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Old 05-22-2016, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
12,065 posts, read 10,745,057 times
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If you look at migration patterns, FL/NC/SC/GA/TN/TX have been having many people moving from northern and western states and their culture is starting to change drastically. I hear even AL is getting some of it, to a lesser degree, and even parts of LA like New Orleans is getting hipsters and Lafayette is the "new Austin."

So, is it the case that MS is the only true southern state left? I'm thinking that it retains a very Deep South culture.

The whites that I know from MS all seem to have negative things to say about the economy, but have cherished memories of the food and the hospitality.

Also, having talking to African Americans in Chicago and other northern cities that have parents or grandparents that had lived in MS, they all have favorable opinions of an almost ideal low stress rural existence. Indeed, you see some blacks retiring in MS because they miss that rural atmosphere. This belies the fact that MS is prejudiced, which it is, but it seems that it may manifest itself differently than in the north?

I'm wondering if the only thing that is holding these people from returning is the economy? If there were good jobs in MS would it become a desirable destination? Or is this just romanticizing something that really is a terrible environment?

I've only been to Vicksburg, Jackson, Meridien, and the Gulf Coast, so I'm no expert. It seems, however, that MS may be the most underrated state in America?

Please comment if you are a MS native (either currently in state or out of state) and have insights?
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Old 05-22-2016, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
3,253 posts, read 4,362,315 times
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I dunno. Large chunks of Texas are as Deep South/Texan as ever given these last 10 years politically.

But in Mississippi's case. Oxford. This last fall showed that the place has become hipster central.
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Old 05-23-2016, 08:40 AM
 
Location: MS
4,395 posts, read 4,337,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
....

Also, having talking to African Americans in Chicago and other northern cities that have parents or grandparents that had lived in MS, they all have favorable opinions of an almost ideal low stress rural existence. Indeed, you see some blacks retiring in MS because they miss that rural atmosphere. This belies the fact that MS is prejudiced, which it is, but it seems that it may manifest itself differently than in the north?

I'm wondering if the only thing that is holding these people from returning is the economy? If there were good jobs in MS would it become a desirable destination? Or is this just romanticizing something that really is a terrible environment?

I've only been to Vicksburg, Jackson, Meridien, and the Gulf Coast, so I'm no expert. It seems, however, that MS may be the most underrated state in America?

Please comment if you are a MS native (either currently in state or out of state) and have insights?
You have been to 4 locations in MS but you can say as fact that the entire state is prejudiced?
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Old 05-23-2016, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
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Originally Posted by Robert_J View Post
You have been to 4 locations in MS but you can say as fact that the entire state is prejudiced?
I myself have been to a handful of towns (Oxford, Senatobia, Horn Lake/Southaven/Hernando, Vicksburg, Natchez and Corinth) and I even I can say I haven't seen the whole picture of the state yet. But I did get a good taste of it.
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Old 05-23-2016, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Originally Posted by Robert_J View Post
You have been to 4 locations in MS but you can say as fact that the entire state is prejudiced?
Educate me then.
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Old 05-23-2016, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Alabama
1,641 posts, read 2,833,509 times
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No. Alabama is still Deep South. Southern states have always received migrants from the North. Their children typically assimilate into Southern culture. Florida is a notable exception based on the fact that when it was truly Southern in culture, its population was so small that the southern-bred "crackers" were drowned out by sheer numbers, and Florida's main population centers were developed by and for northerners.

It might be true that the South has received a larger number of northern migrants over the past 20 years or so due to the racial turmoil generation dying out, but northerners who move to Alabama know that they are moving to the South and I think that's a positive for most, so they don't try to change things.

If you look at the demographics of people moving to the coastal areas of SC and GA particularly, they are mostly retirees, so they are not influencing cultural change, though they are undoubtedly changing the economics of the areas.

The only parts of AL that you could argue have seen cultural change away from traditional "Deep South" would be Huntsville and the small coastal area (southern Baldwin county). Given that they are only two small regions tucked away in the extreme corners of the state, I don't think it affects the state as a whole.
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Old 05-23-2016, 11:38 PM
Status: "Trump: Taxcheating Racist Under Master Putin" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Dallas, TX
4,429 posts, read 2,461,831 times
Reputation: 4221
I gotta agree with FSUMike. Even with massive southern migration, the "changes" seem to be very localized. Large parts of Georgia and North Florida inland from the sea are still quite "Southern". Even a mass migration's impact on the culture, is going to be restricted for a very long time to its local area. Areas of Texas away from the urban metros still did not cause smaller city and small town Texas to abandon its culture. In fact, Ft Worth positively celebrate its cowboy roots despite growing every bit as quickly as Dallas.
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Old 05-24-2016, 02:21 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn Center, MN
6,529 posts, read 4,123,451 times
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Okay one thing, deep south culture is different from SOUTHERN culture. Southern culture is an umbrella term for the culture of the south, while the deep south is a specific region, and Texas btw, besides the southeastern area around Houston and Beaumont, never really was deep south. It's western/plains with a more upper south influence in much of the state, plus a huge Mexican influence.

MS is not the only state with its strong deep south culture, though. Louisiana is as deep south as you can get while still being an extremely unique state. Alabama too.
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Old 05-24-2016, 06:51 AM
 
Location: MS
4,395 posts, read 4,337,086 times
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Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Educate me then.
It was your statement. Back it up with some facts. Based on past experience on this forum, anything I say will be dismissed as anecdotal evidence.
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Old 05-24-2016, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
3,253 posts, read 4,362,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Okay one thing, deep south culture is different from SOUTHERN culture. Southern culture is an umbrella term for the culture of the south, while the deep south is a specific region, and Texas btw, besides the southeastern area around Houston and Beaumont, never really was deep south. It's western/plains with a more upper south influence in much of the state, plus a huge Mexican influence.

MS is not the only state with its strong deep south culture, though. Louisiana is as deep south as you can get while still being an extremely unique state. Alabama too.
You forgot about Marshall and just about everything East of Dallas, not to mention towns like Lufkin, Carthage, Atlanta, Greenville, Tyler/Longview.

There are some extremely Deep South-ish parts of Texas.
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