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Old 12-12-2013, 04:12 PM
 
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I am from Massachusetts, born raised and educated. I lived in St Paul for 4 months back in 1999, and fell in love with the Minnesota, i am seriously considering moving back. There are some similarities with my state- by an large liberal leaning, good schools and a love for the arts, and very diverse seasons. But I have to say people in Minnesota are MUCH friendlier. In my hometown in MA, neigbors never spoke to one another, but I got the sense Minnesota folks were more outgoing and friendlier than the Massachusetts people I called coworkers and neighbors.

For anyone from Massachusetts or the other New England states who has relocated to Minnesota, what do you think of your new state compared to your native state? What things were gained and lost in moving to this part of the country?
Thanks
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Old 03-02-2014, 09:47 PM
 
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Let me start

Here are the difference between New England or Massachusetts with Minnesota,

1) Black population in metro area is spread out or in twin cities/ than Boston Metro

2) less Irish and less italians and more German and Scandinavians

3) More American Indians Influence in Minnesota

4) Bigger housing and better housing

5) Better transportation

6) Good Quality of life

7) More farmland/ more farmers

8) Few private schools

9) Strong Lutherans and Protestant

10) More opportunities for minorities
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Old 03-03-2014, 09:42 AM
 
1,816 posts, read 2,568,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Romanians View Post
Let me start

Here are the difference between New England or Massachusetts with Minnesota,

1) Black population in metro area is spread out or in twin cities/ than Boston Metro

10) More opportunities for minorities
I question these two points in large part because:

1. The black population is actually pretty concentrated here. A pretty significant chunk of the black population can be found in the North and Phillips neighborhoods in Minneapolis and the historic Rondo corridor in St. Paul.

and

10. I don't know how Boston's black community fares, but Minnesota has one of the largest achievement gaps in the country. Many people of color here are really struggling.
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Old 03-03-2014, 10:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xandrex View Post
I question these two points in large part because:

1. The black population is actually pretty concentrated here. A pretty significant chunk of the black population can be found in the North and Phillips neighborhoods in Minneapolis and the historic Rondo corridor in St. Paul.

and

10. I don't know how Boston's black community fares, but Minnesota has one of the largest achievement gaps in the country. Many people of color here are really struggling.
That is entirely due to the demographics of the black community--it's a very poor community in most of MN. There is not really even a measurable middle class black population in MN, it's an extreme population, very wealthy or very poor and not much in between that....and that statistics are not any different if you factor in economic standards across all groups, whites, blacks, etc. The "gap" has more to do with their bank accounts (or lack there of) than the color of their skin...
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Old 03-03-2014, 01:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
That is entirely due to the demographics of the black community--it's a very poor community in most of MN. There is not really even a measurable middle class black population in MN, it's an extreme population, very wealthy or very poor and not much in between that....and that statistics are not any different if you factor in economic standards across all groups, whites, blacks, etc. The "gap" has more to do with their bank accounts (or lack there of) than the color of their skin...
I had a feeling I'd get push back...

I'm quite aware of what drives this. But that's just it, isn't it? The black community is incredibly impoverished in this area, and we know that it's hard to break the cycle of poverty because of compounding issues. If you're a black child, you're still very likely to be in an impoverished, single-family household. You're likely to live in a poor--and often not terribly safe--neighborhood. You very likely don't have much family time, because your mother is off working sometimes multiple jobs to keep food on the table, shelter over your head, and the lights on. So you have no role models at home or anybody to help you with things like homework. You might have to work or drop out to support the current needs for your family. You aren't going to be able to afford a lot of extra-curricular activities that make you look more enviable for college, and if you do go on to higher ed, you'll almost certainly have to be working full-time or taking out a lot of loans. Being poor doesn't guarantee you a full-ride to a university (and the stats for degrees earned proves that where you start socio-economically often predicts if you'll even have a chance to finish a degree).

And that's the cycle of poverty. You don't need to be a person of color to have these issues. But the color of your skin is a pretty good predictor of where you'll start on the ladder. Once you're at the bottom, it takes a lot of work to escape.

But all of this is really moot. The point I was making is that it's pretty obvious that unless Boston is a complete failure, it's unlikely that it has fewer opportunities for black communities than Minnesota does, which has consistently ranked as one of the top states for educational and employment disparities. I'm not really interested in a debate about race. I was taking a minor quibble with a few points on an otherwise fine list that a poster had put up.
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Old 03-03-2014, 02:58 PM
 
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It's not a debate about race....just pointing out cause and effect...your post made it sound like black families here are oppressed and lacked educational opportunities...just wanted to clarify that

and yes, the cycle is hard to break if you don't try.....
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Old 03-03-2014, 03:04 PM
 
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The seasons are different. Spring/Fall in MN are often shorter. Summers bring jaw-dropping thunder/lightning storms. Winter is similarly long and cold, but different.

Periods of a$$-freezing cold are more typical, but it's often sunny. The reason being that fronts typically move right across southern-mid New England, and in MN you're far to the north. The difference in average snowfall is pretty slim (about 45" Boston to 50" Mpls), but when it falls in Mpls it stays for weeks if not months. In Boston it falls and melts, and you end up with cycles of slush and ice. Thus I generally think driving in Minnesota is actually safer most of the time (though when it really gets below zero there's the danger of exhaust freezing onto the roads and forming black ice) and prettier. At least until even the white snow starts to wear on you.

But, on the plus side, outdoor skating and other activities that rely on a firm ice sheet (ice fishing, snowmobiling) is much more viable!
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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If you're from MA, brace yourself for the weather. It doesn't just get chilly in Minnesota, it gets COLD. For example, the winter of 2013-2014 in Boston would compare would be an abnormally warm winter in Minneapolis.

I'm sorry, but whether the sun is shining or not does not make a difference when the day's high is only -10.

Spring is almost non-existent in the northern portions of the state. Summers will probably be the same in Minneapolis as it is in Boston, if not a little hotter and more humid on some days. Fall is beautiful, but fall in Boston lasts longer than fall in any part of MN.

Minnesota is fiscally liberal in the Cities, Duluth, and Iron Range, and in the center socially. Abortion rates, for example, are lower in MN than MA (although not NH), CT, or RI. Politically, the scene seems similar to neighboring ND and SD (staunch Republican) across the agricultural western part of the state.

I've never been to Boston (although I want to go!), but from what I've seen and heard, the mentality there is totally different. In Boston, there seems to be a big-city rush; in Minnesota, not really. Minnesotans are almost always polite and friendly, as well as extroverted - meaning a stranger might start a random friendly conversation with you in line (and in some environments, this is to be expected).

Minnesota is also more egalitarian than Massachusetts. Minnesota's gini index is 44, but in many regions of the state it is below 40. Massachusetts, at 47.5, is one of the most unequal states in the country.

Minnesota is more isolated than Massachusetts, or pretty much anywhere in New England except the remotest stretches of Maine. For example, you have Portuguese food in Providence, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, ummmm...the Liberty Bell? in Philly, luxury mansions on Cape Cod, actual mountain skiing in New Hampshire, etc. within an easy bus, train, or car ride (I would suppose the latter for the two last ones). In Minnesota, we have a whole lot of lakes, farms, and I guess the beautiful Superior shore (North and South), but not much in the way of urban areas. The closest real urban areas to Minnesota would be Milwaukee and Chicago, which are 5-7 hours from Minneapolis or 6-8 hours from Duluth (assuming sparse traffic congestion delays). Other than that, we're a pretty isolated state.

Last edited by tvdxer; 03-08-2014 at 04:36 PM..
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Old 03-11-2014, 08:17 AM
 
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I grew up in New England and there are definitely some similarities. Orono MN could be a clone of Suffield CT. That said, the winters here are longer but less damp which is an improvement (damp makes cold worse).
There are a lot more metro areas in New England. Here, you have Minneapolis and St. Paul and ...?
You also have the ocean within a decent distance and hills of some consequence in New England.
Here it's quite a bit flatter though you do have plenty of lakes and rivers.
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Old 03-12-2014, 10:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whatever View Post
Here it's quite a bit flatter though you do have plenty of lakes and rivers.
The flatness is one of the harder aspects for me, and if you bike outside the city you'll likely notice the wind persistently. In New England uphills are the grind, but usually followed by a nice downhill run. In MN it feels like I'm always biking into a headwind, no matter which direction I'm going.

For aesthetic purposes, even if you don't live in the Mississippi valley, I think it's helpful to work day trips in that get you a bit of elevation, like the bluffs of Red Wing. Likewise, a weekend trip to south-central WI around the Dells can really help. Call it your 'dream vacation' and cue Martin Zellar (little MN joke there).
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