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Old 10-16-2017, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,038 posts, read 44,094,760 times
Reputation: 15020

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsoldier1976 View Post
If that is the case it is even worse of a deal. But let's for the sake of that say it is. You get your generous E5 month's pay multiplied to a one time bonus. Considering that the typical E5 pay will be about $200.00 and your signing bonus being generous at the top end you will gross an additional $1200.00 to sign. Not much of an incentive considering the signing bonus my nephew got to sign for 6 years of active duty was $40,000.00.
Such is normal when looking at the differences between full-time military and part-time.



Quote:
... Again looking at it from the perspective of a lower enlisted soldier augmenting his household income with drill checks and annual training checks. I don't know. Call me a skeptic. But I don't see much of an incentive. Maybe because I was a full time dual status soldier and I was not eligible for any signing bonuses, I didn't see how that would have kept me in. Not having one didn't keep me staying in. What did keep me in was the fact that my family income depended upon my continued participation in the guard. It was quite an incentive and made me do things that the rank and file M-day soldier would not have considered.
I have never understood the attraction of being in the reserves.

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Old 10-16-2017, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,100 posts, read 3,690,994 times
Reputation: 4828
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Such is normal when looking at the differences between full-time military and part-time.

I have never understood the attraction of being in the reserves.


It is understandable. While I was active duty army the reservists and national guard soldiers were identifiable. From the late 60s to the late 70s the reserves didn't help their reputation much with drunkenness and whole units not ready for the assigned missions. In 1986 I joined the army reserves and found out that it was still true. 10 months of that I found I could not take it any more. I joined the national guard. It was quite different.
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,038 posts, read 44,094,760 times
Reputation: 15020
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsoldier1976 View Post
It is understandable. While I was active duty army the reservists and national guard soldiers were identifiable. From the late 60s to the late 70s the reserves didn't help their reputation much with drunkenness and whole units not ready for the assigned missions. In 1986 I joined the army reserves and found out that it was still true. 10 months of that I found I could not take it any more. I joined the national guard. It was quite different.
I only served in the Navy. I have never been at-sea with reservists. My primary exposure to reservists was when I was on shore-duty. On a Navy base you can spot reservists by their white hair. Regular Navy will be on pension long before their hair turns fully white, but reservists will have a full head of white hair before they have accumulated enough points.

I have been on pension for 16 years and my hair is still not white.
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Old 10-17-2017, 04:03 AM
 
3,185 posts, read 1,870,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I only served in the Navy. I have never been at-sea with reservists. My primary exposure to reservists was when I was on shore-duty. On a Navy base you can spot reservists by their white hair. Regular Navy will be on pension long before their hair turns fully white, but reservists will have a full head of white hair before they have accumulated enough points.

I have been on pension for 16 years and my hair is still not white.
I have been on my Navy retainer for 5 years.. No hair. Daughter did not like the little come over, and shaved it off. Been shaved clean for 5 years now.
But you are right, no reservist looks young when we worked with them.
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Old 10-19-2017, 12:37 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
3,849 posts, read 1,842,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I have never understood the attraction of being in the reserves.


Funny thing is, I've never understood the attraction of doing 20 on active duty. I had no interest in uprooting my family every 3-5 years. I didn't want my children raised as milbrats. I got to serve in my hometown and spent 20 years with a great bunch of people. I also got to fly all over the world and I was able to pick and choose my trips. And with 6000 points, my retirement check is significantly larger than yours. And since this was a part time vocation, I also had a civilian job that provides an even larger retirement check than my military retirement. In most instances, a Guard or Reserve career provides the best of both worlds, especially if you've done one or two active duty enlistments.
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Old 10-19-2017, 04:29 AM
 
3,185 posts, read 1,870,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Funny thing is, I've never understood the attraction of doing 20 on active duty. I had no interest in uprooting my family every 3-5 years. I didn't want my children raised as milbrats. I got to serve in my hometown and spent 20 years with a great bunch of people. I also got to fly all over the world and I was able to pick and choose my trips. And with 6000 points, my retirement check is significantly larger than yours. And since this was a part time vocation, I also had a civilian job that provides an even larger retirement check than my military retirement. In most instances, a Guard or Reserve career provides the best of both worlds, especially if you've done one or two active duty enlistments.
6000 points is higher paycheck than who?
A calculator would be nice to figure out pay.
I know my pastor, E9 Air Force Reserves, did a total of 34 years Reserves. His last 14 were straight active time due to Afghan and Iraq. He sais, in 2015, his pay was equal to an active duty retired E7 at 22 years.
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Old 10-19-2017, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
2,452 posts, read 3,936,171 times
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Points for traditional reservists are actually easy to figure out-although the new system is going to make it harder.

Old system:
Points/365 = years (and you need 20 in which you earned at least 50 points)
Years * 2.5% = multiplier
Highest 36 months / 36 = base
Multiplier * base = monthly check

6000 / 365 * 2.5% = 16.44 years * 2.5% = 41.1%. A 20 year active retiree from the year Submariner retired is 50%.

A further distinction is that an active retiree draws the check immediately, at 38 or 40 or 45. A reserve retirement draws it at (usually) age 60. That earlier draw is part of what attracted people to active service. 15 to 20-ish years of pulling that pension plus civilian pay can result in a decent second half of your working life, and the possibility of that is part of the attraction even at a reduced quality of lie.
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Old 10-19-2017, 05:51 AM
 
3,185 posts, read 1,870,198 times
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One correction. The 50% is really not 50 at 20. You get 50% of your last 3 years averaged.
In late 80s Congress changed it to 40% at 20. That quickly got handled and they changed it to 50% of high 3. So, even at 30 years you get 75% of your last 3 years in service averaged.
And dont forget CSB Redux, not even going to explain that nightmare.
I think Active duty retirees financially make out better. At 38, you get a check for life, indexed..
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,038 posts, read 44,094,760 times
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I have been retired for 16 years. But I am still not old enough to start getting a pension if I had been a Reservist. I retired at 42, from 42 to 60 is 18 years of paychecks I will have received that a Reservist-Retiree can not receive.

I got 50% of my base-pay [high 3]. Of course my base-pay was only a small portion of my take-home paychecks.
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:32 AM
 
3,185 posts, read 1,870,198 times
Reputation: 1358
Submariner, the check we get does pay some bills, especially mortgage. Cant complain...
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