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Old 11-02-2007, 12:31 PM
 
1,703 posts, read 3,708,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adam76 View Post
Excellent post. Even now as a suburbanite we still come to the south side regularly, we love shopping at El Rey! The difference in the vitality between the north and south side is certainly striking.
El Rey is tasty treats.
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Old 11-06-2007, 09:32 AM
 
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i dont think you can compare some small vacant lot areas to the south side because the north side of milwaukee is so much bigger than the south side areas when you dont include suburbs, only city limits and even when you include all suburbs to measure

besides there have always been latinization of milwaukee,(french people,italians) those are the real latins
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Old 11-06-2007, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Rochester, MN
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I agree with the person who mentioned the "fanning out" comment. Even traditionally "white" communities such as Green Bay have seen a tremendous influx in recent years. Green Bay's k-12 student population is now 34% non-white.

For the individual that mentioned that the growth of this population was "negative", I suggest he or she actually visits these communities. From my experience, Latinos have reinvigorated the Southside of Milwaukee. Community specific businesses encourage entreprenuership and create cultural as well as economic capital. Family owned businesses create a much greater sense of community than the big-box development plans have in the former Capital Court and Northridge areas. Not to mention that this newly generated wealth stays in the community rather going to corporate headquarters in another state. As Latinos continue to move into the community, they continue to enrich the famous "diversity" that Milwaukee prides itself upon. This positive growth could do wonders for a depopulating Northwest Milwaukee...

The same is true of Minneapolis. The Lake Street cooridor was widely regarded as one of the most dangerous ares of the entire city. As little as 10 years ago, there were many vacant buildings along this stretch. As the Latino population came in, positive changes occurred. Now, you would be hard pressed to find anyone who doesn't want to go into this community and see what it has to offer.

Bottom line: diversity good, small minded ethno-centric attitudes bad.
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Old 11-07-2007, 08:15 AM
 
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I totally agree, thequon. Latinos, Asians and Africans are the latest great American immigrant story. Just as one hundred years ago the Germans, Poles, Italians, Irish and Czechs (among others) flooded into our city, making it what it is today, the Mexicans, Hmong, and African immigrants are coming to Milwaukee and injecting new life into our city. I'm all for it.

In the newspaper this morning, we all read about how the United States Census has revised Milwaukee's population estimate. Now, rather than losing population, the Census says we are gaining population. This is good news for Milwaukee, and I think it has everything to do with new Latin and Asian immigration coming into the city, as well as the continued wave in Downtown residential development.
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Old 06-28-2012, 02:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Empidonax View Post
I agree that there is a certain degree of "Latinization" in parts of Milwaukee and in some of the southerly, inner-ring suburbs. The general population of the city, like the general population of the county, is declining, but the Hispanic population in the city and county is growing. From what I understand, over 80,000 people of Hispanic descent live in the city, and most are concentrated (as you say) in the near southwest side.

The inner-ring suburbs of West Milwaukee and West Allis have seen increases in Hispanic residents, even as the overall population of these two communities has declined. From what I can tell, most of these Hispanics are Mexican or are of Mexican descent, and are trying to move socioeconomically. West Allis in particular has a small but growing percentage of middle-class Latinos.

There is a smaller but concentrated population of Hispanics, especially Puerto Ricans, on the East Side, in the Riverwest area (along Holton). This population isn't growing as fast as the southside populations, but it is strong, and has been there since at least the 1950s.

One of the interesting things about the southside Latino population is that it is becoming very diverse. In the past two decades, and especially in the past 7-10 years, many Central Americans, Colombians, Dominicans, and Peruvians have made the southside their home. Some businesses have begun to reflect this. Also interesting is that, as the this Latino population has grown and expanded, more Asians--especially Hmong, Laotians, and Thai--have settled in the neighborhood as well.
Hi! New member here and seeing as how I have lived on the South Side of Milwaukee my whole life, I have to agree and disagree with some of the things that you said here.

I agree that the Hispanic population in the city and even somewhat in the county is growing. I realize that you posted this in 2007, so I will give updated figures from the 2010 Census. According to the Census Bureau, there were 103,007 people who idendified as "Hispanic or Latino" in 2010 in the city of Milwaukee, a substantial increase since 2000. I see a few more Latinos in West Allis, but the African-American non-Latino population is increasing far faster in West Allis and I drive through there fairly often.

Secondly, yes there has been a stateside Puerto Rican population in Riverwest since about the 1950s, which I believe numbered around 1,500 in the 2000 Census. Unfortunately, although the 2010 American Factfinder does give % "Hispanic or Latino" for specific zip codes, it does not specify which Latino groups in each zip code like the 2000 American Factfinder did. However, I do know for a fact both from experience and from the 2000 Census stats that the vast majority of stateside Puerto Ricans in Milwaukee live on the South Side. One of the health clinics that I used to go to on the Near South Side had several buildings nearby with Puerto Rican flags in them, including at least two taverns. I have also both met and have had many friends of Puerto Rican ancestry on the South Side, and Mexican-American as well. It is not uncommon to see Puerto Rican flags hanging from rear-view mirrors on the South Side, especially Near-Mid South Side. And there are many Puerto Rican families that come to Jackson Park on the 4th of July from the afternoon to nighttime when they have the fireworks, as well as many Mexican-American families and a few African-American non-Latino families.

The Central-American,South-American, Cuban and Dominican populations in Milwaukee are still very,very small and I can't remember ever meeting anybody on the South Side that has told me that they are of any of those backgrounds, except for two of my friends growing up whose mother was of Mexican ancestry and father was of Chilean ancestry.

According to the 2010 Census, Milwaukee's "Hispanic or Latino" population in 2010 was:

"69,680 Mexican"
"24,672 Puerto Rican"
"1,962 Central American"
"1,299 South American"
"866 Cuban"
"720 Dominican (Dominican Republic)"

I would take a hazard and guess that the population of Mexican descent is a bit larger than that, and possibly also somewhat the stateside Puerto Rican population. It is interesting to note that between 2000 and 2010, the city of Milwaukee gained slightly more than 5,000 in it's Puerto Rican population, while both Chicago and New York City lost Puerto Ricans - if I recall correctly, about 10,000 for Chicago and in the tens-of-thousands (possibly more) in New York City. Please correct me if I am wrong for those two (The 2000 American Factfinder is no longer available), but I know for sure that they both lost Puerto Ricans and many have moved to Florida. I'm not sure why Milwaukee gained by 5,000 in P.R. population while the two biggies lost.

Lastly, I have to disagree with those who are saying that Milwaukee's Latino population is largely concentrated on the Southwest Side. The vast majority of Milwaukee's Latinos still live on the Near and Mid-South Side in the zip codes 53204 and 53215, not the Southwest Side, although there has been a slight increase in Latinos in the 53219 zip code. There are still very few Latinos in Milwaukee's suburbs.
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Old 06-28-2012, 02:47 PM
 
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"Chicago has been receiving Latino immigrants since at least the early 70s"

Yes, but actually Latinos started coming in large numbers in Chicago decades before that. In Milwaukee, the first people of Mexican descent started coming in decent numbers as early as the 1920s. They were recruited to work in factories where the largely Polish-American workers were on-strike. I have both read and heard that the Mexicans recruited were not aware of this. Milwaukee's Puerto Ricans started coming in decent numbers as early as the 1950s.
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Old 06-28-2012, 04:00 PM
 
29 posts, read 34,278 times
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"They move into virtually all white areas, rural areas, the north, south, east, west, mountains etc."

I really have to disagree. Sure, there are a few exceptions, but often times when Latinos move in, White non-Latinos move out.

An example would be here in Milwaukee. The South Side in the old days was mainly Polish-American with some German-Americans as well. Then it gradually became mainly Latino (both Mexican-American and Puerto Rican). And now it is mainly Mexican-American, Puerto Rican and (a very quickly-growing) African-American non-Latino population. If you drive through the Near and Mid-South Side, you will see very few White non-Latino-looking people. If you drive down the whole length of National Ave. on the Near South Side, almost everybody you see will be African-American, with a few Latinos here and there. Sure, a few might be Black-Puerto Rican, but in that concentration and considering Milwaukee's large African-American non-Latino population, likely not the vast majority.

Latinos are often concentrated in urban areas and often live either near and/or in areas with many African-American non-Latinos. Some examples are: South-Central Los Angeles (large African-American and Mexican-American area in Compton, Inglewood and other parts), the South Side of Chicago (very large African-American and Mexican-American area), Houston (has large African-American and Mexican-American populations), Dallas (same, but not as large as Houston's), the Atlanta metro area (large African-American and Mexican-American areas), here in Milwaukee as I already mentioned on the Near-Mid South Side, parts of Racine,WI and Kenosha, WI, and areas of Northern Illinois past Chicago. I'm sure there are others that I have missed.

There are areas that are mainly White non-Latino and Mexican-American in Los Angeles (Whittier, Riverside, West Covina) and Orange County, CA and probably in San Diego as well given its population demographics and I'm sure in Phoenix as well for the same reason. But as far as urban areas go, the former seems to outweigh the latter, including in various areas in the South that have been experiencing fast-growing Latino (mainly Mexican) populations.

As far as the other Latino groups, there are many areas in New York City and other parts of the East Coast that are mainly Puerto Rican and African-American non-Latino and many areas that are mainly Dominican-American and African-American non-Latino. East Harlem in NYC has long been a mainly Puerto Rican and African-American non-Latino area, but there has been a fast-growing Mexican population there as well as many Dominican-Americans.

There are very small towns throughout the country that have been majority White non-Latino for their entire history and have just recently experienced marked increases of people of Mexican ancestry moving in, such as Postville, IA, Driggs, ID and Delavan, WI, but these are very small populations.
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Old 06-28-2012, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Bay View, Milwaukee
1,252 posts, read 2,404,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Il Vino View Post
Hi! New member here and seeing as how I have lived on the South Side of Milwaukee my whole life, I have to agree and disagree with some of the things that you said here.

I agree that the Hispanic population in the city and even somewhat in the county is growing. I realize that you posted this in 2007, so I will give updated figures from the 2010 Census. According to the Census Bureau, there were 103,007 people who idendified as "Hispanic or Latino" in 2010 in the city of Milwaukee, a substantial increase since 2000. I see a few more Latinos in West Allis, but the African-American non-Latino population is increasing far faster in West Allis and I drive through there fairly often.

Secondly, yes there has been a stateside Puerto Rican population in Riverwest since about the 1950s, which I believe numbered around 1,500 in the 2000 Census. Unfortunately, although the 2010 American Factfinder does give % "Hispanic or Latino" for specific zip codes, it does not specify which Latino groups in each zip code like the 2000 American Factfinder did. However, I do know for a fact both from experience and from the 2000 Census stats that the vast majority of stateside Puerto Ricans in Milwaukee live on the South Side. One of the health clinics that I used to go to on the Near South Side had several buildings nearby with Puerto Rican flags in them, including at least two taverns. I have also both met and have had many friends of Puerto Rican ancestry on the South Side, and Mexican-American as well. It is not uncommon to see Puerto Rican flags hanging from rear-view mirrors on the South Side, especially Near-Mid South Side. And there are many Puerto Rican families that come to Jackson Park on the 4th of July from the afternoon to nighttime when they have the fireworks, as well as many Mexican-American families and a few African-American non-Latino families.

The Central-American,South-American, Cuban and Dominican populations in Milwaukee are still very,very small and I can't remember ever meeting anybody on the South Side that has told me that they are of any of those backgrounds, except for two of my friends growing up whose mother was of Mexican ancestry and father was of Chilean ancestry.

According to the 2010 Census, Milwaukee's "Hispanic or Latino" population in 2010 was:

"69,680 Mexican"
"24,672 Puerto Rican"
"1,962 Central American"
"1,299 South American"
"866 Cuban"
"720 Dominican (Dominican Republic)"

I would take a hazard and guess that the population of Mexican descent is a bit larger than that, and possibly also somewhat the stateside Puerto Rican population. It is interesting to note that between 2000 and 2010, the city of Milwaukee gained slightly more than 5,000 in it's Puerto Rican population, while both Chicago and New York City lost Puerto Ricans - if I recall correctly, about 10,000 for Chicago and in the tens-of-thousands (possibly more) in New York City. Please correct me if I am wrong for those two (The 2000 American Factfinder is no longer available), but I know for sure that they both lost Puerto Ricans and many have moved to Florida. I'm not sure why Milwaukee gained by 5,000 in P.R. population while the two biggies lost.

Lastly, I have to disagree with those who are saying that Milwaukee's Latino population is largely concentrated on the Southwest Side. The vast majority of Milwaukee's Latinos still live on the Near and Mid-South Side in the zip codes 53204 and 53215, not the Southwest Side, although there has been a slight increase in Latinos in the 53219 zip code. There are still very few Latinos in Milwaukee's suburbs.
Excellent post. I haven't checked stats lately, but this all sounds on target to me. The numbers on Central and South Americans seem credible to me--my perceptions on these groups have been based on my job (I get a lot of Hispanic/Latino students at the college where I teach, and I've had quite a few southside Central/South Americans passing through among them) and on my visits to the southside (I tend to look for Central and South American businesses, and that probably led me to pump up their prominence).
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:00 PM
 
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Default People who identified as "Hispanic" in Chicago

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drover View Post
Don't be so sure. We've already got nearly half a million here in Chicago -- and that's not counting the suburbs. And they're still coming. That is to say, there's a large, steady supply just south of you, and they've already begun fanning out. I give it until the 2030 Census for Hispanics to not only outnumber blacks in Milwaukee, but to outnumber whites as well.
Actually, the city of Chicago had quite a bit more than half-a-million Hispanics in 2000 according to the census data that I remember for that year. In fact, several-hundred-thousand more. You may have been thinking of the Mexican-American population alone in the city of Chicago, which numbered in the 500,000 - 550,000 range to my recollection. Here is an update:

As of the 2010 Census, these are the stats for the city of Chicago:

"Mexican - 578,100" (An increase since the 2000 Census)
"Puerto Rican - 102,703" (A loss of about 10,000 since the 2000 Census)
"Cuban - 8,331"
"Dominican (Dominican Republic) - 2,737"
"Central American - 31,263"
"South American - 32,129"
"Other Hispanic or Latino - 23,599"

Total identified as "Hispanic or Latino": 778,862


As of the 2010 Census, these are the stats for Cook County,IL:

"Mexican - 961,963" (An increase since the 2000 Census)
"Puerto Rican - 133,882" (Don't remember the number in 2000, but I believe it is a decrease. Somebody please correct me if I am wrong.)
"Cuban - 13,679"
"Dominican (Dominican Republic) - 3,893"
"Central American - 45,028"
"South American - 47,583"
"Other Hispanic or Latino - 38,734"

Total identified as "Hispanic or Latino": 1,244,762

Source: U.S. Census Bureau - American FactFinder
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:31 PM
 
29 posts, read 34,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuclear_Art View Post
That I don't necessarily agree on. There are a lot of other factors involved in the US, Midwest and Milwaukee to even say whether there will be a linear growth increase.

Another dimension to understand is that this isn't necessarily an increase based on immigration. The census figures also give data on those that are foreign born. Those figures show less of an increase than the hispanic populations. Many people like to make the assumption that Hispanics=Mexican Immigrants which is totally untrue.
Well, here is an update:

Between the 2000 Census and 2010 Census:

Those in the city of Milwaukee who identified as "White" decreased by about 32,000.

Those in the city of Milwaukee who identified as "Black or African American" increased by about 15,000.

Those in the city of Milwaukee who identified as "Asian" increased by about 3,000. (Although I really think that the number is much higher considering the noticeable increase of Arab-Americans as well as Pakistani and Indian-Americans originating from the Asian continent. The Hmong-American population certainly increased considerably as well.)

Those in the city of Milwaukee who identified as "Hispanic or Latino" increased by 31,400. That is, from 71,646 in 2000 to 103,007 in 2010. I'd say that is a considerable increase and is in fact, more than any of the other aforementioned generalized ethnic designations. The exact number is likely also a bit higher than that.

However, I have both been reading and hearing lately that the wave of immigration of Latinos, specifically from Mexico, has slowed down quite a bit in recent years and that immigrants from Asia are starting to outnumber immigrants from Latin America. How true that is, I do not know. It is hard to tell this soon. But, it seems as though the Latino population in Milwaukee has still been increasing considerably.

Sources: I still have the 2000 Census data for Milwaukee printed out from years ago.
Also, U.S Census Bureau 2010 Census - American FactFinder - Results

Last edited by Il Vino; 06-28-2012 at 06:39 PM..
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