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Old 03-02-2007, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
27 posts, read 147,510 times
Reputation: 36

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I attended UWM for 4 semesters between the falls of 2003 and 2006. I was one of the few products of MPS at the school and it took me until the summer of 2006 to find someone else who went to my high school.

While the number of minority students may be increasing, the rate that we make up decreased every year that I was there. But that doesn't surprise me considering that the only MPS schools UWM recruits from are King and Riverside (which is partially run by UWM) while they recruit from schools in Green Bay, Madison and the Fox Valley all the time. Not only that, but there was a story in the Journal-Sentinel not too long ago about a Black prospective student being harassed by the campus police and was continually asked if he "belonged" there. The fact that the police could automatically assume that Black=not a student should tell you something... a few things actually.

And even with the examples you gave, the number of students who never leave the east side is the exception and not the rule (BTW, that Wal-Mart is by no means near the heart of the city... try finding any students who take the bus past there). UWM has a reputation as a suitcase school for a reason... the typical UWM student lives in "Milwaukee" (the upper east side is nothing but a suburb IMO) during the week and goes home for the weekend spending as little time in the city as possible. UWM also has one of the lowest graduation rates for incoming freshmen because most of them end up realizing that they can't handle city life and transfer to schools up north. They even tried to change the school's name to "Wisconsin State" last spring because a bunch of students (all from out of town, BTW) thought that having "Milwaukee" in the name made it sound too threatening.

As far as Chanecllor Santiago's "strategy," it's nothing more than an attempt to ***** UWM's resources out to corporate interests while enhancing his own reputation and further ignoring why the Wisconsin taxpayers fund a place like UWM...to serve the higher education needs of the state's urban areas.
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Old 03-03-2007, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Metro Milwaukee, WI
3,058 posts, read 8,154,652 times
Reputation: 1615
Quote:
Originally Posted by illwauk View Post
Wow @ the unapologetic racism and classism thread.
Well, congrats, because you are the one really throwing the racist bombs in this thread. Despite you saying you are a white male, you seem to have a real hatred of anything you perceive to be "white"...

Quote:
Originally Posted by illwauk View Post
Simply put, UWM and the area surrounding it is nothing but a bunch of pompous white kids from places like Green Bay and the Fox Valley
Gee, that isn't a racist, stereotyping, or generalizing statement now is it? The majority of violent or raucous incidents at Mayfair Mall are with young, black males, but that doesn't mean that all black males are "troublemakers" or "gunholders" (in the case of the gun that fell off the top floor to the bottom). Similarly, I am sure a school the size of UWM has some pompous folks of all colors...all sects of society do...are you sure you aren't putting yourself a bit into that category though??

Quote:
Originally Posted by illwauk View Post
who want to pretend to live in the "big city," but don't actually want to deal with any of the things that comes with the territory of being in a place like Milwaukee (i.e. living near Blacks/Latinos and people who don't make 50,000/year). Not to mention the rate of minorites at UWM has been declining for at least the past 5 years.

Basically, Milwaukee is a majority-minority city (people of color outnumber whites). The north side is predominantly Black, the south side is predmoninantly Hispanic. The east side (which includes UWM) is mostly white out-of-towners who actually believe that if they dare go anywhere past the locust street bridge they'll be shot on site. This is news to me since I'm white, grew up in a mostly Black neighborhood near Marquette and never had any problems.
I just don't get your point. So the north side is predominantly black. The south side is predominantly Hispanic. So what if the east side is predominantly white??? Why don't you get on the black populace for want to keep to themselves?? Or the Hispanics for staying "on the south side?" Yes, pockets of similar-backgrounded people in areas tend to stick together. This isn't necessarily right or wrong...it just is how it is.

Also, you say you grew up in a "black neighborhood near Marquette"...ummm...if I am not mistaken, there are tons of out-of-town, well-to-do white folks that attend Marquette as well. Marquette is more expensive to attend than UWM. I guess they are a special sect of white folks who aren't "afraid" like black folks are??

Quote:
Originally Posted by illwauk View Post
In other words, I wouldn't suggest Milwaukee for someone like you. Most of the students at UWM deal with the "trauma" of having to see more than 5 people of color everyday by going back up north every weekend. Since you're from Arizona, that option wouldn't be open to you and you'd have to actually sit around and deal with what you see as the city's "dirtyness."
Man, you might fall over soon - that chip on your shoulder is so large. First off, I thought you said that people at UWM don't see "people of color" at all because they are too afraid to??

Next...have you ever been outside of Wisconsin? Don't you realize that Arizona has more Hispanics per capita than Milwaukee will ever? I am a white guy - former Milwaukeean who lives in New Mexico (right next to AZ) - and there are more Hispanics in this region generally than "gringos"...and yes, for whites, that is OK! Unlike you, they do not have chips on their shoulders, and neither do the whites...we just live in a same region. Milwaukee is much more full of people with this attitude than you seem to realize.

Sorry, just because a kid may be from an area that is predominantly white and may socialize more with white kids does not instantly make him a villian...and yes, he/she is still entitled to live in a "big city"...just because they may not want to live on 25th and Wisconsin.

I have a two friends - the husband is white and the wife is black...with two children. They lived at roughly 43rd and Hampton after college. One night, some thugs stuck a gun to the face of the husband as he was getting out of a car with his 2 year-old son. They decided after that - with his wife's urging - to move to Wauwatosa. I suppose you think there is something wrong with that. Somehow I don't though. That isn't racism or "not wanting to deal with big city living"...that is just looking out for yourself and your family as you see fit.
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Old 03-04-2007, 06:13 AM
Yac
 
4,331 posts, read 3,673,315 times
Like I said in the other thread that has wandered in a similar direction, calm down, please.
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Old 04-08-2007, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Bay View, Milwaukee
1,319 posts, read 2,468,746 times
Reputation: 1252
I think Milwaukee is a great city to live in, and you should have no problem finding a good place to live near the UWM campus. UWM is somewhat more racially and ethnically diverse than some people here would have you believe. It's true that UWM is not fully representative of the city's ethnic/racial profile, but the situation has been improving, and you can still get a good education at universities that aren't socioculturally perfect.

UWM does have a mostly positive impact on the surrounding neighborhood and on the city in general, though some people seem to think that the school should be "solving the city's problems." That's a big responsibility for an institution whose primary concern is to educate students in various academic and professional fields. Thousands of people attend UWM and find that the school's community outreach is just fine and improving.

Milwaukee's architectural foundation and urban design was developed mostly in the 1800s, so yes, there are areas where some buildings look spent. You'll find the same thing in all Great Lakes cities, including Chicago. This deterioration is not all-encompassing, though; some neighborhoods have taken very good care of their architectural heritage. But don't forget that decades ago, Milwaukee was home to close to a million people; the population is now less than 600,000. When there's a net loss of a couple hundred thousand people in a city, and when the rest of the metro continues to grow as it spreads out, some buildings in the city will get neglected. Many other cities have seen this happen, even San Francisco and NYC at different moments in their history.

Frankly, one of the reasons I like Milwaukee is that there are well-preserved, interesting neighborhoods, and I also like the authenticity of the neighborhoods that are aging less gracefully. If I wanted a perfect-looking and new-looking place to live, I could move to my parents' retirement community in Florida. But I prefer Milwaukee because it's culturally interesting, has pleasant neighborhoods, and has a rough-around-the-edges beauty in some of the older parts.
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Old 04-08-2007, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Bay View, Milwaukee
1,319 posts, read 2,468,746 times
Reputation: 1252
Quote:
Originally Posted by illwauk View Post
...Not only that, but there was a story in the Journal-Sentinel not too long ago about a Black prospective student being harassed by the campus police and was continually asked if he "belonged" there. The fact that the police could automatically assume that Black=not a student should tell you something... a few things actually.
This never happens elsewhere, right? Perhaps we should just abandon the planet, because we'll simply never get it right.

Quote:
And even with the examples you gave, the number of students who never leave the east side is the exception and not the rule (BTW, that Wal-Mart is by no means near the heart of the city... try finding any students who take the bus past there).
Some people complain that suburbanites never get to the city, so here we have thousands of students who live and shop in the city, and still they've messed up. Perhaps, in to order to graduate, students must prove to the Regents that they've explored every city neighborhood. By bus and on foot. [/quote]

Quote:
UWM has a reputation as a suitcase school for a reason... the typical UWM student lives in "Milwaukee" (the upper east side is nothing but a suburb IMO) during the week and goes home for the weekend spending as little time in the city as possible.
This hasn't been true for several years now.

Quote:
UWM also has one of the lowest graduation rates for incoming freshmen because most of them end up realizing that they can't handle city life and transfer to schools up north. They even tried to change the school's name to "Wisconsin State" last spring because a bunch of students (all from out of town, BTW) thought that having "Milwaukee" in the name made it sound too threatening.
They wanted the name change because UW-Milwaukee makes it sounds like the school is a branch campus of UW-Madison. The name "Wisconsin State" would, for its supporters, provide the campus with a more state-wide and unique identity.

Quote:
As far as Chanecllor Santiago's "strategy," it's nothing more than an attempt to ***** UWM's resources out to corporate interests while enhancing his own reputation and further ignoring why the Wisconsin taxpayers fund a place like UWM...to serve the higher education needs of the state's urban areas.
Santiago is actually trying to do something to enhance UWM's reputation and jumpstart the city's economy before it's too late. True, he could channel all of that money into classrooms and lower tuition, but in the meantime job opportunities and future funding for the university would evaporate. Great--here's your diploma; now go to India and look for a job. Santiago knows what the word "investment" means.
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee, WI
80 posts, read 299,252 times
Reputation: 48
Yea the EastSide of Milwaukee near UWM is one great urban neighborhood. Plenty of nighlife, on the lake, has plenty of parks and is generally very safe.
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Old 10-03-2007, 11:42 PM
 
Location: AZ
5,077 posts, read 6,248,707 times
Reputation: 6634
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel_T View Post
Hi, I am considering some colleges in Milwaukee and am interested in coming. I have heard nice things and bad things about the city. More bad than good. pay is no good. Crime is bad. The city is in ruins. What is the scoop on Milwaukee? Is it really crime ridden, dirty, and poor? Thanks.

Daniel True
First, remember that it isn't Tucson, and the sun doesn't shine every day (I live in Scottsdale AND Milwaukee, so I'm pretty familiar with both areas). That often gives the city a drab appearance. Also, it is older. Again, Arizona was hardly anything when Milwaukee was a large city for its time. This is something that people from the Western US have problems understanding. When they travel east, everything is "old". But when easterners travel west, they laugh because everything was built recently. Or at least, in comparison, it was built recently.

UWM is a nice school, the surrounding area is VERY nice, and I lived for quite some time on Newberry Blvd, which is a historic street with $500k++ homes, right in the heart of the UWM neighborhood. That is typical of the neighborhood. Very nice, upscale, good area.

Yes, the UWM neighborhood doesn't want the crime from the ghettos of Milwaukee infiltrating it's area. Who would? Drunken students are bad enough... but the city itself, and the suburbs, have VERY nice, very urbane, safe neighborhoods.

The same as Tucson, and especially Phoenix. Phoenix is totally safe, upscale, and beautiful. Well, make that North Scottsdale. If you go south of downtown, it isn't exactly beautiful, safe, or upscale.

Take a trip up there and see what you see. Stick to the east side or the North Shore and you will find suburbs and a city that rival others. But go to the north side of the city, maybe 35th and Capitol Drive or that area, and find crime that ALSO rivals other cities.

I don't know how else to explain it. The city is not bad, but it has many bad parts. Not in ruins. And the downtown area (and surrounding) are becoming the place to be. Many rentals and condos, very nice surroundings, lots of history and old style buildings.

But different than Arizona.
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Old 10-04-2007, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Metro Milwaukee, WI
3,058 posts, read 8,154,652 times
Reputation: 1615
Quote:
Originally Posted by 43north87west View Post
First, remember that it isn't Tucson, and the sun doesn't shine every day (I live in Scottsdale AND Milwaukee, so I'm pretty familiar with both areas). That often gives the city a drab appearance. Also, it is older. Again, Arizona was hardly anything when Milwaukee was a large city for its time. This is something that people from the Western US have problems understanding. When they travel east, everything is "old". But when easterners travel west, they laugh because everything was built recently. Or at least, in comparison, it was built recently.

UWM is a nice school, the surrounding area is VERY nice, and I lived for quite some time on Newberry Blvd, which is a historic street with $500k++ homes, right in the heart of the UWM neighborhood. That is typical of the neighborhood. Very nice, upscale, good area.

Yes, the UWM neighborhood doesn't want the crime from the ghettos of Milwaukee infiltrating it's area. Who would? Drunken students are bad enough... but the city itself, and the suburbs, have VERY nice, very urbane, safe neighborhoods.

The same as Tucson, and especially Phoenix. Phoenix is totally safe, upscale, and beautiful. Well, make that North Scottsdale. If you go south of downtown, it isn't exactly beautiful, safe, or upscale.

Take a trip up there and see what you see. Stick to the east side or the North Shore and you will find suburbs and a city that rival others. But go to the north side of the city, maybe 35th and Capitol Drive or that area, and find crime that ALSO rivals other cities.

I don't know how else to explain it. The city is not bad, but it has many bad parts. Not in ruins. And the downtown area (and surrounding) are becoming the place to be. Many rentals and condos, very nice surroundings, lots of history and old style buildings.

But different than Arizona.
Hey 43north87west -

Somewhat off topic, but just off of curiosity, do you prefer Milwaukee or Scottsdale more? And why. What is good about each / bad about each.

I would just be curious to hear your thoughts, as I just moved back here from Albuquerque, NM which obviously has quite a bit of differences to the Phoenix metro area, but also quite a bit of similarities too, and I am starting to develop my own opinions of what I prefer about up here and what I preferred strongly down there.

Just be curious to hear your thoughts.
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Old 10-04-2007, 11:48 PM
 
Location: AZ
5,077 posts, read 6,248,707 times
Reputation: 6634
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnjoyEP View Post
Hey 43north87west -

Somewhat off topic, but just off of curiosity, do you prefer Milwaukee or Scottsdale more? And why. What is good about each / bad about each.

I would just be curious to hear your thoughts, as I just moved back here from Albuquerque, NM which obviously has quite a bit of differences to the Phoenix metro area, but also quite a bit of similarities too, and I am starting to develop my own opinions of what I prefer about up here and what I preferred strongly down there.

Just be curious to hear your thoughts.
That's interesting. I have thought about this all day--what *do* I like best about each.

I thought up my short list of things that I would give each city:

Milwaukee
-----------
-Lake Michigan (I am a lifelong sailor and powerboater)
-Established history and old world roots
-Old buildings, classic architecture
-Trees
-Entertainment, nightlife, city festivals, Bastille days, etc.
-Easy to get around, area is fairly condensed
-Airport is nice, clean, easy in and out, and parking always available
-Train service to Chicago
-Close proximity to Chicago
-Recreational opportunities in all seasons
-Great strip of living, eating, and drinking from the upper east side through the 3rd and 2nd wards, to Bay View
-Nice yacht harbor(s) and many inland lakes
-Great mountain biking nearby, great on road riding in some areas

Scottsdale
-----------
-Weather is almost perfect (for me hot is fine)
-Golf anywhere every day
-Everything is new, so homes have amenities one would associate with new construction
-Interesting and unique desert scenery
-Low taxes
-Having a nice car is easier because it doesn't get ruined by salt, potholes, and humidity
-Friendly people (only my opinion)
-Low crime in Scottsdale (aside from petty crimes)
-Beautiful mountain scenery
-Easily change climate within a two hour drive
-Experiencing a boom and therefore affluence is plentiful
-Good job market, decent business climate

Now, having quickly stated what I consider to be winning attributes of each, there are a few things that I'd like to comment on. Each city has great areas, and each city has dumpy areas. I've lived around the US quite a bit, all east of the Mississippi until Arizona. I know that Milwaukee takes hits for violence and run down areas. I agree that there are problems, but there are many (read: "most") areas in the Phoenix area, that are not exactly nice either. The problems that Milwaukee has, are not experienced in the Southwest, of course. There are different, yet equally significant problems in this area, as there are in Milwaukee. Immigration, specifically the illegal kind, is a critical issue here. Crime is also a huge problem here--just not where I live. There are other very nice areas as well, but there are also miles and miles of "bad" areas. Just like Milwaukee, just like every other city.

The sunbelt has its problems as well. The growth drives locals crazy. The freeways are crowded, the growth causes pains, and the people react poorly to the above. There is PLENTY of crime, but like most of the sunbelt, crime is kept away from the areas where either wealthy people live, or wealthy tourists visit.

Also, I have to mention the "pop culture" factor. This area is absolutely enamored with pop culture, huge SUVs with big wheels, and so on. I--as somewhat of an Iconoclast, have a problem dealing with the pop culture set. (I call them the "huge sunglasses" crowd, which I saw on this very website and started using because it described people perfectly.)

Milwaukee is not a "pop culture" city, most areas in the Midwest are too unique for that. Milwaukee has many unique attributes. It can never outrun the periodically gray weather, or things having to do with its age. Likewise, Arizona (Phoenix, specifically) can not outrun 115 degrees in summer, the water problem, and the lack of motivation that people experience during the hot months. Milwaukee has many great things going for it. There are crime problems and some racial tensions (we have that in the southwest, at least racial tensions!).

At the end of the day, the weather here is perfect. But I am not unhappy in Milwaukee. Not unhappy at all, in fact. I stay there months out of the year. I have had a hard time deciding which to call "home". Although, there is just something about having nice weather almost guaranteed every day of the year. Still, waking up and knowing that you will not need a jacket by noon on just about every day of the year, is very hard to give up. As time goes on, I wonder if I will return to Milwaukee permanently, or if I will always, from this point forward, be a "part-time" resident.

Of course, I will ALWAYS be a "part time" resident as long as I can afford to move back and forth. I know the city, I know the area, I love the lake, I love the summer, and I travel around the upper Midwest a lot. I have toyed with purchasing a home in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan for summer use. But then I consider the winter. Winter in the midwest is long, but it is not the end of the world. Comparatively, it is terrible though. And I have been loving winter.

If this post sounds wishy-washy, it may very well be entitled to that distinction. There are many pros to this area, and many cons. Likewise for Milwaukee. As far as my future here, should my personal life dry up, I may seriously consider permanently moving north again, either to Milwaukee or Chicago (having lived in both). I'm not sure I would stay here without any personal ties to the area. At least not permanently.
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Old 10-05-2007, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Metro Milwaukee, WI
3,058 posts, read 8,154,652 times
Reputation: 1615
Quote:
Originally Posted by 43north87west View Post
That's interesting. I have thought about this all day--what *do* I like best about each.

I thought up my short list of things that I would give each city:

Milwaukee
-----------
-Lake Michigan (I am a lifelong sailor and powerboater)
-Established history and old world roots
-Old buildings, classic architecture
-Trees
-Entertainment, nightlife, city festivals, Bastille days, etc.
-Easy to get around, area is fairly condensed
-Airport is nice, clean, easy in and out, and parking always available
-Train service to Chicago
-Close proximity to Chicago
-Recreational opportunities in all seasons
-Great strip of living, eating, and drinking from the upper east side through the 3rd and 2nd wards, to Bay View
-Nice yacht harbor(s) and many inland lakes
-Great mountain biking nearby, great on road riding in some areas

Scottsdale
-----------
-Weather is almost perfect (for me hot is fine)
-Golf anywhere every day
-Everything is new, so homes have amenities one would associate with new construction
-Interesting and unique desert scenery
-Low taxes
-Having a nice car is easier because it doesn't get ruined by salt, potholes, and humidity
-Friendly people (only my opinion)
-Low crime in Scottsdale (aside from petty crimes)
-Beautiful mountain scenery
-Easily change climate within a two hour drive
-Experiencing a boom and therefore affluence is plentiful
-Good job market, decent business climate

Now, having quickly stated what I consider to be winning attributes of each, there are a few things that I'd like to comment on. Each city has great areas, and each city has dumpy areas. I've lived around the US quite a bit, all east of the Mississippi until Arizona. I know that Milwaukee takes hits for violence and run down areas. I agree that there are problems, but there are many (read: "most") areas in the Phoenix area, that are not exactly nice either. The problems that Milwaukee has, are not experienced in the Southwest, of course. There are different, yet equally significant problems in this area, as there are in Milwaukee. Immigration, specifically the illegal kind, is a critical issue here. Crime is also a huge problem here--just not where I live. There are other very nice areas as well, but there are also miles and miles of "bad" areas. Just like Milwaukee, just like every other city.

The sunbelt has its problems as well. The growth drives locals crazy. The freeways are crowded, the growth causes pains, and the people react poorly to the above. There is PLENTY of crime, but like most of the sunbelt, crime is kept away from the areas where either wealthy people live, or wealthy tourists visit.

Also, I have to mention the "pop culture" factor. This area is absolutely enamored with pop culture, huge SUVs with big wheels, and so on. I--as somewhat of an Iconoclast, have a problem dealing with the pop culture set. (I call them the "huge sunglasses" crowd, which I saw on this very website and started using because it described people perfectly.)

Milwaukee is not a "pop culture" city, most areas in the Midwest are too unique for that. Milwaukee has many unique attributes. It can never outrun the periodically gray weather, or things having to do with its age. Likewise, Arizona (Phoenix, specifically) can not outrun 115 degrees in summer, the water problem, and the lack of motivation that people experience during the hot months. Milwaukee has many great things going for it. There are crime problems and some racial tensions (we have that in the southwest, at least racial tensions!).

At the end of the day, the weather here is perfect. But I am not unhappy in Milwaukee. Not unhappy at all, in fact. I stay there months out of the year. I have had a hard time deciding which to call "home". Although, there is just something about having nice weather almost guaranteed every day of the year. Still, waking up and knowing that you will not need a jacket by noon on just about every day of the year, is very hard to give up. As time goes on, I wonder if I will return to Milwaukee permanently, or if I will always, from this point forward, be a "part-time" resident.

Of course, I will ALWAYS be a "part time" resident as long as I can afford to move back and forth. I know the city, I know the area, I love the lake, I love the summer, and I travel around the upper Midwest a lot. I have toyed with purchasing a home in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan for summer use. But then I consider the winter. Winter in the midwest is long, but it is not the end of the world. Comparatively, it is terrible though. And I have been loving winter.

If this post sounds wishy-washy, it may very well be entitled to that distinction. There are many pros to this area, and many cons. Likewise for Milwaukee. As far as my future here, should my personal life dry up, I may seriously consider permanently moving north again, either to Milwaukee or Chicago (having lived in both). I'm not sure I would stay here without any personal ties to the area. At least not permanently.
Very interesting stuff, NW, thanks for sharing. Very interesting perspectives, I agree with much that you say.

I know I really got to love Albuquerque's climate as well for the same reasons you love Scottsdales - you can be outside so often. I am a runner, and it was nice never having to even consider it might rain to ruin a run at a particular time, or to walk with my little kids. I know having relo'd back here, I am already missing the weather (and actually, Milwaukee's fall thus far has been freakishly nice with 70s, 80s, sunny skies and low humidities the norm, however, I do see the 50s lurking towards mid-week next week).

But beyond weather, Milwaukee and these unique, older cities up here just seem to offer things that the SW doesn't (and vice/versa). Just interesting stuff. Thanks for sharing.
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