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Old 02-26-2018, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,215 posts, read 42,268,245 times
Reputation: 11143

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rdnkyamaha View Post
Can you get a dishonorable discharge in boot camp. I was suffering from nose bleeds. I was discharged. When I got my dd214 it said dishonorable . This was 1991.
OK, I am not a Jag man, nor do I play one on TV. But. I would think what you got was a medical discharge.

That's pretty extreme for just nose bleeds though. I mean, what, did your nose bleed all the time when you were in boot camp? Did you have frequent nose bleeds before you went in?
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Old 02-26-2018, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Middletown, DE
131 posts, read 62,146 times
Reputation: 378
A dishonorable discharge is a punitive discharge that is part of sentencing after conviction of a very serious crime in a general court martial. Simple AWOL (or UA in Navy parlance) is not a crime, and wouldn't result in a court martial or dishonorable discharge. But desertion, depending on the circumstances, certainly could. As another poster pointed out, the OP either isn't telling the whole story, or got some other form of a less than honorable discharge, but not a dishonorable.

Receiving a dishonorable discharge is basically the same thing as a felony conviction in a civilian criminal court. It's not going to be upgraded or reclassified by some administrative application. Only a successful appeal of the criminal conviction would do that. It has essentially the same effect on your life as a felony conviction and disqualifies you from all VA benefits.

Last edited by BigDog811; 02-26-2018 at 07:38 PM..
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Old 02-27-2018, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Montana
1,716 posts, read 1,502,465 times
Reputation: 5647
I had a basic training command in the 90's, and if you had not completed basic and AIT, you were given an "uncharacterized" discharge, unless there is/was a criminal act (not AWOL or UA - but an actual Federal or state crime committed).

If the OP has a dishonorable discharge, he likely did something illegal (serious felony) before entry, or during basic training, and the military turned him over to civilian authorities, and he was convicted, or he did time at Leavenworth after a court martial, and then was released, and forgot to mention that in his post. Either way, JAG was involved, so the OP knows the reason, and is choosing not to share that information.

In my experience (multiple commands) it is very difficult to put some one out under "other than honorable" and a "BCD" is next to impossible without a serious misdemeanor or felony conviction to justify it. Dishonorable discharges are earned, not given...
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Old 02-27-2018, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
808 posts, read 464,551 times
Reputation: 2159
Quote:
Originally Posted by grmngrl8203 View Post
I went into the Navy at 18 to get away from my some stuff at home. I didn't like it so I went AWOL at the age of 20. I went back after a couple of weeks and received a dishonorable discharge. 6 years later I figured out how stupid and immature that was and how it affects me now. I have heard there is a way to petition to get it changed to an other than honorable discharge. Can you do it, is this hard to do, and how do you do it?
Sorry to seem rude, but you are leaving out relevant parts of your story. It is your private issue and you may not wish to elaborate, which is understandable. Whether or not your punishment was just, fair, or appropriate is a significant element in any appeal you might make, but this forum isn't going to get you there.

You were either convicted in a court martial or the Navy made a clerical error in recording your discharge. Not much possible in between. You went from coming back after a "couple of weeks" to a DD, but there are some serious things that no one would forget that had to happen in between unless simply an unlikely clerical mistake.

The Navy cannot issue you a DD for what you describe in your OP. If you ran off during an alert/muster, while you were standing watch, getting ready to ship to combat zone....now those elements will bring the special rules to try and convict you at the felony-level; we can only guess based on your post.

Start by searching the internet "how to appeal a dishonorable discharge".
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Old 02-28-2018, 08:10 PM
 
5,873 posts, read 2,399,447 times
Reputation: 3721
Quote:
Originally Posted by elamigo View Post
I believe there is a Board of Military Review. I may be wrong. I have not read on that for a while. Just contact a navy office and they will tell you how to work on it.
However, I agree that once it is on your record, it may not be impossible but it is an uphill battle.

If you plan to do that, you better have a very good reason with good supporting documentation to get it upgraded.

It is sad to me when I keep telling my Soldiers to think very hard in doing stupid things like that and yet they decide to do it. In today's world, those things can hunt people for the rest of their live. If you are not successful in getting it upgraded, all I can tell you is to make sure you have a very clean record at all times, work hard in improving your life like making sure you attend college, do community service, have a good credit record, a good employment record, etc. and you still have a chance to minimize the negative impact for future employment. Also, get a good network of friends and spread a good reputation as a reliable and honest individual wherever you go. Do have a good network of people that have connections in the business world and can give a good word for you.

However, the best and safest way is to simply start your own business where no one can fire you from.

It is not the end of the world. You just need to be positive and make it work for you. Also, wherever you go and you must say why you went AWOL, simply be honest. Do not make any excuses. Just say what you just said, "It was a stupid mistake, not excuses".

Good luck.

You have great day.
El Amigo
Buzz Aldrin could not get a job as a NASA tour guide through USA jobs ..... so I am not sure discharge type matters at all in todays world. Make sure you can do something cool and then fleece the **** out anyone who wants said skill or product. Focus your time on things that yield the highest dollars.

I doubt anyone cared about the discharge status of the guys that built the sidewinder missile.

I would not even bring it up in a job interview and in fact I dont think you even have to bring it up applying for a federal job because you were in less than 180 days. I would just omit it and pretend like it didnt happen, if someone does an in depth back ground check you probably wont even know about it anyways and your application will be tossed out just like the other 300 applications without dishonorable discharges lol.

Remember once you have a desirable niche make sure you cash out, high 6 figure/7 figure contracts etc.

My plan is to get a govt job and then if my skills are in very high demand later on I will say 3 millon to get me to quit my govt job and then I can come to work for you as a shi**y at will employee. The key is to minimize your bills and liabilities while maximizing your skills and value and then make sure who ever wants it pays dearly for those skills and products. If the scoff you walk, its that simple, make sure your getting retire well in a short period of time money.

I wonder how much the guy who invented the machine gun cashed in for? He said that he wanted to invent it so that he could get rich off of Europeans killing each other.
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Old 03-04-2018, 05:36 AM
 
1,599 posts, read 663,570 times
Reputation: 2691
Quote:
Originally Posted by WVREDLEG View Post
Sorry to seem rude, but you are leaving out relevant parts of your story. It is your private issue and you may not wish to elaborate, which is understandable. Whether or not your punishment was just, fair, or appropriate is a significant element in any appeal you might make, but this forum isn't going to get you there.

You were either convicted in a court martial or the Navy made a clerical error in recording your discharge. Not much possible in between. You went from coming back after a "couple of weeks" to a DD, but there are some serious things that no one would forget that had to happen in between unless simply an unlikely clerical mistake.

The Navy cannot issue you a DD for what you describe in your OP. If you ran off during an alert/muster, while you were standing watch, getting ready to ship to combat zone....now those elements will bring the special rules to try and convict you at the felony-level; we can only guess based on your post.

Start by searching the internet "how to appeal a dishonorable discharge".
This^
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Old 03-06-2018, 01:29 PM
 
5,873 posts, read 2,399,447 times
Reputation: 3721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuck's Dad View Post
I had a basic training command in the 90's, and if you had not completed basic and AIT, you were given an "uncharacterized" discharge, unless there is/was a criminal act (not AWOL or UA - but an actual Federal or state crime committed).

If the OP has a dishonorable discharge, he likely did something illegal (serious felony) before entry, or during basic training, and the military turned him over to civilian authorities, and he was convicted, or he did time at Leavenworth after a court martial, and then was released, and forgot to mention that in his post. Either way, JAG was involved, so the OP knows the reason, and is choosing not to share that information.

In my experience (multiple commands) it is very difficult to put some one out under "other than honorable" and a "BCD" is next to impossible without a serious misdemeanor or felony conviction to justify it. Dishonorable discharges are earned, not given...
I ended up with an uncharachterized but where they get you is with the re-entry code. Not that I have had employers ever look it up or care but if you have an RE-3/4 that is basically the civilian equivalent of "not eligible for rehire".

Plus I think that general discharges can be handed out if its past 180 days of active duty and while not a BCD they dont look awesome (of course depending on the RE code).
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Old 03-08-2018, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
2,818 posts, read 3,983,590 times
Reputation: 2944
Quote:
Originally Posted by J double R View Post
FWIW, "AWOL" for less than 30 days and within US territory is considered UA (unauthorized absence) and not AWOL.. Unless there was other disciplinary action on the SVM's record, or the duty which was abandoned was directly vital to national security or classified material (ie. secret or above), then I doubt one's CO would issue a true DD.
I agree, I've known a few ex-military that went AWOL/UA that never received a DD. From what I recall a DD is only reserved for more serious crimes than just AWOL/UA.
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Old 03-10-2018, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
4,127 posts, read 982,423 times
Reputation: 5884
I know a guy who used cocaine and only got a bad-conduct discharge (lower than a dishonorable discharge). So it really shows you how serious a dishonorable disrchage is, if doing harmful drugs doesn't even meet the criteria.

Regardless, the most important thing you should've done when you went AWOL was hire a civilian lawyer with an expertise in military law. They can negotiate anything and would have helped you tremendously in lowering the punishment.

That's one of the sad things about some military folks being charged with offenses, they don't understand just how important it is to hire a civilian lawyer.
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Old 03-10-2018, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
4,127 posts, read 982,423 times
Reputation: 5884
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheJagMan View Post
It does seem strange to me that one can even get any discharge by disappearing for two weeks. Just imagine, going to your commander, request to quit, they say no, you simply don't go to work for two weeks. If that were the case, people would be at a civilian job interview..."Ya, I'm in the military, but if you hire me, I just come to work here and they'll discharge me in a couple of weeks"...
Well yeah, but the military will also throw you in jail. That robbaly won't look good for your future employer when the military police show up to arrest you.
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