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Old 01-09-2018, 01:08 PM
 
183 posts, read 127,090 times
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Aside from barbecue, what foods are Mississippi proud of?
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Old 01-09-2018, 01:31 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,931 posts, read 2,084,839 times
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I'm not from Mississippi, but Mississippi, probably more than any other state, is well known thru out the country for its catfish.

Though not quite as well known to outsiders as Mississippi catfish, what might surprise many folks, Mississippi is somewhat of a Mecca for tamales.

Go to YouTube and type in the search box, "Mississippi tamales" and dozens of videos on the subject will come up.
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Old 01-09-2018, 01:47 PM
 
183 posts, read 127,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I'm not from Mississippi, but Mississippi, probably more than any other state, is well known thru out the country for its catfish.

Though not quite as well known to outsiders as Mississippi catfish, what might surprise many folks, Mississippi is somewhat of a Mecca for tamales.

Go to YouTube and type in the search box, "Mississippi tamales" and dozens of videos on the subject will come up.
Whaaaat? Hmmm that makes sense. I passed a place in Natchez called Hot Mama's or Tamale Mama or something like that

i love catfish
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Old 01-09-2018, 04:59 PM
 
803 posts, read 762,989 times
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Comeback, Cumbak, Kumbak, or however you want to spell it, is truly a Mississippi creation, Jackson specifically. Some speculate it started at the Mayflower, but others claim a few other (now closed) restaurants in the area.

Anyway, although now offered by several restaurants (Cerchales, GA Blue, Hal and Mals, etc.) real comeback can only be acquired at the Elite or Mayflower. Never, never, never buy prepackaged comeback from a grocery store. The lady at the Mayflower is a stickler for refrigeration of their comeback, oddly the Elite owner is more lax on that requirement (both these restaurants have been in their original locations for many years (75?) and may have trouble passing a legitimate health department inspection, despite being regular dining locations of MS powerbrokers). You can purchase a bottle from the Mayflower (if they made enough that morning), but they will not ship. The Elite does not offer a bottled version for sale.
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Old 01-09-2018, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Lake Oswego, Manhattan, Aspen
3,227 posts, read 4,174,918 times
Reputation: 11570
Cornbread

Butterbeans, cooked with fat pork

Greens (Collard, Turnip, or Mustard greens), cooked with fatty pieces of pork, until brown and slimy

Naennurrr Pueid'nn

Pound Cake

Snap Beans, cooked with pork fat meat

Fried Chicken

White bread, dumped out of bags and onto platters, and grabbed by the menfolk, partly as a utensil, to wipe food off plates and into mouths

Peach Cobbler

Dewberry Cobbler

VIIII-uaeeeee-nuh Sawsidges (rhymes with Hyena) http://bayanistore.com/images/detail...na_sausage.jpg

Potted Meat

Saltine Crackers

Buhlownuae Sandwiches

Okra (boiled or fried) And truly, Okra has my vote for the 'Most Mississippi' of all foods. I love Okra, and could have it three times a day, fried, boiled, pickled, and in Gumbo, for the rest of my life, without complaint. It's a superfood, and one of the few edibles which truly thrive in Mississippi's abominable heat.

Bisquits

Peanuts, roasted or boiled

Rolls

Fig Preserves*

PUH-kawhn Piiiiiii

Cucumber, sliced fresh, and placed on the table, in a dish with vinegar**

Hot sauce sitting out on the table (to make the overcooked greens more palatable)

Watermelons and Cantaloupes (as a child, you're taught to "Put sawlt awn um tuh muaeke um guuuid! 'cause they ain't guuuuid 'til yuh put sawlt awn um")
__________

* Fig preserves were mostly a "Rich People" thing, since only rich people were into permaculture. During the century following the Civil War, when NOBODY had ANY money, social class was largely discernible by what people had growing in their yards. "Rich" people and their servants - mostly women (since working in the heat, and the three big wars, killed most of the men) cultivated an amazing variety of edibles and ornamentals around their homes, while poor people were largely intolerant of plants, and only grew enough greens to keep themselves alive.

**Probably only a thing in "Rich" households. The classier rich people were purists, with just cucumber, vinegar & salt, while those committed to downward mobility, added sugar and onion.

Last edited by GrandviewGloria; 01-09-2018 at 11:25 PM..
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Old 01-10-2018, 08:53 AM
 
4,740 posts, read 8,751,601 times
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Slugburgers are found around Corinth:

"A slugburger is a burger made of a mixture of beef and some form of cheaper breading extender which is then deep-fat fried to a golden brown instead of grilled as common hamburger... The standard garnish for a slugburger is mustard, pickle and an ample dose of onions."

What are Slugburgers? « Slugburger Festival | Corinth, MS
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Old 01-10-2018, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Jack-town, Sip by way of AL and FL
966 posts, read 582,694 times
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Soul Food - this is very easy. While the BBQ is good, the Soul Food out-paces it. See Grandview Gloria's list. Down in South MS, you get the coastal/french type stuff.

I also agree with the catfish. Tons of farms around for that.
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Old 01-10-2018, 07:52 PM
 
803 posts, read 762,989 times
Reputation: 1501
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandviewGloria View Post
Cucumber, sliced fresh, and placed on the table, in a dish with vinegar**
Slight thread highjack, but has anyone tried the pickles at Newks (the ones on the table with the free breadsticks)? I don't know if they are considered bread and butter pickles or sweet pickles, but they are divine! I'm from an old school farming family and grew up with pot liquor, pepper sauce and sweet pickles aways on the table, never cared for country sweet pickles, but these are addicting! If crack tastes like Newks pickles, I see why people get hooked.
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Old 01-11-2018, 05:12 AM
 
803 posts, read 762,989 times
Reputation: 1501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faquetaique1840s View Post
What a weird list. I so would expect that... The question is: Where does one find dewberries ? Also, butter beans are supposed to be a New Orleans thing
in North MS, I grew up calling them butter beans and so did everyone I know. I don't think that's just a NOLA thang!
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Old 01-11-2018, 08:09 AM
 
Location: The South
5,123 posts, read 3,565,231 times
Reputation: 7695
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandviewGloria View Post
Cornbread

Butterbeans, cooked with fat pork

Greens (Collard, Turnip, or Mustard greens), cooked with fatty pieces of pork, until brown and slimy

Naennurrr Pueid'nn

Pound Cake

Snap Beans, cooked with pork fat meat

Fried Chicken

White bread, dumped out of bags and onto platters, and grabbed by the menfolk, partly as a utensil, to wipe food off plates and into mouths

Peach Cobbler

Dewberry Cobbler

VIIII-uaeeeee-nuh Sawsidges (rhymes with Hyena) http://bayanistore.com/images/detail...na_sausage.jpg

Potted Meat

Saltine Crackers

Buhlownuae Sandwiches

Okra (boiled or fried) And truly, Okra has my vote for the 'Most Mississippi' of all foods. I love Okra, and could have it three times a day, fried, boiled, pickled, and in Gumbo, for the rest of my life, without complaint. It's a superfood, and one of the few edibles which truly thrive in Mississippi's abominable heat.

Bisquits

Peanuts, roasted or boiled

Rolls

Fig Preserves*

PUH-kawhn Piiiiiii

Cucumber, sliced fresh, and placed on the table, in a dish with vinegar**

Hot sauce sitting out on the table (to make the overcooked greens more palatable)

Watermelons and Cantaloupes (as a child, you're taught to "Put sawlt awn um tuh muaeke um guuuid! 'cause they ain't guuuuid 'til yuh put sawlt awn um")
__________

* Fig preserves were mostly a "Rich People" thing, since only rich people were into permaculture. During the century following the Civil War, when NOBODY had ANY money, social class was largely discernible by what people had growing in their yards. "Rich" people and their servants - mostly women (since working in the heat, and the three big wars, killed most of the men) cultivated an amazing variety of edibles and ornamentals around their homes, while poor people were largely intolerant of plants, and only grew enough greens to keep themselves alive.

**Probably only a thing in "Rich" households. The classier rich people were purists, with just cucumber, vinegar & salt, while those committed to downward mobility, added sugar and onion.
Oh my my, that sounds good. I wonder how many folks know what a "Dewberry" is. I do.
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