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Old 08-08-2015, 08:14 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,130 posts, read 38,859,608 times
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I'm a bit leery to offer advice on PTSD... I have family and friends who have been diagnosed with PTSD. I have been screened for PTSD as the result of being involved in a civilian event. My wife and I were volunteers at a local VA hospital dealing with PTSD. PTSD is a real issue and should not be dealt with lightly.

I would have to say just being there to listen without talking might be the only advice I can give. But I am not an authority.



Good luck, and take care.

Last edited by Poncho_NM; 08-25-2015 at 07:33 AM.. Reason: Removed URL, threads merged.
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Old 08-08-2015, 08:23 PM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
24,130 posts, read 38,859,608 times
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"Combat stress and PTSD are VERY different things. Unfortunately, sometimes they look quite similar which makes them somewhat complicated."

Combat Stress Versus Post Traumatic Stress Disorder | BrainLine Military

Cmdr. Carrie Kennedy, PhD, ABPP, Navy Medicine Live
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Old 08-23-2015, 06:17 AM
 
4,159 posts, read 4,192,017 times
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Everyone gets angry and short fused after retiring. It's like the old English actor said one time. "Rise above it". I am not too keen on everyone claiming PTSD since that could come back to bite you. Just have him get a job and move on. Pack up all those old military stuff and put it into the attic. It's over.
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Old 08-23-2015, 09:16 AM
 
2,379 posts, read 4,282,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by totsuka View Post
Everyone gets angry and short fused after retiring. It's like the old English actor said one time. "Rise above it". I am not too keen on everyone claiming PTSD since that could come back to bite you. Just have him get a job and move on. Pack up all those old military stuff and put it into the attic. It's over.
Sorry - but I beg to differ. OP's SO has multiple combat tours - PTSD sounds like a really issue here.

OP - one thing that I was kinda surprised to learn about PSD is that it often doesn't get better as time goes on, it gets worse.

Many vets I know/knew that left the service and didn't stick around bases, take jobs with the DoD, or maintain friendships with others they served with seemed to get worse because they no longer had someone around who "got them". Some vets seem to do better even if they don't seek "treatment" just by doing volunteer work that keeps them connected in some way to the military community.

I think PTSD issue aside - the loss of identity can be really acute. For me, I did my 4 in the Marines and got out (no combat time). My husband did 20+ years and retired (lots of combat time). I lovd being a Marine and am proud of my service but in the grand scheme of things - it's a small part of my life and who I am. Very different for my husband.
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Old 08-23-2015, 10:22 AM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
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You can try, and in *my* case of PTSD, the biggest help was that my wife always went with me to ALL my meetings.
I wanted her there !!
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Old 08-23-2015, 02:37 PM
 
13,496 posts, read 13,968,489 times
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with a real case of PTSD you can't just pack up your military memorabilia, get a job and be cured.

ptsd doesn't go away for the most part even with counseling. all it can do is help you better deal with the memories.

it would be great if you can get him to talk about his experience or get him with a group of other vets with a shared experience. best of luck.
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Old 08-24-2015, 02:14 PM
 
4,159 posts, read 4,192,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakeneko View Post
Sorry - but I beg to differ. OP's SO has multiple combat tours - PTSD sounds like a really issue here.

OP - one thing that I was kinda surprised to learn about PSD is that it often doesn't get better as time goes on, it gets worse.

Many vets I know/knew that left the service and didn't stick around bases, take jobs with the DoD, or maintain friendships with others they served with seemed to get worse because they no longer had someone around who "got them". Some vets seem to do better even if they don't seek "treatment" just by doing volunteer work that keeps them connected in some way to the military community.

I think PTSD issue aside - the loss of identity can be really acute. For me, I did my 4 in the Marines and got out (no combat time). My husband did 20+ years and retired (lots of combat time). I lovd being a Marine and am proud of my service but in the grand scheme of things - it's a small part of my life and who I am. Very different for my husband.

I still think it has become a scam and not something I would recommend unless a person has some very serious mental problems. Even then, try something other than run to the VA and going the PTSD route.

Civilians also have that loss of id when they retire from a long career. It's part of life and the modern day tendency to claim some sort of mental illness is the wrong way to go.
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Old 08-24-2015, 08:12 PM
 
127 posts, read 111,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by totsuka View Post
I still think it has become a scam and not something I would recommend unless a person has some very serious mental problems. Even then, try something other than run to the VA and going the PTSD route.

Civilians also have that loss of id when they retire from a long career. It's part of life and the modern day tendency to claim some sort of mental illness is the wrong way to go.
I've been deployed to Iraq and also worked in an E.R. for several years. I also had that same mentality until it happened to me. PTSD is not just about memories but how the experiences change you as a person. I suggest you educate yourself before making statements like that. Unless you've been through several IED'S, picked up body parts off the side of the road or even seen a friend died infront of you, shut up...
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Old 08-24-2015, 08:56 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
11,350 posts, read 7,399,724 times
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My PTSD went away.
Medication turned the trick for me; it was treated as clinical depression, not PTSD.

Funny thing is, I was diagnosed with severe PTSD. When asked to talk about my experiences, I just could. not. speak. No words. I just froze up.

But I ran into a very smart doctor and he wanted to go the depression route. So he prescribed Effexor. It was a new medication at the time and made me nauseated at first. It doesn't do that any more.
From the time of my first pill to a "new me" was about 6 weeks. I took the medication for 9 years and very slowly got off of it about 10 years ago.
All's well.

I remember telling a friend that I felt as if there had been a party going on all this time and no one ever told me!

I will tell you this with certainty: It is NOT NECESSARY for everyone to talk about the traumatic events. There are things about me that no one knows and no one ever will. But everyone is different. Some people need to talk about it, others don't. I don't.

Everyone is right, though. It will get worse if untreated. From "the events" until "medication" was 30 years for me. 1967 was the event. 1977 was a melt down/burn out. 1987 was a melt down/divorce. Finally, in 1997, I connected some dots.......OK. I'm slow..
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Old 08-24-2015, 10:24 PM
 
2,379 posts, read 4,282,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by totsuka View Post
I still think it has become a scam and not something I would recommend unless a person has some very serious mental problems. Even then, try something other than run to the VA and going the PTSD route.

Civilians also have that loss of id when they retire from a long career. It's part of life and the modern day tendency to claim some sort of mental illness is the wrong way to go.
I can't even.

If you have never had PTSD or seen someone you love suffer with it - you can't even imagine. It's horrible to watch someone suffering from PTSD and be afraid to reach out for help because someone might think they are weak, "have serious mental problems" or be "scamming"
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