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Old 07-06-2009, 12:31 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
1,194 posts, read 3,596,860 times
Reputation: 753

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Quote:
Originally Posted by linzieco View Post
Please tell be the best PTSD centers out there! Thank you so much!!!!
I would say you need to see a person who is trained in treating PTSD patients such as the VA or immediately go to your local hospital emergency room and tell them you believe you have PTSD, why you believe you have it and you need to immediately want to see a medical doctor preferrably a Medical Psychologist....

I have learned that PTSD is developed by stress...PTSD is formed by a situation/s that we saw, was forced on us or a tragedy we either saw or were included in such as the likes seen by War. PTSD give us great fear and the most stress one can imagine forms the basics of PTSD.....

In 1984 I was treated for stress related to my military service but I was treated outside the Veterans Administration. The toll on me and my family since 1970 was so great I am not sure how I remained sane..(some would say otherwise) ...

I have no fun anymore since i got out of the military, nothing gets me excited except the most dangerous of my exploits, I have no friends, I never talk about Vietnam and what I did there until 2 years ago and I treat everyone like they are my enemy......

One of my VA clinical advisors was diagnosed as having PTSD because she was raped 15 years ago. After I served in Vietnam in the 75th Rangers in the Central Highlands for over a year, I was diagnosed with severe PTSD 2 years ago and I am seeing a Medical Doctor once a month and in a VA PTSD group every week for 2 years now.. It has helped a lot and I am most worried about my wife because I try so very hard to a regular guy and I just cannot....

I am constantly seen by VA Medical Doctors, VA clinicians and the Veterans Hospitals and I am sure if it was not for the VA help and Vietnam Vets "who have seen what I did and done what I did", I would not be alive today.

God Bless you our Veterans and our Troops. Please see someone immediatly in the area where your Veteran lives then get an appointment to see your local Veterans Service Officer so your Vet can get properly compensated ..... Keep us informed.....

..

Last edited by Synergy1; 07-06-2009 at 12:39 AM..
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Old 07-06-2009, 11:36 AM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,166 posts, read 10,479,013 times
Reputation: 3969
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synergy1 View Post
I am sure if it was not for the VA help and Vietnam Vets "who have seen what I did and done what I did", I would not be alive today.
Just because you can write/talk about it and give hope to your fellow soldier, proves to me that you now can at least cope with it.

Been there done that, my friend.
Never give up !!!
I do not care who said it first, but it worked for me.
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Old 07-14-2009, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Spring, TX
107 posts, read 359,207 times
Reputation: 77
Have your DH stalk to his doc about propranolol. This is an older blood pressure med that research found was helpful in controlling night terrors. It IS CURRENTLY being proscribed by AF and Army docs as a PSTD med.
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Old 12-16-2009, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Hawaii
1,707 posts, read 6,228,040 times
Reputation: 1049
Default Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

1. Have you felt different after returning from from a deployment?

2. Have you experienced a life threating event?

3. Have there been changes to you physical or mental health since redeploying?

4. Has a close friend or family member told you that you've changed?

If you answer yes to any of these questions do yourself and family a favor and take this short PTSD screening quiz from the Veterans Administration.


https://www.myhealth.va.gov/mhv-port...SCREENING.HTML
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Old 12-16-2009, 07:56 PM
 
409 posts, read 2,379,542 times
Reputation: 349
Not yet. I've just enlisted in the AF.:S
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Old 12-16-2009, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Hawaii
1,707 posts, read 6,228,040 times
Reputation: 1049
I've been back from Iraq for 2 years and finally realized/admitted I had a problem, that was confirmed by the VA. I don't want anyone else to suffer needlessly and to get help as soon as possible.
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Old 12-17-2009, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, Az (unfortunately still here)
2,551 posts, read 3,763,697 times
Reputation: 1521
Well, I know I'm different since I go out of the Army (ETS in 2001). I served 6 years (1995-2001). My temper is a problem these days (well, in the last 8 years), that's for sure. Just can't quite get used to this civilian life, you know (nobody comes in on time but you). That sucks and makes me mad sometimes. But I'm controlling it a lot better, in the last 4 months now, and have been sober since too. It's tough out here when your life was on a schedule and was structured everyday (for 6 years too).

I'm used to discipline, schedules, planning, and structure. You don't have any of that in the civilian world. People seem to run or walk around like a chicken with its head cut off out here. And sooner or later, I was becoming like that and nobody else liked it.

So my temper sometimes flies off the handle, in certain situations (like when someone is late, schedules change too often, and being spontaneous). I definitely can't be spontaneous much, because it was a reason why I started drinking when I became a civilian. "Hey let's go to a bar", used to be a favorite of mine (when I wanted to be too spontaneous).

I can't do that anymore, my day has to be planned and structured, for me. So, I stick to daily routines (I change a little bit, but not much everyday). It works out better and keeps me sober too.

Do you think I might have some of it?
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Old 12-17-2009, 05:30 AM
 
2,190 posts, read 6,774,327 times
Reputation: 1281
I keep PTSD at bay by venting my frustration here on C-D and yelling out "serenity now!!!"
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Old 12-17-2009, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 49,557,510 times
Reputation: 24548
I have had PTSD only for the last 55 years or so. I had it when I went to 'Nam because of a nasty alcoholic step father. I had it worse ever since but I have learned to behave, but not think or react, in a civilized manner. My response to a physical attack would be instantaneous and final.

The major manifestation is watching some crime shows on TV and thinking that when some obvious creep gives the cop a lot of crap the cop should just take the creep out to the dumpster and shoot him. When they are dealing with an obvious psychotic just consider wasting it as appropriate pest control.
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Old 12-17-2009, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Hawaii
1,707 posts, read 6,228,040 times
Reputation: 1049
Default What is PTSD

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can occur after you have been through a traumatic event. A traumatic event is something horrible and scary that you see or that happens to you. During this type of event, you think that your life or others' lives are in danger. You may feel afraid or feel that you have no control over what is happening.

Anyone who has gone through a life-threatening event can develop PTSD. These events can include:
  • Combat or military exposure
  • Child sexual or physical abuse
  • Terrorist attacks
  • Sexual or physical assault
  • Serious accidents, such as a car wreck.
  • Natural disasters, such as a fire, tornado, hurricane, flood, or earthquake.
After the event, you may feel scared, confused, or angry. If these feelings don't go away or they get worse, you may have PTSD. These symptoms may disrupt your life, making it hard to continue with your daily activities.

What is PTSD? - National Center for PTSD
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