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Old 12-08-2018, 01:53 PM
 
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The Air Force was once part of the Army. The Naval Academy graduates Navy and Marine officers. Why couldn’t the Air Force officers have gone to West Point?
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Old 12-08-2018, 01:57 PM
Status: "Tinsel, not just for decoration" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Likely because the Air Corps was split off from the Army and became a separate branch. The Marines are still nominally a part of the Department of the Navy and is not technically separate.
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Old 12-08-2018, 02:34 PM
 
Location: SW OK (AZ Native)
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Doctrinally the Army and Air Force are two very different services with two very different missions. Since all fixed wing combat power was removed from the Army in 1947, the Army has focused on tactical missions, and the Air Force on both tactical and strategic missions. Correspondingly, their academic emphasis is more about the missions of each service.
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Old 12-08-2018, 03:47 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
The Air Force was once part of the Army. The Naval Academy graduates Navy and Marine officers. Why couldn’t the Air Force officers have gone to West Point?
The Marine Corps still falls under the Dept of Navy. Air Force doesn't. The Air Force uses the Academy to grow Fighter Pilots- something not prevalent in the Army. Army and Air Force culture are TOTALLY different from each other.
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Old 12-09-2018, 10:56 AM
PFM
 
Location: Endicott, NY
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The Key West Agreement designated which forms of air power were to go to each service. The Air Force was allocated most of the tactical and strategic air power that would go to support the Army and control the airspace, hence the need for a separate Academy that would focus on air operations.
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Old 12-09-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Why couldn’t the Air Force officers have gone to West Point?
Because they are not U.S. Army...

The U.S Air Force Academy was established April 1, 1954, the culmination of an idea years in the making. Airpower leaders, long before the Air Force was a separate service, argued that they needed a school dedicated to war in the air, to train Airmen. After September 1947, when the Air Force was established as a separate service, this idea finally had the legitimacy of the new service behind it.

In 1948, the Air Force appointed a board, later named the Stearns-Eisenhower Board for its chairmen, to study existing military academies and the options for an Air Force academy. Their conclusions were strongly put: the Air Force needed its own school; they additionally recommended at least 40 percent of future officers be service academy graduates.

After Congress passed a bill establishing the Air Force Academy, the secretary of the Air Force appointed a commission to recommend a location. After traveling 21,000 miles and considering hundreds of sites, the commission recommended Colorado Springs as its first choice. The secretary agreed and the purchasing of the thousands of acres began. The state of Colorado contributed $1 million to the purchase of the land.

On July 11, 1955, the same year construction on the Academy began in Colorado Springs, the first class of 306 men was sworn-in at a temporary site, Lowry Air Force Base in Denver. Lieutenant Gen. Hubert R. Harmon, a key figure in the development of early plans for an Academy, was recalled from retirement by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to become the first Academy superintendent.

The rest is history...

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 12-09-2018 at 12:32 PM..
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Old 12-09-2018, 04:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post

The U.S Air Force Academy was established April 1, 1954, the culmination of an idea years in the making. Airpower leaders, long before the Air Force was a separate service, argued that they needed a school dedicated to war in the air, to train Airmen. After September 1947, when the Air Force was established as a separate service, this idea finally had the legitimacy of the new service behind it.

In 1948, the Air Force appointed a board, later named the Stearns-Eisenhower Board for its chairmen, to study existing military academies and the options for an Air Force academy. Their conclusions were strongly put: the Air Force needed its own school; they additionally recommended at least 40 percent of future officers be service academy graduates.

After Congress passed a bill establishing the Air Force Academy, the secretary of the Air Force appointed a commission to recommend a location. After traveling 21,000 miles and considering hundreds of sites, the commission recommended Colorado Springs as its first choice. The secretary agreed and the purchasing of the thousands of acres began. The state of Colorado contributed $1 million to the purchase of the land.

On July 11, 1955, the same year construction on the Academy began in Colorado Springs, the first class of 306 men was sworn-in at a temporary site, Lowry Air Force Base in Denver. Lieutenant Gen. Hubert R. Harmon, a key figure in the development of early plans for an Academy, was recalled from retirement by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to become the first Academy superintendent.

The rest is history...
and the CHAIR FORCE was born!
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Old 12-09-2018, 04:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
and the CHAIR FORCE was born!
Wonder if they earn a masters degree in golf?
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
The Air Force was once part of the Army. The Naval Academy graduates Navy and Marine officers. Why couldn’t the Air Force officers have gone to West Point?
Because they are not the army. They produce AIR FORCE officers. The USMC is part of the Dept. of the Navy.
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:24 PM
Status: "Tinsel, not just for decoration" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Just as a note, all the Academies have a handful of graduates who cross commission every year (that's not counting the USNA Navy/Marine commissions, they're a separate case).
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