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Old Yesterday, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
4,613 posts, read 1,153,147 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I'm here to tell you that those Article 15s can haunt you for the rest of your life. I'm retired LE and when I did nationwide background checks on NLETS I've seen Article 15 convictions show up. In fact, that church shooting in Texas a few years ago resulted in a lawsuit because the Air Force did not forward a DV Article 15 conviction for the shooter. Had they done so, it would have been entered into NCIC and the shooter would have not been able to purchase a firearm. I imagine the Air Force has fixed that problem by now and all Article 15 convictions now go to NCIC, as well as any court martial convictions. LE uses all prior convictions when classifying prisoners to determine their custody level. All criminal convictions are used to arrive at a classification score, including military convictions.
Not exactly. It’s depends on the type of Article 15.

I had an article 15 for a curfew violation in South Korea, and you can rest assured I still had my intelligence job, clearance, and it had no affect on me or any civilian employers. A court martial conviction (had I declined the article 15) would’ve been different, as that is considered a felony and will stay on your record.

However again, real life is more complex. I volunteered as court martial escort (escort prisoners to and from jail for appointments) and a guy in our unit got popped for cocaine use.

Long story short, he got kicked out the Air Force and did 4 months of military prison. But due to an administrative error he got a general discharge instead of a bad conduct discharge. So basically he’ll be able to get a job again.

Furthermore, if you hire a civilian lawyer during a court martial instead of a military one, there’s a good chance they will ensure none of that is on your record. There’s a reason court martialed high ranking officers rarely see jail time or severe punishment: good civilian lawyers. So they’re free to get their military retirement pension, lifelong access to base, and 6 figure civilian contracting job because although they were convicted, no felony will be on their record.

So again, real life military isn’t as clear cut as one would think
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Old Today, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
5,828 posts, read 3,771,984 times
Reputation: 4980
I was in the AF from 72-76. I qualified for E5 the soonest I was allowed, but had to wait about 6 months to get the promotion. During the ensuing months I became an instructor on the training base I had previously graduated from for Avionics. To be come an instructor you have to go through the Instructor Training Course. By going through that course I learned that it was obviously Instructor type personnel who wrote the tests. The reason I know this is there were questions on the tests that only someone who had gone through IT school would know the answers for.

The fix was in for their buddies, and it didn't stop there. While I was an instructor there were some E5s who let other E5s with close to 20 years TIS know what was on the test. They didn't let everybody test at the same time back then. Of course I don't know how they do it now.
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Old Today, 03:33 PM
 
17,927 posts, read 9,854,361 times
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[quote=Cruzincat;53517846]

Quote:
The fix was in for their buddies, and it didn't stop there. While I was an instructor there were some E5s who let other E5s with close to 20 years TIS know what was on the test. They didn't let everybody test at the same time back then. Of course I don't know how they do it now.
That was very much illegal even then. If caught and convicted, there would have been some jail time involved.

We had a suspicion of that in my unit in 76. A bunch of us were interrogated by the OSI. I discovered about ten years later who the OSI had planted undercover in the unit after that.
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Old Today, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
5,828 posts, read 3,771,984 times
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I realized at that time that even with max test results, the TIS and TIG stacked against me, would prevent me from ever getting another promotion, for many years. I liked what I was doing, but about the same time I found out that if I stayed for the rest of my original enlistment, I would not be able to get my job back from when I enlisted. Even the Union wouldn't support me. So I asked for and got a financial hardship discharge. That was after Vietnam had ended and they were "downsizing" the military, so it was mutually beneficial.
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