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Old 05-16-2022, 04:20 PM
 
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I know the man these guys work for.
https://deltaagjournal.com/trading-p...issippi-delta/

I’ve met a few Afrikaner farm workers here.
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Old 05-16-2022, 07:12 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
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Imagine living in a place where being outside after dark is a rarity - and perhaps dangerous.
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Old 05-16-2022, 11:23 PM
 
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Our cities are similar to that, but we can drive a few minutes down the interstate to suburbs and be totally safe going to Kroger etc after dark. In Jackson from inside the city at a place like St. Dominics, it's literally just five minutes to safety in Ridgeland or two minutes to safety in Flowood. I hadn't considered what a huge blessing that is compared to Latin America and Africa.

Also generally inside our residential areas even in cities we're reasonably safe most of the time. It sounds like even in rural areas in South Africa it's not safe after dark which is kind of unique.

I guess we should be thankful because in Mississippi rural areas are extremely safe, presumably because it's easier for law enforcement to catch criminals in low-population areas. That's a blessing I hadn't considered but will remember to appreciate that luxury that we have here.
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Old 05-17-2022, 09:13 AM
 
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These guys have been coming to the Greenwood area for many years, and they do like to wear short shorts!

It seems the potato farmers prefer to use hispanic farm labor (maybe because is more manual/hard labor?), while cotton/soybeans/rice/corn farmers like the South Africans.

Most farmers don't use any imported labor, but you do see these guys around occasionally.
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Old 05-17-2022, 07:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brickpatio2018 View Post
Our cities are similar to that, but we can drive a few minutes down the interstate to suburbs and be totally safe going to Kroger etc after dark. In Jackson from inside the city at a place like St. Dominics, it's literally just five minutes to safety in Ridgeland or two minutes to safety in Flowood. I hadn't considered what a huge blessing that is compared to Latin America and Africa.

Also generally inside our residential areas even in cities we're reasonably safe most of the time. It sounds like even in rural areas in South Africa it's not safe after dark which is kind of unique.

I guess we should be thankful because in Mississippi rural areas are extremely safe, presumably because it's easier for law enforcement to catch criminals in low-population areas. That's a blessing I hadn't considered but will remember to appreciate that luxury that we have here.
I'm not sure if LE is the reason for low crime in rural areas. I own some remote properties in a county that has very little LE, if I needed them the closest would be a half hour away and that's if they could find me (and i had cell service to call). I think the prevalence of people who are at least moderately proficient with a shotgun is likely the biggest deterrent. Additionally not many are going to drive around rural Carroll/Montgomery/Grenada/Webster/Leflore/Tally counties looking for a potential target of opportunity, too much ground to cover and too many eyes watching for unfamiliar vehicles. Much of the theft in rural settings is when the thief knows there is something of value that is easy to steal (like a SxS, ATV or tailer) and knows the routine of the homeowner.
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Old 05-18-2022, 12:22 AM
 
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It's a great point about too many eyes watching for unfamiliar faces. I was speculating that it is easier for law enforcement to solve crimes because everyone knows everyone else, which prevents things from spinning out of control. But there are probably some other big reasons. Maybe because people know one another they keep each other in line, or maybe people get more support in their time of need or get more help watching their children etc. Would be interesting to see if there is research on that.
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Old 05-18-2022, 05:55 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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“When we arrived here in Cleveland, the Rizzos provided us with a house to live in, a vehicle to drive, cell phones; he pays all of our utilities, provides us with lunch while we are working, Wi-Fi at our home, gas for our vehicles, cable television, and healthcare services if we get sick,” John Retief says. “They also bought us three brand new recliners for our home and when we got here, our home was completely stocked with groceries. Then when we wanted a few things not here, he took us to the store and bought us what we needed until we got our first paycheck. It was more than we could have asked. Mr. Rizzo and his family, Mrs. Romona, Paul and Phil, are very gracious.”
That's outrageous! If farmers can afford to do all that for Afrikaaner farmhands, why don't they provide even a fraction of that for people entering the US illegally? or perhaps more to the point, why didn't they provide any of that, back in the days when American migrant workers travelled seasonally for farm work?
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Old 05-19-2022, 08:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
That's outrageous! If farmers can afford to do all that for Afrikaaner farmhands, why don't they provide even a fraction of that for people entering the US illegally? or perhaps more to the point, why didn't they provide any of that, back in the days when American migrant workers travelled seasonally for farm work?
Are you insinuating that because these young men are Afrikaners, they should be regarded as racist reactionaries? They grew up in post-apartheid South Africa. They aren’t living high on the hog.
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Old 05-22-2022, 09:12 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
That's outrageous! If farmers can afford to do all that for Afrikaaner farmhands, why don't they provide even a fraction of that for people entering the US illegally? or perhaps more to the point, why didn't they provide any of that, back in the days when American migrant workers travelled seasonally for farm work?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suesbal View Post
Are you insinuating that because these young men are Afrikaners, they should be regarded as racist reactionaries? They grew up in post-apartheid South Africa. They aren’t living high on the hog.
Well, you never got an answer from Ruth.
I couldn't figure out what she was saying either. But I am assuming the Afrikaners are here legally as temporary workers, which puts them in sort of a special status. I know if I invited workers to come and work of XX months I would make sure they had what they needed to be productive.


Some people DO provide services and housing for migrant workers, even today. Vardaman sweet potato workers are provided with basic services and housing. I don't know about elsewhere.
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Old 05-23-2022, 03:44 PM
 
Location: PNW, CPSouth, JacksonHole, Southampton
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[quote=Ruth4Truth;63459417]That's outrageous! If farmers can afford to do all that for Afrikaaner farmhands, why don't they provide even a fraction of that for people entering the US illegally? or perhaps more to the point, why didn't they provide any of that, back in the days when American migrant workers travelled seasonally for farm work?[/quote
[CENTER]

Because these "farmhands" are highly-competent men, who until recently, operated their own capital-intensive/infrastructure-intensive (and profitable) farms. These guys are experts at modern farming, from top-to-bottom. They're not exactly "farm hands". Back home, they're being robbed of their land, and systematically-murdered (and worse) with their families - the robbers/murderers being coached by a hostile foreign government on a different continent, whose kleptocrats plan on grabbing South Africa's farmland for themselves. I buy farmland, and understand the Kleptocrats' motivation, even as I loathe their methods.

Plenty farmers DO employ the undocumented workers you describe. They're more generous than you seem to realize. And historically, they HAVE BEEN more generous to migrant workers, than what the grievancemongers have led us to believe. The TV People don't give the public the whole story.

And Uncle Sam is VERY generous. Uncle Sam's various freebies constitute a sort of subsidy.

Being a farmer, today, is being an executive, a venture capitalist, a mechanic, a mixer of chemicals, and an operator of huge and incredibly-expensive farm machinery. You have to do all of that - all in anticipation of profit margins which are terrifyingly small. Generally, farmers have degrees in Agronomy or Business - or both. They work very long hours - virtually nonstop, when it's dry enough to plant, or when it's harvesting time. Those South Africans, having been modern farmers, themselves, are capable and willing to do all those tasks, if necessary. It's work that few CAN do and that few would be willing to do, even if they could.

Farmers learn their business from-toddlerhood-on - riding around in trucks with their daddies - fixing machinery with their daddies - enduring the heat and the dust and the mud and the sickening stench of the farm chemicals - all while needing to learn to know how to time selling the crop, and how to get a huge loan, then another huge loan, and another, when times are hard. Hard times can last for generations, by the way.

What sort of perks do you think I've given to key hires for my industry's hard-to-fill positions? Even our personal Laundress got a new Cadillac, when I lured her away from a household outside Seattle (and that was a hard one for me, since in my peculiar little mind, the theft of GM from its stockholders, ranks second to the Holocaust, and just above the Holomodor). But Magda can get my menfolk into their linen garden party trousers, wrinkle-free. And, as a student in the palaces of Saint Petersburg, she learned to care for the finest and most delicate fabrics - the sorts of fabrics which are not just for adorning our family's bodies, but also hanging as undercurtains between the overdrapery and the interior shutters and bomb curtains in our homes. You pay more, to get the best people for the most crucial roles.

But if all four of our homes were swept-away, and with them went the antique lace & applique panels from Sicilian palaces, the antique linen brocades, and the embroidered silk organza, our lives would not be ruined. For us, posterity would not be kaput. Contrast that, with what's at-stake for farmers. Babette's farmer grandfather told his best tractor driver, "don't burn the weeds by the bridge". So, naturally, those were the weeds that got burned - along with a big and very expensive wooden bridge belonging to an entity not friendly to farmers.

For Babette's family, that was the straw that broke the camel's back. Farm prices were not good. Prices had not been good, for years. The money-float operation her grandfather had been running, plotzed. The family's farms were lost, along with two of the local banks among which the grandfather had been floating money. Babette grew up in poverty, which is why she was at the cheap college for poor kids, where I met her. No deb cotillion for Babette. No Ole Miss, and no Chi Omega. Her family vacationed only in alternate years - and then only to "expose the children" (to art museums, Bloomingdale's, Neiman's, Saks, Henri Bendel, Lord & Taylor, Worth Avenue... They just looked. Sometimes, they could assemble enough shekels to visit a thrift store in Beverly Hills or Westchester or Palm Beach - to hunt merch like what they'd seen in the luxe stores. Every-other-year, they got one night in a fine hotel, and one meal in a fine restaurant - just so they'd know "how to do". Otherwise, their stately old Fleetwood pulled into campgrounds, and they ate tuna & crackers) The rest of the little group who took me under their collective wing, had similar stories: desperation and humiliation. Mississippi's labor had impoverished their families. We all clawed our way out of the gutter, together. We were the lucky few. But we all have cousins, though, who've sunken deeper and are forever lost. For MOST Mississippi farm families, things ended badly. They were ruined. Their futures were irreparably destroyed by farm disasters.

Those South Africans are the sort who PREVENT farm disasters.

There is no way to describe how miraculous it is, for farm owners, to be able to hire English-speaking, decent, ULTRA-competent guys, who can do EVERYTHING - and who can do it right. It's the difference between family futures stolen by bankruptcy, and families who have actual futures. If a laundress merits a Cadillac for excelling at something as trivial as making my schmatta better than other people's schmatta, then what does a competent farm manager/driver/mechanic/chemist merit? Those Afrikaners are a lot more than mere farm hands.

It's those Delta farmers' capital, their land, their LIVES, which they've invested in their farms. It's THEIR business whom they choose to offer incentives and even kindness. It's not our business. Are we volunteering to take those farmers' dying children for their leukemia treatments, year-after-year (those farm chemicals, ya know...)? Are we offering to find new careers for farmers who might bankrupt themselves by hiring the sort of people we think they should hire in the service of Social Justice, and by offering those people what we think would be nice to offer?
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