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Old 08-12-2021, 04:53 PM
 
Location: WI/MN resident
513 posts, read 402,429 times
Reputation: 1366

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Quote:
Wisconsin has grown more racially diverse over a decade of modest growth where population gains were concentrated around the state's capital city while its largest city, Milwaukee, fell to its smallest population in nearly a century, new U.S. Census data show.

The state's population grew 3.6% since 2010 to 5.9 million — lagging the national growth of 7.4% and less than half the rate of its neighbor Minnesota.

The new data also reveal a notable drop — 4% — in the number of children living in Wisconsin, forecasting consequences for the state's education systems and labor force.

The state is becoming more racially diverse with Hispanic residents growing in population by 33% and now accounting for the largest racial minority group in the state, surpassing the state's Black population.


More than a third of Wisconsin's population growth over the last decade occurred in Dane County, in and around Madison. The county grew by 15% to add more than 73,000 people — the highest county-level increase in the state — where the city of Verona experienced some of the fastest growth at 32%.

Meanwhile, the state's largest city has hit its lowest population since 1930. Milwaukee's population fell to 577,222 — a drop of about 17,000 people since 2010. Milwaukee County also saw a tiny population decrease of less than a percentage point.


Overall, population fell in about 30% of the state's counties that are largely in rural areas of the state.

The data released Thursday by the U.S. Census will be used to create new legislative and congressional maps. Wisconsin's 2nd Congressional District will need to lose more than 50,000 people under the new map because the district, which includes Dane County, grew so much in the last 10 years.
https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/...ls/8110913002/

Honestly, I was optimistic that Milwaukee would see a slight population increase from the 2010 to 2020 Census, but it vastly underperformed my expectations. Madison/Dane County actually overperformed my expectations and is clearly the only area of Wisconsin that is experiencing major population growth. I'm curious to know what this means for redistricting.
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Old 08-12-2021, 05:09 PM
 
Location: WI/MN resident
513 posts, read 402,429 times
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Regarding what this means for redistricting in Wisconsin, here is what I found according to this JSOnline article:

Quote:
Second District (Democrat Pocan). 2020 census count: 789,393; must lose roughly 52,680 people. Joe Biden won it by 40 points last year.

Eighth District (Republican Gallagher). 2020 census count: 751,967; must lose roughly 15,250 people. Donald Trump won it by 16 last year.

Fifth District (Republican Scott Fitzgerald). 2020 census count: 735,571; must gain roughly 1,140 people. Trump won it by 15.

Third District (Democrat Kind). 2020 census count: 733,584; must gain roughly 3,130 people. Trump won it by 5.

Seventh District (Republican Tom Tiffany). 2020 census count: 732,582; must gain roughly 4,130 people. Trump won it by 20.

Sixth District: (Republican Glenn Grothman). 2020 census count: 727,774; must gain roughly 8,940 people. Trump won it by 15.

First District (Republican Steil). 2020 census count: 727,452; must gain roughly 9,260 people. Trump won it by 9.

Fourth District (Democrat Moore). 2020 census count: 695,395; must gain roughly 41,320 people. Biden won it by 53.
https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/...ap/8106403002/
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Old 08-20-2021, 11:07 AM
 
2,029 posts, read 1,172,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InnovativeAmerican View Post
https://www.jsonline.com/story/news/...ls/8110913002/

Honestly, I was optimistic that Milwaukee would see a slight population increase from the 2010 to 2020 Census, but it vastly underperformed my expectations. Madison/Dane County actually overperformed my expectations and is clearly the only area of Wisconsin that is experiencing major population growth. I'm curious to know what this means for redistricting.
Lake Michigan. With climate change, get ready for growth Milwaukee and Wisconsin. Would you rather live in a desert or next to a great lake?
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Old 08-24-2021, 01:11 AM
 
111 posts, read 70,491 times
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I wonder if all of the crime is the reason? Not being from there, all I hear about the city is the crime rate, but I expect that similar to Chicago, the crime is mostly isolated to certain neighborhoods. Can anyone confirm my suspicion?
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Old 08-24-2021, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Bay View, Milwaukee
2,562 posts, read 4,954,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UniKidNow View Post
I wonder if all of the crime is the reason? Not being from there, all I hear about the city is the crime rate, but I expect that similar to Chicago, the crime is mostly isolated to certain neighborhoods. Can anyone confirm my suspicion?
Yes, that's pretty much true. Milwaukee is one of the most racially and economically segregated cities in the U.S., and that manifests itself in a very strong haves/have-nots divide. Certain kinds of crime (such as car vandalism and theft) have risen in most parts of the city, but violent crime still manifests itself unevenly. Housing prices everywhere are climbing, but prices (including rentals) have skyrocketed in the most desirable neighborhoods.

The population loss has other drivers, as well. The local economy is stagnant, the state economy is stagnant, and the regional economy is stagnant.

Some folks get weary of living in and near the city, so move to the safer (and in some cases, lower tax) suburbs, but the suburbs are also stagnant in terms of population and economic growth. I've looked and haven't found any community of 5,000 people or more in the Milwaukee metro that has seen a significant population increase (but I wasn't 100% thorough, either), and several have seen slight declines.

Empty nesters in the city and the burbs move to warmer climates, and not enough people move in to make up the difference. Milwaukee has a very high and climbing index of single people. Some of the suburbs, especially the urbanized, inner-ring suburbs, have also seen a decline in families and a rise in singles.

OTOH, Milwaukee's population loss from 2010 to 2020 was not as precipitous as it could have been--from 595,000 to 577,000. Attempts to revitalize parts of the city (esp. East Side, Downtown, Third Ward, Walkers Point, and Bay View) and develop attractive housing and retail spaces for retirees and professionals probably helped to ensure that the city's population didn't plummet more than it did.
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Old 08-24-2021, 09:20 AM
sub
 
Location: ^##
4,476 posts, read 2,521,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UniKidNow View Post
I wonder if all of the crime is the reason? Not being from there, all I hear about the city is the crime rate, but I expect that similar to Chicago, the crime is mostly isolated to certain neighborhoods. Can anyone confirm my suspicion?
Weather. Perceptions.
Crime isn't a whole lot different than many fast-growing places. It's certainly not St. Louis or Detroit bad.
The divide between the haves and have-nots doesn't seem much worse either, especially when compared to areas out west.
Winters might be more similar to Boston than Minneapolis.
I'd take it over most any sunbelt city out there. It's a lot nicer than people think.

On the downside, the racial issue is overly political. Wisconsin people tend to be very politically engaged and think all issues can be solved with politics and that all life is defined by politics.
That can be counterproductive and divisive. It's also very tiresome to those of us not used to it.
Sometimes, that junk needs to be set aside and people just need to be nice. They need to engage each other without political pretenses. Just be neighborly without being weird about it. Lose the creed-like yard signs.
Hard to do when your universe is politics.
I'd almost leave Wisconsin solely because of the political atmosphere. Sadly though, too many other places have started to play those games as well.

All-in-all, I still think Milwaukee is worth a close look to anyone interested. It has a lot of good traits.

Last edited by sub; 08-24-2021 at 09:57 AM..
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Old 08-25-2021, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sub View Post
All-in-all, I still think Milwaukee is worth a close look to anyone interested. It has a lot of good traits.

If you agree with the idea that in the next century we might experience shortage of drinking water, then Milwaukee is strategically placed very well... We have one of the biggest ponds in the world and plenty of other little ones.
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Old 08-25-2021, 07:11 AM
sub
 
Location: ^##
4,476 posts, read 2,521,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brrabbit View Post
If you agree with the idea that in the next century we might experience shortage of drinking water, then Milwaukee is strategically placed very well... We have one of the biggest ponds in the world and plenty of other little ones.
Not sure where I stand on the water shortage issue. They can find creative ways to keep the faucets on.
However, I keep thinking at some point people are going to get tired of the constant issue of where their water is going to come from.
If and when they do, Wisconsin could see an influx.
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Old 08-31-2021, 09:53 AM
 
456 posts, read 300,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Empidonax View Post
OTOH, Milwaukee's population loss from 2010 to 2020 was not as precipitous as it could have been--from 595,000 to 577,000. Attempts to revitalize parts of the city (esp. East Side, Downtown, Third Ward, Walkers Point, and Bay View) and develop attractive housing and retail spaces for retirees and professionals probably helped to ensure that the city's population didn't plummet more than it did.
I took a look at the long-term change in Milwaukee's population from the 2000 Census to the 2020 Census and created this map of citywide population change at the Census Tract level. The downtown/Brewer's Hill/Walker's Point/East Side areas gained about 12,500 people over the 20-year period which is pretty robust for a Midwestern downtown area. That area of the city actually accelerated its growth from 2010 - 2020 compared to the previous decade growing by about 8,000 (compared to 4,500 from 2000 - 2010).

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Old 09-29-2021, 01:21 PM
 
Location: WI/MN resident
513 posts, read 402,429 times
Reputation: 1366
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbcook1 View Post
I took a look at the long-term change in Milwaukee's population from the 2000 Census to the 2020 Census and created this map of citywide population change at the Census Tract level. The downtown/Brewer's Hill/Walker's Point/East Side areas gained about 12,500 people over the 20-year period which is pretty robust for a Midwestern downtown area. That area of the city actually accelerated its growth from 2010 - 2020 compared to the previous decade growing by about 8,000 (compared to 4,500 from 2000 - 2010).
Very interesting. Thanks for sharing this!
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