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Old 04-12-2016, 01:23 AM
 
136 posts, read 99,545 times
Reputation: 192

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It's fun to see the changes in the city.
833 East seems to be part of the scenery already, forgot how things looked like before it was built.

Eyes on Milwaukee: 10 Images of a Changing City Urban Milwaukee
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Old 04-12-2016, 03:14 PM
 
242 posts, read 334,059 times
Reputation: 276
Thank you for posting this. I lived in MKE until I was 25, then back for a few years in my early 30's. Haven't been back to the city of MKE (just the burbs) in over ten years!
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Old 05-02-2016, 08:17 AM
 
44,746 posts, read 43,301,807 times
Reputation: 14446
Looking at the photos, my first reaction was "whoa"!!
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Old 05-02-2016, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
704 posts, read 507,630 times
Reputation: 1316
One thing that I have noticed about Milwaukee's development, compared to other cities, is that there is always a good balance between old and new. There isn't this illusion of developers controlling, leveling, and gentrifying the city. I know a lot of it has to do with the slower growth rate compared to cities like SF, Denver, Portland, etc, but it's nice to see that a city can get new stuff without it "ruining" the current environment.

Luckily we are not like Minneapolis, where they seem to completely level full city blocks of historical/interesting buildings, and replace them with atrocious glass cubes that do not fit the landscape. We know you guys want to be just like a big city...but you are trying a little too hard
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Old 05-02-2016, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Portland OR
1,856 posts, read 2,644,579 times
Reputation: 2260
It's nice to see these. Thanks for posting.

One would assume from reading so many of the posters on this site that MKE and WI in general are quickly dieing out due to governor and policies.

Nice to see evidence showing there is much melodramatic poppycock being flung about.
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Old 05-03-2016, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
1,257 posts, read 641,846 times
Reputation: 1431
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccjarider View Post
It's nice to see these. Thanks for posting.

One would assume from reading so many of the posters on this site that MKE and WI in general are quickly dieing out due to governor and policies.

Nice to see evidence showing there is much melodramatic poppycock being flung about.
That's a stretch. Even Mississippi gets new buildings here and there. That does not mean that they've pursued economic policies that are as effective as those in place in New York, for example. It just means that even with a poor economy, some businesses/developers are able to find success.

To the OP, thanks for posting. The photos were cool to see.
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Old 05-03-2016, 09:09 AM
 
32,888 posts, read 22,854,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AminWi View Post
That's a stretch. Even Mississippi gets new buildings here and there. That does not mean that they've pursued economic policies that are as effective as those in place in New York, for example. It just means that even with a poor economy, some businesses/developers are able to find success.
Yup, often despite of the misguided policies you can find some successes most everywhere.
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Old 05-03-2016, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Bay View, Milwaukee
2,087 posts, read 4,020,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
Yup, often despite of the misguided policies you can find some successes most everywhere.
The boom in Milwaukee probably has more to do with Obama's economic revival than Walker's austerity measures.
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Old 05-03-2016, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
869 posts, read 1,599,248 times
Reputation: 1469
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
One thing that I have noticed about Milwaukee's development, compared to other cities, is that there is always a good balance between old and new. There isn't this illusion of developers controlling, leveling, and gentrifying the city. I know a lot of it has to do with the slower growth rate compared to cities like SF, Denver, Portland, etc, but it's nice to see that a city can get new stuff without it "ruining" the current environment.

Luckily we are not like Minneapolis, where they seem to completely level full city blocks of historical/interesting buildings, and replace them with atrocious glass cubes that do not fit the landscape. We know you guys want to be just like a big city...but you are trying a little too hard
Great post - I agree 100% with everything you wrote. I like the way the development is taking place in Milwaukee, it seems to fit together and the city still retains it character. The Third Ward is the best example of this. Also, the pace of development is where is should be. At this pace Milwaukee could really be a gem in ten years or so, not that it's all that bad now, but it's only beginning to reach it's potential.
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Old 05-05-2016, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
1,257 posts, read 641,846 times
Reputation: 1431
Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
One thing that I have noticed about Milwaukee's development, compared to other cities, is that there is always a good balance between old and new. There isn't this illusion of developers controlling, leveling, and gentrifying the city. I know a lot of it has to do with the slower growth rate compared to cities like SF, Denver, Portland, etc, but it's nice to see that a city can get new stuff without it "ruining" the current environment.

Luckily we are not like Minneapolis, where they seem to completely level full city blocks of historical/interesting buildings, and replace them with atrocious glass cubes that do not fit the landscape. We know you guys want to be just like a big city...but you are trying a little too hard
I don't think this was always the case. Even as late as the 70's and 80's, Milwaukee was knocking down historical buildings to put up freeways and parking lots. If you get a chance, follow the Milwaukee County Historical Society on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/search/top/...ical%20society). They post historical photos of Milwaukee daily. Some of the buildings they post are still there - many are long gone, and some of those it is heartbreaking to see. I'm very glad that Milwaukee has done such a great job of late of incorporating the old with the new, too.
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