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Old 10-14-2014, 06:36 PM
 
1,684 posts, read 3,328,937 times
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Winter surfing Lake Superior Duluth MN.

Last edited by demtion35; 10-14-2014 at 06:59 PM..
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:24 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,859 posts, read 3,713,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF1973 View Post
I am a German making an imminent move to the US and have been reading all I can on the subject and of particular interest are the German Americans who made the trek many generations ago. I see they dominate the midwestern region (as well as small areas of Canada). What I want to know is how is how they and you modern day Minnesotans deal with the unbelievable frigid temperatures. Many of your temperatures are the numbers that I have obnly experienced a handful of times in my life, and primarily in the middle of the night (and I am by by no means from a tropical area!). The part that truly boggles the mind is that an entire another country is still to the north! Oh dear! Do you ever feel truly comfortable? How doe one adapt to such conditions? P.S. I greatly admire your fortitude. It lends weight to the "American Spirit" Someday I hope to challenge myself in your climate. Anyways, the main point is I want to know how each of you individually feel about such an extreme climate? Does it ever become normal? Or is it always a struggle?
Last winter was an aberration. Most winters have a handful of subzero days, with temps anywhere from single digits to 30s and even 40s. A few winters ago, my son was unable to go ice fishing nearly as much as he usually does simply because the ice had not frozen to a thick enough level where he felt safe to be on it to fish.

It is mid-October, and I have only worn a light jacket 3 or 4 days so far. The temps are very pleasant and comfortable. In fact, I had my windows open today. When it gets really cold, we have these cool things called furnaces that kick in and keep our buildings warm! I usually keep my house at 62 F, while at work they like 72, which gets too hot for me, so I often crack open a window near my desk. Yes, even in January or February.
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Old 10-14-2014, 10:34 PM
 
3,070 posts, read 4,172,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF1973 View Post
The part that truly boggles the mind is that an entire another country is still to the north! Oh dear!
Canada is colder but if you look at the population density and the weather pattern, a lot of the population has not settled in the extreme cold areas. There is population to the west of us up north but there weather patterns seem to be a bit milder than us. They have wisely not settled in the coldest regions. We seem to have a cold area that routinely dips down from Canada.

But yes, we do get used to it. And when we get fed up with it we vacation on tropical islands, Hawaii is my personal favorite spot.

And willkommen! I have always wondered why my German grandparents didn't keep on going west instead of settling here



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Old 10-15-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: South Minneapolis
4,523 posts, read 5,053,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Thus spake the urbanite.
Don't get touchy on me now, Shakespeare. It was a little joke. It probably wasn't you with the butt crack showing in that t-shirt and tattoos at the Fair.
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Old 10-18-2014, 07:13 PM
 
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How do you deal with it? The same way my German ancestors did and the four generations thereafter. You do. There's really only about 3-4 cold months. Everyone likes to talk it up but I think that's just part of the Scandinavian personality or something.
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Old 10-19-2014, 07:06 PM
 
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my feeling on this is that it's just a little colder than most places surrounding it...for instance, chicago. I lived there and they have cold.
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Old 10-20-2014, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,489 posts, read 1,272,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chubsworth View Post
Cold is the defining feature of Minnesota's climate.
Most of the USA is just as seasonal, but doesn't get as cold.

I would agree that cold is the defining feature of Minnesota's climate. At the very least it's definitely the most widely known and talked about when you travel outside of the Midwest.

When Minnesota makes the national news scene for something, you can bet it's got something to do with cold weather. Just a week or two ago when we had our first snow of the season, my wife and I were watching the ABC national news and they have a picture of a snow covered front yard and it was from the very community we live next to. The verbiage was that it was a cold streak around the upper mid west and that "they even got accumulating snow in XXXX Minnesota"....along with a picture.

Even if we have warmer than normal temperatures in the summer, you'll hear something on the weather channel or national news like "they even got to 96 degrees in Duluth Minnesota, where they aren't used to heat like that", or something similar.

When traveling outside of the Midwest, when you tell people you're from Minnesota, the first question will almost always be something about cold/snow/ice/Winter weather etc... Occasionally someone will
lead with something about all our lakes, but my experience has been that about 95% lead with something related to our cold weather experiences.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:02 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,805 posts, read 16,983,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelF1973 View Post
I am a German making an imminent move to the US and have been reading all I can on the subject and of particular interest are the German Americans who made the trek many generations ago. I see they dominate the midwestern region (as well as small areas of Canada). What I want to know is how is how they and you modern day Minnesotans deal with the unbelievable frigid temperatures. Many of your temperatures are the numbers that I have obnly experienced a handful of times in my life, and primarily in the middle of the night (and I am by by no means from a tropical area!). The part that truly boggles the mind is that an entire another country is still to the north! Oh dear! Do you ever feel truly comfortable? How doe one adapt to such conditions? P.S. I greatly admire your fortitude. It lends weight to the "American Spirit" Someday I hope to challenge myself in your climate. Anyways, the main point is I want to know how each of you individually feel about such an extreme climate? Does it ever become normal? Or is it always a struggle?
I find it amazing how us humans can manage to live in such harsh climates without much people freezing to death.

The infrastructure is pretty great here, we have a couple indoor parks... big buildings with trees and little streams inside.. indoor waterparks, heated parking garages, big shopping malls, skyways. so its not THAT bad.
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Old 10-21-2014, 07:52 AM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
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As someone in the weather forecasting business....one of the hardest part in explaining weather is each person has his/her own idea of what extreme is? Thus extreme cold....for someone new to the area that could be zero (F) for those that have lived here could be -20 or -30F...some people are cold in-tolerant and some are more cold tolerant (like myself). Plus all depends on where you talk about in Minnesota. Say up here in northwestern Minnesota....we consider Twin Cities cold not extreme in most cases as we get a lot colder. But someone from Chicago will look at the TC and see extreme cold.

But your body does acclimate pretty fast to whatever environment you are placed in. Most do anyway, but some never do, whether it's too hot, too cold, too wet or too dry.

Having young kids I would say the biggest issue up here in far northwestern MN is just kids get a bit stir crazy if we have a long stretch of wind chills below -30F, in which case outdoor activities for the very young are curtailed. You button them up for school and un-clothe them after school. Having a 3 car heated garage is very very useful as it is used a lot in the winter for playing....we have a basketball hoop....and they play floor hockey. Granted it can be a pain to keep clean so I vacuum the sand that gets in from the car tires quite often. In my region wind and blowing snow is a huge issue, so often the depth of snow in the backyard can be quite variable and deep in spots and thus you often have to dig a path so you can go outback. Not all years, but many.
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Old 10-21-2014, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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I live in northern Minnesota. Yes, winter is cold here, and yes, it's long. Very cold and long. This last winter particularly.

Long winters tend also to cut into the quality of our summers. At the end of the spring and beginning of the summer, there is a pronounced mosquito season anywhere rural - such as where you would find hiking trails, one of the chief attractions of living here. Usually it's mid or late July when the mosquitoes die down, but they didn't really cease to exist here this year until late September!

Being indoors on winter days, especially those that are bitterly cold, is not too pleasant, even if you have your house heated to 75 degrees. The reason is the absolute humidity level remains the same while the indoor temperature goes up, creating indoor relative humidities similar to those experienced in deserts. You can, of course, humidify rooms in your house, but most public spaces aren't humidified, leading to all kinds of minor discomforts.

Also, often overlooked is the misery caused by the lengths of our cold spells. It isn't like the Black Hills or Badlands of South Dakota where they get reasonable, if not short, breaks from the cold. It's constantly cold in the winter here, with the "breaks" being the odd day where it reaches a few degrees above freezing.
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