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Old 02-02-2015, 11:46 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
18,675 posts, read 10,983,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Repubocrat View Post
Thanks for the suggestion Honestly, I would never pay 300 K for a home. My idea of retirement in Mississippi would be as simple as possible. Even if I happen to accumulate a few million by the time I retire, I would not want anybody to know.

I am a Wrangler, cowboy hat, small town, F 350/Silverado 3500 kinda guy Money has never/will never define/change me
You'll do fine. Sometimes I wonder about all these people who are skeert of people who are not just like them.

My fine ride looks like this:

Bought it new in '90. Been ridin' it ever since..... Udn-Udn....
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Old 02-02-2015, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Floribama
17,462 posts, read 35,351,141 times
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I'd certainly pick the NE corner of the state (Corinth) over the delta region.
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Old 11-19-2015, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
10,062 posts, read 10,604,807 times
Reputation: 7168
Old times here are not forgotten, much less forgiven.

How White Flight Ravaged the Mississippi Delta - The Atlantic
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Old 11-19-2015, 03:43 PM
 
65,489 posts, read 91,284,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Old times here are not forgotten, much less forgiven.

How White Flight Ravaged the Mississippi Delta - The Atlantic
That is my father' hometown! Tchula, that is.....Ironically, my dad was telling recently about working on the plantation of a state politician(the politician's last name was Love).He was telling me about how there were many Black farmers in Holmes County that lived in a community just outside of Tchula by the name of Mileston. he also told me about growing up with Curtis Granderson's family(current NY Met), who is also originally from Tchula and going to school with the family of Johnny Mitchell who was a former TE at the University of Nebraska and with the NY Jets. Mitchell's family lived in Mileston. He also couldn't believe that the old HS he attended, recently called S.V. Marshall High, but was called the Tchula Attendance Center when he was going there, had consolidated to become Holmes County Central High. S.V. Marshall was a former administrator at the Tchula Attendance Center.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 11-19-2015 at 03:54 PM..
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Old 11-20-2015, 02:11 AM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest & NYC Central Park South
3,327 posts, read 4,591,972 times
Reputation: 12608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Old times here are not forgotten, much less forgiven.

How White Flight Ravaged the Mississippi Delta - The Atlantic
I found the "Fading columned mansion" of Sarah Virginia Jones. ( https://www.google.com/maps/@33.1804...7i13312!8i6656 ) It clearly began as one of the standard one-room-deep, two-stories-tall, pioneer small plantation-owner 'starter-homes' you see all over the state. I think the carpenters would just come to your farm, in the early days, and build that design, reusing some pattern book, until, after the twentieth one, they knew it by heart. Looks like this wretched example had a series of increasingly clunky additions, over the years. The 1960s touches (such as the horrid " wrought iron balcony" over the entrance doors) are absolutely appalling. Calling that mess a "mansion" is really a stretch. I don't think the downstairs rooms are even twelve feet tall. And the current resident has done NOTHING to improve the place. Apparently, he does not believe in foundation plantings.

And so the article goes. Reality is distorted/misinterpreted/ignored/invented to fit an agenda the "author" had, long before went down to Mississippi. The author's notions are so childish, betraying a complete lack of understanding of the ways things work in this world, I can't even begin to comment.

But I'm pretty sure that the white people left, because they wanted to be able to make a living. They moved to places where they could make a living. We're not white, but DH and I went off to college, and then moved to a city (Jackson), because there was nothing for us in the little places where we grew up. I'm sure that this is what the white people (and many Blacks) of Tchula did, too. There was no opportunity in Tchula, for somebody who was not a big farmer, and so they moved away. This is what people ALL OVER AMERICA have been doing, for generations. This started happening around the time of the Great Depression. It has little or nothing to do with "White Flight".

A few times, I've driven from Madison to Malibu. I've stopped in (or among the ruins of) plenty of little Texas towns that dried-up, even when those parts of Texas had nothing but Swedes and Czechs and Germans, as far as the eye could see. The towns dried up, because people moved away. Matters of economics, climate, and cataclysms (such as the Dust Bowl) made some places more viable than others. And people moved to places which were viable.

But the author here seems not to understand much about how the world works.

Last edited by GrandviewGloria; 11-20-2015 at 02:49 AM..
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Old 11-20-2015, 07:08 AM
 
65,489 posts, read 91,284,819 times
Reputation: 14333
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandviewGloria View Post
I found the "Fading columned mansion" of Sarah Virginia Jones. ( https://www.google.com/maps/@33.1804...7i13312!8i6656 ) It clearly began as one of the standard one-room-deep, two-stories-tall, pioneer small plantation-owner 'starter-homes' you see all over the state. I think the carpenters would just come to your farm, in the early days, and build that design, reusing some pattern book, until, after the twentieth one, they knew it by heart. Looks like this wretched example had a series of increasingly clunky additions, over the years. The 1960s touches (such as the horrid " wrought iron balcony" over the entrance doors) are absolutely appalling. Calling that mess a "mansion" is really a stretch. I don't think the downstairs rooms are even twelve feet tall. And the current resident has done NOTHING to improve the place. Apparently, he does not believe in foundation plantings.

And so the article goes. Reality is distorted/misinterpreted/ignored/invented to fit an agenda the "author" had, long before went down to Mississippi. The author's notions are so childish, betraying a complete lack of understanding of the ways things work in this world, I can't even begin to comment.

But I'm pretty sure that the white people left, because they wanted to be able to make a living. They moved to places where they could make a living. We're not white, but DH and I went off to college, and then moved to a city (Jackson), because there was nothing for us in the little places where we grew up. I'm sure that this is what the white people (and many Blacks) of Tchula did, too. There was no opportunity in Tchula, for somebody who was not a big farmer, and so they moved away. This is what people ALL OVER AMERICA have been doing, for generations. This started happening around the time of the Great Depression. It has little or nothing to do with "White Flight".

A few times, I've driven from Madison to Malibu. I've stopped in (or among the ruins of) plenty of little Texas towns that dried-up, even when those parts of Texas had nothing but Swedes and Czechs and Germans, as far as the eye could see. The towns dried up, because people moved away. Matters of economics, climate, and cataclysms (such as the Dust Bowl) made some places more viable than others. And people moved to places which were viable.

But the author here seems not to understand much about how the world works.
True and I think many make White Flight and economic flight synonymous, when it isn't necessarily that simple. With that said, the white population in Tchula has left in a relatively faster rate and did control the economic aspects of the town, by and large. So, when they left or died off, it steadily changed the dynamics of the town, economically.

When my dad grew up there, there was a movie theater, a clothing store owned by a Jewish family, another store owned by a Chinese family and infrastructure was intact.

Mr. Love's(politician) son passed away in the early 90's and left a nice mansion by the lake.

As for Roosevelt Granderson, they say hitmen from St. Louis may have been involved.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 11-20-2015 at 07:21 AM..
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Old 11-20-2015, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
10,062 posts, read 10,604,807 times
Reputation: 7168
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandviewGloria View Post
I found the "Fading columned mansion" of Sarah Virginia Jones. ( https://www.google.com/maps/@33.1804...7i13312!8i6656 ) It clearly began as one of the standard one-room-deep, two-stories-tall, pioneer small plantation-owner 'starter-homes' you see all over the state.

How do you know that is the correct house?
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Old 11-22-2015, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest & NYC Central Park South
3,327 posts, read 4,591,972 times
Reputation: 12608
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
True and I think many make White Flight and economic flight synonymous, when it isn't necessarily that simple. With that said, the white population in Tchula has left in a relatively faster rate and did control the economic aspects of the town, by and large. So, when they left or died off, it steadily changed the dynamics of the town, economically.

When my dad grew up there, there was a movie theater, a clothing store owned by a Jewish family, another store owned by a Chinese family and infrastructure was intact.

Mr. Love's(politician) son passed away in the early 90's and left a nice mansion by the lake.

As for Roosevelt Granderson, they say hitmen from St. Louis may have been involved.
Having had control of their town wrested from them could certainly have accelerated the move. It may have served as a wake-up call. But they were probably thinking about leaving, long before that. Sometimes, it takes a little shock, to motivate one. We had been planning on moving "somewhere", since DH and I had become an item.

But job offers turned into careers, which turned into corporations, which seemingly immured us in Jackson. We kept on planning, though. We rented a house in the Malibu Colony, and then bought a Malibu Homesite which seemed to float in clouds, above the Pacific. The kids, however, were unimpressed by LA, and by Pepperdine (which, we thought, would be so handy...). And we had so much going on in Madison.

My Husband hated the Mississippi heat. Our children found the social climate stultifying, dating prospects inferior, and local colleges to be nothing but "football JOKE SCHOOLS". They were begging me to leave. I was afraid our swarthy selves would not be able to carve-out another social niche, in a less forgiving milieu. I was afraid of reorganizing, to do business from another state.

I did not want to leave our "forever dream-home" - my bluebirds and ginger lilies, and the sound of our fountains, in our 'walled Creole compound'. I'd heard that people in the PNW look with disdain, upon fancy china. Like many Jacksonians, I had more patterns of fancy china than there were days in the week. Would people make fun of our gold-plated breakfast flatware? Would we be eating off depressing "earthy" plates? Would the crystal goblets sit in storerooms, while we drank from things looking like the Flintstones' rocks?

There's an old stock skit in the Yiddish Theatre, with a Mother adamant about staying-put. In would come one report after another, about the peasants killing everybody in the neighboring Jewish village - then the Cossacks killing everybody in another village. "But I just CAN'T leave Russia!" Mama would say, over and over, as reports become more and more dire. Finally, though, as the Cossacks are breaking through the door, bayonets ready to gut the family, as her husband is throwing her out the back window, Mama cries, "So I'm leaving Russia....".

Well, this mama's 'Leaving Russia Moment' came, when the local Country Music station (at the instigation of criminals intent upon destroying Madison's wonderful Mayor) began a campaign to remove the finials atop my favorite new building (http://www.city-data.com/forum/attac...cvs-ii-022.jpg). An old man, in a neighborhood with plastic fountains in the FRONT yards, its own predatory pedo, and a homeschooling family who apparently made life too miserable for their daughter to bear.... well, that neighborhood became a hotbed of hatred for the finials, and he went all over, collecting signatures on a petition, to force the city to force the developers to destroy the building. I'd been getting offers for our house, which I'd been refusing. But letting friends who were agents enter their numbers into my speed-dial, "just in case". I drove by that building, while cranes were taking the finials DOWN!!!! "OK! I'm leaving Russia!" I hit the speed dial, and that was that. Goodbye to my homeland and my dream-home.

Turned out, everything is better here. When we were reorganizing, I moved most functions offshore, and now have time to play. We endured a 'Brutalist Masterpiece' Modern house, for a few years, while establishing ourselves, socially, and then built something less minimal and more me. My Husband can wear suits seven days a week, now that heat is not a problem. Our sons can find makeup-free ultrablondes with whom to romp, and we don't have to hear one damn word about Ole Miss Fuhbawl!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
How do you know that is the correct house?
Because I found this article (Poorest town in poorest state: segregation is gone but so are the jobs | US news | The Guardian Scroll way down, and you see the former Mayor, in front of the house), then went to Google Earth, and "drove around", until I found it.

And if the cheesy, 1950s 'mansionization' of what seems to have been a late Victorian farmhouse is any indication of the quality of the "...nearly 400 works by artists as prominent as Paul Cezanne, Marc Chagall, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Salvador Dali, and Andy Warhol", then I suspect that what the author is trying to have us believe is a collection worthy of its own wing in a museum, is actually a collection of PRINTS, bought from an ordinary traveling salesman out of New Orleans. The museum in Jackson surely accepted the donation, but I cannot find any evidence of that, online. Probably, they sit in a storeroom, and individual works may be displayed, if they fit in with themed exhibits.

The author tries to have us believe that Miss Jones and her brother extracted vast wealth from their farm laborers' toils. But in reality, they seem to have made a decent living, and made the best of what they had - gussying-up a plain old house, and decorating with art prints by the most famous Modern artists. That's definitely better than the majority of Delta people, who tore down substantial old houses, and built "Fine new BRICK HOMES!" (brick veneer, slab-on-grade, tarpaper-roofed ranch houses with eight-foot-high popcorn ceilings, built from "plans" you ordered), then hung the walls with 3-way Bible scenes (3 different Technicolor-toned inspirational scenes, depending on where you're standing in the room!), Dogs Playing Poker, Scenes of Archie Manning making Missippi proud, and Olan Mills family 'portraits' - or just whatever "framed landscapes" went with the "furniture suits" ("suites" sounded too prissy) they bought at the furniture store.

I know someone from a family similar to that of Miss Jones, in terms of 'making a lot out of a little'. In the late Fifties, they bought Federal Period courthouse for virtually nothing, and moved it onto their plantation. This followed a few good crops (made by German prisoners of war, who were the best laborers imaginable). But before those good crops, there were years of desperation - sometimes with poverty for the plantation OWNERS so deep there was no money for driving a sick child to the doctor - even had there been money for a doctor. Anyway, the family's most cherished possessions, NOW (today, the far-flung extended family - having fled Mississippi and its incompetent labor - own two private jets, several multi-million-Dollar vacation homes, and a great many politicians) - but NOW, they still cherish "The Renoir", and "The Picasso" - prints, ordered out of a magazine, in 1930, by the family's founding matriarch, as an impoverished young bride. She borrowed a mitre box, and, using an ordinary saw, cut down the good parts of two old picture frames, and made new ones, to fit her prints. Then, she used brown shoe polish, to tone down the prints. Three-quarters of a century later, "The Renoir" and "The Picasso" look real. They hang in bedrooms, in much finer mansions, in states a day's drive from Mississippi - amid fine antiques bought by that matriarch, from black families who'd been given them as cast-offs, when they'd gone out of style: seventy five Cents, five Dollars... they were glad to get rid of that old stuff.

Nobody knows where they are, but she also bought the columns from a mansion being leveled by a white trash family (so they could build a "Fine BRICK home!" on the site), and like Miss Jones, was going to add the columns (but infinitely finer ones) to the front of her Greek Revival courthouse. Unfortunately, the Kennedy/Johnson "Great Society" spelled doom for her husband's deeply leveraged farming operations, and the family lost their plantations. A Pentecostal family, eventually, bought the house, and tore it down, so they could build a "Fine BRICK home!".

I suspect that what happened to that family is what happened to many of the people in Tchula. Washington's social engineering was the final straw. The cataclysmic Cotton Panic of '25 was only forty years distant. People were still deeply in debt, many families having started with zero equity, during the Depression. They were sent hurtling into the larger world. OF COURSE they moved away. Farming was now seen as being too risky. They moved to Jackson and Atlanta and Dallas, and DID WELL, for the most part. When we moved to Jackson, there were a few men there, who were from "Cruger-Tchula". The were some of the most beautiful blond studs I've ever seen - better looking than the blonds from around Gluckstadt, who were plenty-hot, themselves. I guess they've taken early retirement, now, and moved to whatever far-distant states their children have chosen.
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Old 12-01-2015, 11:37 AM
 
1,519 posts, read 1,115,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gvillesux View Post
the delta has a way of life all its own, you won't understand it for a while so just prepare yourself.
I believe you 100%. I knew a black couple in California. The husband was promoted at UPS took a managerial position in a small town in the Arkansas delta. Initially, they saw it as a chance to escape from everything wrong in California. Two years and one expensive move later, they were back in California. When I asked them about it, they said the Delta was "just different"- and it did not matter whether you were black or white.
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