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Old 02-08-2009, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,238 posts, read 1,669,133 times
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Default Veterans May Now Salute

I have just received my winter issue of the newsletter of Freedom Team Salute, an organization of Army vets and it has an article stating that Vets and active duty military not in uniform can now render the military salute instead of placing our hand over our heart during the Pledge of Allegiance, the National Anthem and hoisting, lowering, and passing of the flag.
I know it isn't much, but I will be so proud to be able to salute again and I hope there are others out there who feel the same way.
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Old 02-08-2009, 03:31 PM
 
2,176 posts, read 4,449,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masonsdaughter View Post
I have just received my winter issue of the newsletter of Freedom Team Salute, an organization of Army vets and it has an article stating that Vets and active duty military not in uniform can now render the military salute instead of placing our hand over our heart during the Pledge of Allegiance, the National Anthem and hoisting, lowering, and passing of the flag.
I know it isn't much, but I will be so proud to be able to salute again and I hope there are others out there who feel the same way.
I think that passed in late 06 or maybe early 07...Never really understood how anyone can dictate civilian "customs and courtesies". If a plumber who has never had any military involvement and wants to render a salute during pledge of allegiance, would it bother anyone? And if it did bother someone and they spoke to the plumber, yet the plumber refuses to "un"-render his salute, what next?
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Where there is too much snow!
5,813 posts, read 7,169,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masonsdaughter View Post
I have just received my winter issue of the newsletter of Freedom Team Salute, an organization of Army vets and it has an article stating that Vets and active duty military not in uniform can now render the military salute instead of placing our hand over our heart during the Pledge of Allegiance, the National Anthem and hoisting, lowering, and passing of the flag.
I know it isn't much, but I will be so proud to be able to salute again and I hope there are others out there who feel the same way.
I always have, but thank you for the article anyway. God Bless you .
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Old 02-08-2009, 04:20 PM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
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The difference would be when wearing a cover (cap).

The choice is to remove the cap and place over the heart (civilian) or in the case of a VET who has served in the Military can render a Military salute... either way would be correct.

With no cap or cover the hand is placed over the heart.

KOREA Veteran... Steve
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Old 02-09-2009, 09:45 AM
 
1,492 posts, read 4,469,009 times
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At Ft. Jackson before the presentation of colors they made the announcement for non-uniformed military and veterans that they are now allowed to salute.

Being former Marine- we don't salute unless we have a cover on.

So should former Marines salute while not covered? Just felt weird to.



Rules for Rendering Hand Salute of U.S. Flag



New Law Allows Retirees and Vets to Salute Flag The National Defense Authorization Act of 2008 contained an amendment to allow un-uniformed servicemembers, military retirees, and veterans to render a hand salute during the hoisting, lowering, or passing of the U.S. flag. The amendment does not address saluting the flag during the playing of the national anthem, pledge of allegiance, honors (i.e. Taps), or any other saluting situations.
Excerpt from H.R. 4986:

SEC. 594. CONDUCT BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES AND VETERANS OUT OF UNIFORM DURING HOISTING, LOWERING, OR PASSING OF UNITED STATES FLAG.
Section 9 of title 4, United States Code, is amended by striking “all persons present” and all that follows through the end of the section and inserting the following: “all persons present in uniform should render the military salute. Members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute. All other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, or if applicable, remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Citizens of other countries present should stand at attention. All such conduct toward the flag in a moving column should be rendered at the moment the flag passes.”

Last edited by VegasGrace; 02-09-2009 at 09:55 AM..
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,310 posts, read 21,032,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheJagMan View Post
I think that passed in late 06 or maybe early 07...Never really understood how anyone can dictate civilian "customs and courtesies". If a plumber who has never had any military involvement and wants to render a salute during pledge of allegiance, would it bother anyone? And if it did bother someone and they spoke to the plumber, yet the plumber refuses to "un"-render his salute, what next?
I think that would definitely bother some. I had a Vietnam-era Marine veteran jump all over me for wearing a surplus woodland camo t-shirt into a bar after a duck hunt. I should have saluted him, that would have driven him over the edge.
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Old 02-10-2009, 08:46 AM
 
1,492 posts, read 4,469,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasGrace View Post
At Ft. Jackson before the presentation of colors they made the announcement for non-uniformed military and veterans that they are now allowed to salute.

Being former Marine- we don't salute unless we have a cover on.

So should former Marines salute while not covered? Just felt weird to.



Rules for Rendering Hand Salute of U.S. Flag



New Law Allows Retirees and Vets to Salute Flag The National Defense Authorization Act of 2008 contained an amendment to allow un-uniformed servicemembers, military retirees, and veterans to render a hand salute during the hoisting, lowering, or passing of the U.S. flag. The amendment does not address saluting the flag during the playing of the national anthem, pledge of allegiance, honors (i.e. Taps), or any other saluting situations.
Excerpt from H.R. 4986:

SEC. 594. CONDUCT BY MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES AND VETERANS OUT OF UNIFORM DURING HOISTING, LOWERING, OR PASSING OF UNITED STATES FLAG.
Section 9 of title 4, United States Code, is amended by striking “all persons present” and all that follows through the end of the section and inserting the following: “all persons present in uniform should render the military salute. Members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute. All other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, or if applicable, remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Citizens of other countries present should stand at attention. All such conduct toward the flag in a moving column should be rendered at the moment the flag passes.”
Bumping for any Marine/former Marine to answer- would you salute w/o uniform? Or would you still just stand at attention w/ hand over heart?
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Old 02-10-2009, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,238 posts, read 1,669,133 times
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From what the article said, the salute is acceptable during the National Anthem and Pledge of allegiance. I think , from the article this was changed. I hope I have not posted erroneous information. If so this article is wrong.
The military salute was reserved for those in uniform on active duty. It was a courtesy reserved for those who were actively serving the nation or flag. Someone who salutes without earning that right yet does it anyway is simply showing disrespect to the country, the flag, and anyone who has earned the right. I can see where this would upset a lot of vets.
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Old 02-10-2009, 05:50 PM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
5,199 posts, read 9,921,674 times
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Good subject matter fellow vets.

I have both a WW11 and a Korean Veteran Cap. When wearing either one I would render the Military salute when called for...while wearing a regular baseball cap...would remove and place hand over the heart with cap pointing to my left shoulder. Hope thats okay with everybody. Steve
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Old 02-10-2009, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
10,782 posts, read 14,516,391 times
Reputation: 5334
Steve, Just where is the heart? I see people with their hand everywhere except over the heart - even in Congress. It makes me wonder who taught them what?
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