U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Minnesota
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 11-10-2012, 11:18 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
5,147 posts, read 6,714,002 times
Reputation: 1565

Advertisements

Germans are the biggest minority. Believe that is one of their influences. Gehen sie mit?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-10-2012, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,018 posts, read 11,299,763 times
Reputation: 8959
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beenhere4ever View Post
"Are you going with?" Never heard that in Washington or Oregon.
That's the Germanic influence. You hear that here in Ontario but always from someone that has Germanic roots.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Homer Alaska
1,055 posts, read 1,616,543 times
Reputation: 849
Along the border country where I was raised-he went to [BtheB] hospital. Across the river in Canada-he went to hospital.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
5,808 posts, read 6,420,175 times
Reputation: 8705
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
There is a difference,
You don't have to believe me but there is.

As for the carbohydrate component, casserole dishes usually use a grain like rice or noodles.

A hot dish, on the other hand, is a variation of the casserole dish particularly popular in North and South Dakota and Minnesota. Like its counterpart, it is a complete and packed meal in itself. It has starch, proteins, soup, and crust components as well. However, hot dishes mostly use potato bases like potato chips, hash browns, strings and tater tots. They never use rice for the base.
Read more: Difference Between Casserole and Hot Dish | Difference Between | Casserole vs Hot Dish Difference Between Casserole and Hot Dish | Difference Between | Casserole vs Hot Dish

know the difference, I'd be embarrassed to call myself a Minnesotan and not know the difference.

If you like to mix the two together more power to you, but they are not the same thing.
Despite what this website says, the terms are regional and are used to describe the same sort of meal. Their "rules" about noodles are disproven by the famed tuna-noodle hot dish, and they seem unaware that potato chips and fried onions are used as a topping and not a binder. In any event, dishes that we called a casserole in the place where I used to live are made in the exact same way here, but are called hot dishes.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
5,808 posts, read 6,420,175 times
Reputation: 8705
Quote:
Originally Posted by freezengirl View Post
Along the border country where I was raised-he went to [BtheB] hospital. Across the river in Canada-he went to hospital.
Same as university, eh?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 13,930,218 times
Reputation: 3593
Glenfield,
Confusion sets in when some don't know that there is a difference between the two and some think hot-dish and casserole are interchangeable, meaning they are the same thing and they are not.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities
5,808 posts, read 6,420,175 times
Reputation: 8705
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
Glenfield,
Confusion sets in when some don't know that there is a difference between the two and some think hot-dish and casserole are interchangeable, meaning they are the same thing and they are not.
Well, chaos and confusion may reign, but people here in Minnesota say hot dish, and where I come from originally, they never, ever say hot dish but always say casserole for meals made of the exact same ingredients and cooked exactly the same way. In fact, I never heard of the term hot dish until I moved here.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
10,018 posts, read 11,299,763 times
Reputation: 8959
Never have I ever heard the term, Hot dish in Canada except an older term describing an attractive young lady!!! LOL

What do you call soft drinks there? Soda or pop.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 08:30 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 24,482,902 times
Reputation: 6734
I would guess that if you asked ten Minnesotans if casserole and hot dish meant the same thing, 9 out of 10 (if not 10 out of 10) would say yes. Perhaps there is some technical difference, but common usage in this state -- at least where I've lived -- is that hot dish and casserole can be used interchangeably. If someone is overly worried about confusion, they can always use the specific name of the dish being served.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2012, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 13,930,218 times
Reputation: 3593
Guess this guess that, I'll just make something up because that is what I believe.

Having grown up in Northern MN in the 60"s and Lutheran I can assure you I have been to a pot luck or two in my time. If your going to ask around ask old Lutheran cooks that are 45 or older.


Difference between Casserole and Hotdish
• As far as the differences between casserole and Hotdish are concerned, casseroles make use of lighter meats than Hotdish and use grains and noodles for carbohydrate content.
• Casseroles are prepared without covering them throughout cooking.
• A Hotdish can truly be called a variation of a casserole, and is more popular in the states of North and South Dakota and Minnesota.
• Potatoes make an important ingredient in Hotdish.
• However, there are other important ingredients such as vegetables, grains and legumes to make it wholesome.
• There is no rice in Hotdish, which is always present in casserole.
• One more thing that makes Hotdish different is the use of mushroom crème as a binding agent.



Hotdish is so integral to Minnesota culture that Sen. Al Franken even welcomed the state's Congressional delegation to participate in a hotdish competition this past January. The winner did not feature another Minnesota product, the lovely wild rice. It didn't feature venison bratwurst, or any other enobling ingredients. Nope — the winner was Sen. Amy Klobuchar, whose Taconite Tater Tot Hot Dish was a combination of ground beef, creamed soups (mushroom and chicken), tater tots and Pepper Jack cheese.

Sen. Klobuchar’s Taconite Tater Tot Hot Dish

Sen. Klobuchar’s Taconite Tater Tot Hot Dish « CBS Minnesota

and some folks say a hot-dish is the same thing as a casserole.
Fins and Norwegians with a heavy accent will find it easier to say hot-dish



Bars
what ya think'en aboot a brewski.
think agean
Bars: The name for any type of dessert that is not in cookie, pie, icecream or cake form that is often brought to potlucks. Many bars involve Special K cereal, Rice Krispies, chocolate and peanut butter.

Again I came across the term Hot-Dish.

Hotdish: (pronounced “hawt deesh”) A baked item, usually served at potlucks, that is similar to a casserole in other parts of the country. Most hotdishes usually contain a starch, a meat and vegetables (canned or frozen) with the most popular being a Tater-tot hotdish. Example: “I’ll bring some Special K Bars to the potluck, why don’t you bring a hotdish?”

Oh: (pronounced “oooooo”) A word used in the majority of conversations in the upper Midwest.

“U” is for Uff-da | Becoming Midwestern “U” is for Uff-da | Follow me as I attempt to become truly Midwestern.

Minnesota is noted for its cold weather and for hardy residents who speak with cute accents. The severe winters don't keep people huddled indoors, though; they continue to go ice fishing, skating, and socializing,
Keep warm ya haters
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Minnesota

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top