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Old 03-11-2009, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Hawaii/Alabama
1,497 posts, read 2,823,261 times
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13 for the Army? Boy things have changed. When I went through basic in '85 it was 16 minimum. Hopefully the OP will realize that just because she does a 'push up' does not mean that they will all be counted. The form must be perfect. I know of one girl who did 45 'push ups' and had only 7 that actually counted. The same goes for sit ups, only the run does not have a proper 'form'- as long as you pass the finish line in the minimum time it will count.
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Old 03-16-2009, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Midwest
3,048 posts, read 6,355,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melaniej65 View Post
13 for the Army? Boy things have changed. When I went through basic in '85 it was 16 minimum. Hopefully the OP will realize that just because she does a 'push up' does not mean that they will all be counted. The form must be perfect. I know of one girl who did 45 'push ups' and had only 7 that actually counted. The same goes for sit ups, only the run does not have a proper 'form'- as long as you pass the finish line in the minimum time it will count.
Exactly. Form is an absolute requirement for your pushup or situp to be good, and counted.

I was battalion master fitness trainer, and as such I organized and officiated the semi-annual PT tests.
I instituted videotaping because I couldn't be everywhere at once, and I couldn't always trust the scorers to not fudge for their buddies or gig people they didn't like.

If your pushup and situp form are perfect, it's hard for anyone to argue you haven't done them.

The OP's person of interest should get the recruiter to give her the data on PT tests.

When I was in, a score of 60 was required to pass and IIRC 50 had recently been instituted for BCT (basic) because American kids are fat and out of shape and if 60 was the basic training graduation requirement, very few would get out of basic.

The best advice for the person considering military service, in this case the army, is get in shape and learn to do pushups and situps to form. And make sure you can run two miles in your allocated time without dying or throwing your guts up all over the track.
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Old 03-16-2009, 04:34 PM
 
180 posts, read 535,795 times
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I'm a 41 year old female and I can do 25-30 to the floor, on my toes. More if I can stop in between. Hard to believe the military would only make you do one, and if it's on the knees that's REALLY a slam dunk. I could easily run two miles, but I'm just too durn old to sign up (o darn).
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Old 03-17-2009, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Indy
663 posts, read 2,522,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melaniej65 View Post
13 for the Army? Boy things have changed. When I went through basic in '85 it was 16 minimum.
A few years ago they changed the standards. It's now easier to pass in the 18 year old age group and also easier to get 100 per event. However, it's harder to get 100 in the 27-32 age group.

Example age 18 male push-up 100 points = 71 repetitions
Example age 28 male push-up 100 points = 77 repetitions

To the OP - National Guard Reserves? Are you sure about that? The National Guard reserves are those who volunteer to help once the local national guard unit deploys. Originally they were supposed to take over the armories once a unit leaves but now from what I see they mostly just help with the deployment/redeployment process. These people do not have to go to basic, get an mos or anything like that. They are also unpaid.
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Old 03-17-2009, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Indy
663 posts, read 2,522,837 times
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Originally Posted by featherz View Post
I'm a 41 year .... I could easily run two miles, but I'm just too durn old to sign up (o darn).
Ha, max age is 41 to enlist
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Old 03-21-2009, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Midwest
3,048 posts, read 6,355,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zig'sbird View Post
A few years ago they changed the standards. It's now easier to pass in the 18 year old age group and also easier to get 100 per event. However, it's harder to get 100 in the 27-32 age group.

Example age 18 male push-up 100 points = 71 repetitions
Example age 28 male push-up 100 points = 77 repetitions

To the OP - National Guard Reserves? Are you sure about that? The National Guard reserves are those who volunteer to help once the local national guard unit deploys. Originally they were supposed to take over the armories once a unit leaves but now from what I see they mostly just help with the deployment/redeployment process. These people do not have to go to basic, get an mos or anything like that. They are also unpaid.
I was still in when the new standards kicked. They clearly discriminate against older soldiers. I guess the bureaucrats in washington got sick of seeing all those 300+ PT test scores from old goats like me, and decided to reinvent the wheel.

I have never heard of national guard reserves. I presume the OP was getting the NG and the reserves mixed up.

BTW, where is the OP?
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Old 03-21-2009, 08:29 PM
 
Location: El Paso, TX
3,261 posts, read 3,647,583 times
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I have a system that should help her in doing push-ups. When my daughter was asked by West Point when in High School, she contemplated going.

I trained her for the PT test. In the beginning she could not do one full push-up.

What I did is put three chairs, one for each hand and one for the two feet. I had her go further down as if going below the floor level is was on the floor. I held her body with my arms on ther waist and she had to do push-ups with me assistance. Little by little she was getting better until she could do push-ups on her own.

Eventually she was able to get good at it.

It take time but it can be done.

She decided to attend UTEP though and that was just as fine with me.

You have a great day.
El Amigo
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Old 03-22-2009, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Midwest
3,048 posts, read 6,355,663 times
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^^ Glad it worked.

Another thing about pushups, and situps too.

You can develop a fairly powerful pushup headache if you take training too fast. The unconditioned neck muscles used in pushups and situps, when strained, can lead to nasty headaches.
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