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Old 04-10-2019, 11:29 AM
 
11,027 posts, read 8,117,184 times
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https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=...&v=CgcqltC9fUs
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Old 04-10-2019, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
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I was in the USN Submarine Service when the Thresher sank. She was attached to SubDevGrp (Submarine Development Group) 2 in New London CT as was my boat (USS Hardhead SS365) at the time. I had some friends that plunged to their death on her.

While many questions remain unanswered one that lingers in my mind is what was she doing operating in 8,000 feet of water, especially on a test dive having just coming out of the yard? Her test depth is confidential but I assure you, it was nowhere near the depth she was operating in.

RIP
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Old 04-10-2019, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,889 posts, read 44,179,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
I was in the USN Submarine Service when the Thresher sank. She was attached to SubDevGrp (Submarine Development Group) 2 in New London CT as was my boat (USS Hardhead SS365) at the time. I had some friends that plunged to their death on her.

While many questions remain unanswered one that lingers in my mind is what was she doing operating in 8,000 feet of water, especially on a test dive having just coming out of the yard? Her test depth is confidential but I assure you, it was nowhere near the depth she was operating in.

RIP

I think they ended up going a lot deeper than they intended to, but, yeah, it would make some sense to do sea trials in water shallow enough that if you had a problem and ended up on the bottom, you would not be at nearly crush depth, and a rescue operation, at least, could be reasonably attempted.


From what I have read, likely some seawater piping had been soldered or brazed improperly, and it let go at a joint. Depending on the diameter of the pipe, and how complete the break is, if this happens, whoever is "driving" the boat, and damage control, need to get a lot of things right, right now, or you end up on the bottom. Taking on seawater not only adds weight and makes the boat sink faster and further than you intended, it can short out electrical equipment that you have to have working to be able to save yourself.


RIP. A lot was learned. Uncle Rickover kicked some *** and took some names. Subsafe was developed. The problem has not repeated itself.
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Old 04-11-2019, 06:01 PM
 
4,962 posts, read 2,127,927 times
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I remember this......very sad. Salute to the sailors who gave the full measure......
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,432 posts, read 48,815,978 times
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'Hand salute'
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Old 04-11-2019, 07:34 PM
 
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Wow, hadn’t thought of this in ages. I was haunted by this story as a child. The title of the thread hit me rather suddenly. Sadly I don’t remember any real details of the event, only that I was so affected by it all. I wonder...
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:39 PM
 
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Oh sorry tang. I spent a few years at the Subase in Groton and became very fond of those crazy Submariners.
I follow the base fb page and this came up.
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Old Yesterday, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
9,576 posts, read 5,277,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
I was in the USN Submarine Service when the Thresher sank. She was attached to SubDevGrp (Submarine Development Group) 2 in New London CT as was my boat (USS Hardhead SS365) at the time. I had some friends that plunged to their death on her.

While many questions remain unanswered one that lingers in my mind is what was she doing operating in 8,000 feet of water, especially on a test dive having just coming out of the yard? Her test depth is confidential but I assure you, it was nowhere near the depth she was operating in.

RIP

Speculation mind you, but maybe there was sufficient Soviet shipping (ie, AGI) that TPTB then wanted sufficient water so they could not observe a boat just out of the yards. So they sent the Thresher outside the coastal shipping traffic, out beyond the 100 fathom curve (where once off the continental shelf, depth increases quite rapidly).


Looking at mindsets around things like Texas Tower 4 (and that disaster) and history of US-USSR relations at the time, https://2001-2009.state.gov/r/pa/ho/pubs/fs/85895.htm and remembering the shock I read about the Thresher's loss (ie, submarines had been lost before but the Thresher was the new technology and how could that be lost?), maybe TPTB wanted to make sure that no one was close enough to see.


Mind you, just speculating.
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Old Yesterday, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
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We lost another one in the South Atlantic near the Azores. The Scorpion was likely a collision with a Soviet sub. Those are the only two nuclear subs we have lost. The Russians have likely lost more than two. Their most famous was the Kursk.
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Old Yesterday, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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K-8: A Project 627 November-class submarine was lost on April 11, 1970 while being towed in rough seas following a fire on board.
The submarine's crew was initially evacuated to a surface vessel, but 52 re-boarded the surfaced submarine for a towing operation.
All 52 sailors died when the submarine flooded and sank, for total losses of 60 crew when counting the 8 who perished on April 8 in the initial fire.
Location: Bay of Biscay, 490 kilometres (260 nmi) northwest of Spain in the North Atlantic Ocean.

K-27: The only Project 645 submarine (a variant of the Project 627 November-class submarine, with liquid metal cooled reactors),
On September 6, 1982, the Soviet Navy scuttled it in shallow water (108 ft (33 m)) in the Kara Sea after sealing the reactor compartment.

K-429: A Project 670A Charlie I-class sub sank twice, once at sea from flooding during a test dive 23 June 1983, 16 crew lost their lives.
then two years later, from flooding at her moorings.

K-219: A Project 667A Yankee I-class sub was damaged by a fire in a missile tube and explosion on October 3, 1986.
It then sank suddenly while being towed after all surviving crewmen had transferred off. Six crew members were killed.
Location: 950 kilometres (510 nmi) east of Bermuda in the North Atlantic Ocean.

K-278 Komsomolets: The only Mike-class sub built sank due to a raging fire April 7, 1989.
All but five crewmen evacuated prior to sinking.
A total of 42 crew died, many from smoke inhalation and exposure to the cold waters of the Barents Sea, while 27 crew members survived.

K-141 Kursk: The Oscar II-class sub sank in the Barents Sea on August 12, 2000 after an explosion in the torpedo compartment.
All 118 men on board were lost. All except the bow section was salvaged.

K-159: Left to rust for 14 years after being decommissioned,
this Soviet-era November-class submarine sank in the Barents Sea on August 28, 2003, when a storm ripped away the pontoons necessary to keep it afloat under tow.
Of the ten man salvage crew on board, nine men died in the accident.
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