on and off and my doctor has made note of these episodes of pain.
Yes, I'd be way more worried about that than the absence of a kidney. Short of figuring out where that pain is coming from, no way you can join. If you "couldn't work" that is a total and complete kiss of death for joining the military. At this time, I would tell you not to waste your time trying.

You see, MEPS will question what happens when you are in basic training and a mystery pain that makes you unable to work pops up and takes you out of training (hint: they send you home and separate you from the military, and MEPS gets a 'ding' for approving someone they shouldn't have). If that happens to enough people with pre-existing conditions, the doctor at MEPS can loose his job for making bad calls and costing the DOD to waste money on training people who were not fit for service.

Additionally, our waiver authority is going to wonder what happens if you are defensively (or offensively) firing at an enemy in combat, and lives are depending on you, and WHAM, pain pops up and you can't focus and it causes people to die. What if your fitness test is due and you suddenly can't run your 1.5 miles and fail your fitness test? We separate people over this or over needing to be on waivers to exempt them from fitness training, meaning we're risking spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to send you to technical school and then you can't complete your contract.

This is much more problematic that a missing kidney. I hope this all makes sense.

Any condition that has ever made you miss school or work and it not resolved is generally an unequivocal no. This is why people can't join with migraines or other such pain disorders.

If you can discover the cause of the pain and get it resolved (like hernia + hernia surgery) then you might stand a chance, but since the cause isn't even known, you effectively have 0% chance, especially coupled with the kidney.

I'm sorry, I just want to be honest so you don't have false hope.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-25-2018, 09:27 AM
Status: "I can retire today...but I love my job so...." (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: USA
534 posts, read 186,676 times
Reputation: 1448
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmarie123 View Post
I'm sorry, I just want to be honest so you don't have false hope.
Nothing wrong with giving it straight. You did him a service.

As an aside, at Wilford Hall, when it was still a functioning teach, 1000-bad hospital, I once had a new nurse ask me how to spell "BUN". So, I spelled it for her, "B-U-N". For those who don't know, it's shorthand for blood urea nitrogen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Military Life and Issues
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top