U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Mississippi
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-15-2007, 08:42 PM
 
5 posts, read 15,491 times
Reputation: 18

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jetjockey75 View Post
Very eloquent post, Mississippi Girl .... I think you will have a successful life
Thanks I have done everything in my power to ensure that it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by proud to be American View Post
Well said! and congratulations with your degree. If i may ask where do you live now?

I reside in Starkville, MS now but I am most likely going to be relocating to the Ridgeland area. I posed a question about that as well but I have yet to receive any replies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama View Post
I think the only way to help the Delta would be to help the children, because they are the future. .........
You deserve a ton of respect Mississippi Girl. I agree totally about the children. Any suggestions?[/quote]


Thanks Tama. One suggestion would be to have someone open a YMCA or something of the like where the children could have more contructive things to do with their time. Another thing would be to appoint black leaders that sincerely care more about the progression of the community and less about making eloquent speeches and wearing fine clothing and driving luxury vehicles when they are out and about in the town. The mayor of Clarksdale (a highly revered BLACK man) lives in one of the most poverty stricken areas of the town, yet HIS house is immaculately clean and ostentacious compared to the slums that are not even 2 feet outside of his doorstep. He drives a 100,000 Mercedes, and over half of the citizens of his community are unemployed. The black community needs workers, not leaders, because anyone can talk about and pinpoint the problems, but who is willing to fix them?? My one voice and one hand alone can't do it. Also, I would suggest that more children be encouraged to read about their history and culture (past the Dr. Martin Luther King speech and outside of Black History month) so that they can be aware of how much blood was shed on this very ground they take for granted so that they could have the opportunities that we have today. King Cotton still rules the Delta!! I can drive 10 minutes and end up on a real live plantation, complete with shotgun shacks and fieldhands, who are still working for massa of their own free will!! Oh, I could go on and on. I am only 23, but I think I was born with an old soul or perhaps I am just one of the few younger people who realizes that the future has a past.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama View Post
I live in South Mississippi and have never been to the Delta. I have, however, heard the horror stories. Would like to pose a question. How can people who are not motivated-if we accept that premise-become so? I think, and would like to know your thoughts-that it must start with the really young. Would something like the school Oprah started in South Africa be an answer? The kids would board and have a whole different set of mentors and teachers and opportunties to learn HOW to achieve goals. They would be selected for willingness to try something different in ther lives with their parents approval and would for all practical purposes be removed to a different world within the old world. It should have the amenities that Oprah's school has for incentives and rewards. Then these graduates would be given the grants and the assistance needed to start businesses and improve the area. The only problem is would they stay within the community. Perhaps each would be required to write a project on a way to contribute to the community that they would have to have accepted and fulfilled as a requirement for graduation.
To answer this question I would say that they are unmotivated because they don't have any examples of SUCCESS. The SUCCESSFUL people that they encounter want nothing to do with them and even the blacks who could reach them are too ashamed to identify with "those people" and therefore treat them much the same as the whites. All of the people they see that are "living good" are living wrong, therefore when they emulate these people they end of doing the wrong things to "live good" such as sell drugs, steal, kill, etc. Education is not as encouraged as in other places, so school is not a priority. A lot of the kids are so poor, they are ashamed to go to school in their attire because it may not be suitable around their peers. The children are not taught about self-love, so they have no self-worth or self-respect, thus the high teenage pregnancy rates and high mortality rates. Poverty spawns violence!! The black girls, who oftentimes have no father in the home, seek acceptance from older guys who in turn exploit these young girls because THEY too have no guidance or model man in the home to pattern their lives after. The future holds no promise for these children, so they stop caring the same way that their parents did......They end up raising dysfunctional children and it just continues......

Last edited by Marka; 01-17-2007 at 04:29 AM.. Reason: merged
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-17-2007, 07:22 PM
 
1,350 posts, read 3,615,181 times
Reputation: 1264
Mississippi Girl-you seem to have the ability to see beyond what must have at times been personal frustration at the struggle you had to make to reach your aspirations. I wish you the most success--Mississippi is fortunate to have you-- and maybe some day, you will have an opportunity to speak out and address the points you made so well. It seems like we must be years away from interrupting this circle of failure. I have suggested in another post that a school that provides a total environment for the kids may be the only hope--but that may be politically and socially unacceptable to too many.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2007, 09:26 PM
 
9 posts, read 26,860 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippi_Girl View Post

Thanks Tama. One suggestion would be to have someone open a YMCA or something of the like where the children could have more contructive things to do with their time. Another thing would be to appoint black leaders that sincerely care more about the progression of the community and less about making eloquent speeches and wearing fine clothing and driving luxury vehicles when they are out and about in the town.
There is a lot of wisdom in your posts Mississipi-Girl. You do sound like an old soul.

I agree with your point about electing new leadership, both in the white and black communities! Back in the sixties, we were truly blessed to have leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr., a person who not only had truth on his side but also had no personal agenda. He was a very family-oriented person and he was trying to elevate the black community as a whole. Unfortunately, everything changed when he was murdered and these new leaders started popping up (i.e. Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton.) They preach a message of despair and victimization; that there is no hope because the world is so full of racism and hate. They run in when they see an opportunity to make some money and get some press off of some minor event but when it comes to helping the community as a whole, they disappear.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2007, 07:45 PM
 
5 posts, read 15,491 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tama View Post
Mississippi Girl-you seem to have the ability to see beyond what must have at times been personal frustration at the struggle you had to make to reach your aspirations. I wish you the most success--Mississippi is fortunate to have you-- and maybe some day, you will have an opportunity to speak out and address the points you made so well. It seems like we must be years away from interrupting this circle of failure. I have suggested in another post that a school that provides a total environment for the kids may be the only hope--but that may be politically and socially unacceptable to too many.
Thanks Tama for your well wishes and perhaps I will have the opportunity to speak out one day. But for now, I spread my thoughts to as many people who will listen and I thank you for taking the time to read my thoughts. As for your latter statement, I do believe that would prove true......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2007, 07:50 PM
 
5 posts, read 15,491 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by zenny View Post
There is a lot of wisdom in your posts Mississipi-Girl. You do sound like an old soul.

I agree with your point about electing new leadership, both in the white and black communities! Back in the sixties, we were truly blessed to have leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr., a person who not only had truth on his side but also had no personal agenda. He was a very family-oriented person and he was trying to elevate the black community as a whole. Unfortunately, everything changed when he was murdered and these new leaders started popping up (i.e. Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton.) They preach a message of despair and victimization; that there is no hope because the world is so full of racism and hate. They run in when they see an opportunity to make some money and get some press off of some minor event but when it comes to helping the community as a whole, they disappear.
It's good to know that I'm not the only one who feels this way Zenny.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2007, 01:34 PM
 
3 posts, read 8,466 times
Reputation: 17
Hi. I really feel compelled to reply to your message and correct some of the misinformation included in it. I am a teacher in Jonestown and I live in Clarksdale Mississippi. First of all, nobody is GIVING away any land in Mississippi. Land in the Delta is very valuable because it's rich soils can grow cotton, corn and soy, among other things. When land is sold, its not done so publicly because, and let's just be clear, white farmers are selling this land among themselves. When we talk about people of color in Jonestown, we are talking about the direct descendants of slaves and sharecroppers. Yes, their education level may be low, but this is partly because of the systemic factors in place that keep schools segregted and performing below standards (Yes, they are still segregated! I have taught in Jonestown 4 years, and NEVER taught a white child yet).

Businesses are scarce in parts of the Delta because plants such as Toyota are choosing the BEST places in the Delta to come to and hire. Places like Tupelo, which is integrated and has integrated schools, is going to the be the new site of business because the education system is better there, and because there is a more diverse demographic to choose from. You talk about the people in Jonestown needing to open their own businesses. I ask you WITH WHAT? Where is all this money being given away. Link the grant application to your reply so we can see the examples of money being given away to people in the Delta. And do they have internet access? Do they have a library in Jonestown where they can access computers? No. Do they all have cars to get to Clarksdale to get to the nearest library to use the computers? No. Let's be real. Talk about what you know about. We all believe, as Americans that you can pull yourself up by your bootstraps. However, people in Jonestown may not even HAVE BOOTS! The education system have systemically shut out blacks in the Delta. There is limited access to good health care. I have a master's degree, and had an extremely tough time getting good prenatal care. You have to wait as much as 5 hours for a SCHEDULED pre-natal appointment! These are Americans. There is limited access to PRODUCE. Fresh produce. Lettuce. Tomatoes. Not available in Jonestown.

The parents in Jonestown are extremely hard working people. Many of them drive 45 minutes each way to just get work at Tunica, because there is no place in Jonestown to work. There are few family owned businesses and they are not hiring. Period. These posts are extremely offensive to me. Let's be honest. The people of Jonestown, and other Mississippi Delta towns are Americans, just as hard working as the rest of us. We have these grandiose notions of the unworthy poor blacks in Jonestown and how they have contributed to their own poverty. But let's also look at how all of us contribute to the problems. White farmers get subsidies from the government and there are other international laws that prohibit the storage of cotton seeds and other farming needs that keep black farmers shut out from the process.

I want the children and the families in Jonestown to have some change happen in their community. Let's not place the blame on them, though, when there's plenty to go around. The income gap, the education gap, and the segregation that still takes place in the Delta needs to be addressed as well as getting people motivated, and trained with the skills to become successful, get some boots and then be able to pull themselves up by their boot straps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2007, 04:12 PM
 
130 posts, read 112,943 times
Reputation: 41
Toyota said no to the Delta after several offers from Delta Counties.It was published in the Mississippi Business journal.Land is and has been for sale/foreclosure in the Delta for sale to ANYONE.The trick to some people is it is not free.I have had a hard life and i made it in a more harsh environment.I have invested in real estate, Enforced Law and curently earn a great living at my current job.I'am here to tell you THE WORLD OWES YOU NOTHING!!! not even the boots!
When i invest in real estate i use certain federal grants all the time and i don't use the internet to access them the local bank is put in charge of the grants the money is not "given away" which is the big problem to the people in the Delta.Although it is odd you claim there are no grants but many are on public assistance for housing and food.
Make no mistake the biggest enemy of the people of the Delta are the people of the Delta.Out of wedlock babies, aids, murder, rape etc. etc. etc. Crime rates with the same ratio as Chicago, Il. Federal Bureau of Investigation - Home Page for your convience.
Kennedymom, I have worked all night and spent the day WITH MY CHILDREN i'am really tired I'am going to go to bed in the HOME I HAVE MADE FOR MY FAMILY.Maybe, this is where the problem in the Delta lies in the home? get the point?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2007, 06:57 PM
 
3 posts, read 8,466 times
Reputation: 17
Again, I'd like to reply to your message. First of all, I realize the world owes me nothing. I paid my own way through college after growing up in Chicago, whose crime statistics you quote, so I'm sure you are aware of how tough it is. I don't expect to be given anything at all, and I believe the people in the Delta would also like to be self-sufficient. Nobody wants to live 30,000 dollars BELOW the poverty level, no matter how little or much you have to work. Nobody wants to live in substandard housing. You should look at Fox News in Memphis and see the housing standards for some of the families in the Delta.

I don't expect grant money to be given away in the Delta, as you say people here expect, nor did I say there wasn't any grant money. I challenged you to locate some of the grants that you said when you referenced that money was being given away.

I think what lots of people, and seemingly you as well, fail to realize is that lots of people still work hard, 8 or 10 hours a day, and still live in poverty. Your thinking reflects that of someone who has a very limited perspective and very little compassion for others. Lots of people are on public aid for housing and food, and still work a job everyday, manage to do that with or without vehicles, and still are involved in the children's education, volunteer in the community and want to move out of the Delta, but hardly have the resources to make it from day to day. For example, I taught a child this year who had a mother who worked full time at the school in the lunchroom, was a full time college student, and still volunteered with the nuns at the local afterschool tutoring program. These are hard working families and I think what you and lots of other people fail to see is the effort that lots of people put forth to survive.

You would like to imagine that people in the Delta are poor because they are lazy and have no work ethic. That may indeed be true for some, but the reality of the situation is that myself and other teachers, the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary and lots of politicians in this area are working to break the vicious cycle of poverty. Families here need and want more than just a handout. They want their children to be taught in good schools, and not failing ones. They want to learn to acccess banks so they too can utilize federal grants, just like you. By the way, don't you think that some banks use discriminatory practices when allocating grant money? Be serious. You talk about "out of wedlock babies, AIDS, murder, rape, etc" in an effort to criminalize and dehumanize the people of the Delta. But the reality is this: just as you and I have made homes for our families, the people of the Delta want the same thing. And maybe they don't have the knowledge to gain the same things that we have been able to gain with few resources, but how much blame can you put on someone who doesn't know something? And you and other people like you would rather point a finger of blame rather than do something about the problem so you can continue to use yourself as a shining example of how a protestant work ethic served to elevate you to a higher standard of living and earning.

You talk about the problems of the Delta being in the home and with the people. How many homes have you been to in the Delta? How many times have you volunteered in the Delta? When have you even been to the Delta? How many parents do you talk to on a weekly basis who are frustrated because they have recieved an inadequate education and aren't able to help their fourth grader with her homework? How many times have you offered your expertise in securing land grants to help someone else learn to secure one? At least I'm using my education (which I paid for) to teach other people, and not blaming them for what they don't know. I'm trying to do something about the cycle of undereducation within the underclass. At least I use myself as an example to my students to show them that when you work hard and stay in school, you can own your own home (yes, I own my own home) and when you wait to have children and create a family, that good things result.

I want to acknowledge that I don't agree with self-victimization, having babies out of wedlock or any other un-American values that I know you hold near and dear. However, let's not blame people in the Delta without also acknowledging that the system has failed them too. I'm not saying that the people don't have to get up and make things better for themselves. I do believe that what helps people the most is a hand-up, not a hand-out NOR your FINGER POINTING! If you want to do something productive, come to Jonestown, lead a session on how to secure a land grant, and use it to build wealth, since you know so much about the process. Or come teach down here, since there is a Critical Teacher Shortage. Or come and lead a workshop on Parenting, since you seem to have such expertise in it. If you'd rather not do any of those things, or think it's not your place, then consider yourself a part of the problem and stop down-talking people in the Delta because you, like everyone else, has an opportunity to help. After all, helping is the American thing to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2007, 06:40 PM
 
376 posts, read 1,619,442 times
Reputation: 153
Tama, that is a nice idea, but the people in the Delta aren't like people from anywhere else. All they care about is getting a handout from the government. They believe they are entitled to it. It's not just the poor blacks but also the rich white landowners who get millions in subsidies from the government. The Delta is basically a ward of the state. The only way it is going to get any better is if they are cut off. Then they'll learn to fend for themselves. Only then will the Delta rise above its current miserable state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2007, 06:55 AM
 
130 posts, read 112,943 times
Reputation: 41
Kennedymom.

I can not offer any advice to someone who apparently knows everything about the Delta and its people.You sound like a very intelligent person and i wish you success.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Mississippi
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:50 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top