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Old 10-24-2013, 10:27 AM
 
322 posts, read 201,686 times
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I have friends from central KS and MO that lived in a medium sized city in Alabama for a few years, and they were pretty horrified at the social mores - particularly in regards to issues of race, religion, health, and sexual orientation - in a medium sized AL city!!! So while the urban rural divide is real, I also think if these friends came from fairly typical smallish MO/KS towns, there is also probably a real cultural difference between rural MO and the rural south even if both are conservative. Granted I've spent little time in the bootheel or extreme southern part of the state. But even on several trips to the south, and having lived in the twin cities, if there are degrees of difference between MO and MN, there are orders of magnitude between MO and the south - in my experience. The exception is probably the black populations in north STL and in east KC, that have stayed in a cultural cluster and remain southern in spite of their geography.
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Old 10-24-2013, 01:11 PM
 
247 posts, read 124,562 times
Reputation: 81
Just something that might be interesting to give an idea of the extreme differences between places I have lived. Here are some images.

Born here(Queens NYC)-father's side of the family
http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/expwy/lie/lieqbeb2.jpg

Grew up here(Upstate South Carolina)-mother's side of the family
Good view of the Blue Ridge Mountains in this image.
http://activerain.com/image_store/up...9779830221.jpg

Our Table Rock-Table Rock Mountain
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3294/3...1a28ea93_z.jpg
.

Last edited by senecaman; 10-24-2013 at 01:54 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 10-24-2013, 02:49 PM
 
247 posts, read 124,562 times
Reputation: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by senecaman View Post
Just something that might be interesting to give an idea of the extreme differences between places I have lived. Here are some images.

Born here(Queens NYC)-father's side of the family
http://www.angelfire.com/ny4/expwy/lie/lieqbeb2.jpg

Grew up here(Upstate South Carolina)-mother's side of the family
Good view of the Blue Ridge Mountains in this image.
http://activerain.com/image_store/up...9779830221.jpg

Our Table Rock-Table Rock Mountain
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3294/3...1a28ea93_z.jpg
.
The first image stopped working-not sure why. Here is another one.
Born here(Queens NYC)-father's side of the family.
Lol this Archie Bunker's and the King of Queens neighborhood.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._Rego_Park.jpg
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Old 10-24-2013, 04:16 PM
 
247 posts, read 124,562 times
Reputation: 81
Just having passed through the Missouri and being from SC I have always been a little curious how SC and Missouri are alike. I know one difference though .Was reading that at Missouri Tiger football games they sell bratwurst .At Clemson University games its more fried chicken and barbeque, although we do have one old German community in a town called Walhalla. They put on Oktoberfest each year and you can get brats there but the people have been here so long that even with German ancestry over time a lot of them became Southern Baptist instead of staying Lutheran.
Walhalla was founded by German settlers in 1849 who chose the Upstate because it was at the foot of the Blue Ridge(Appalachian) Mountains and reminded them of Bavaria. At one time the town had some small breweries in it but over time they closed. Now the town seems to be exploring its heritage again with craft beer events.
Some images of Walhalla SC and Oktoberfest.
http://gba-productions.smugmug.com/L..._SroKg-L-3.jpg

http://www.hmdb.org/Photos/45/Photo45283.jpg

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5123/5...658d5239_z.jpg

St Johns Lutheran Church
http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/p...m/17019640.jpg

Oktoberfest
http://images.acswebnetworks.com/201...estDancers.jpg

http://media.independentmail.com/med...37002_t607.JPG

Last edited by senecaman; 10-24-2013 at 05:25 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 10-24-2013, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Tennessee Delta
1,695 posts, read 1,300,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senecaman View Post
Just having passed through the Missouri and being from SC I have always been a little curious how SC and Missouri are alike. I know one difference though .Was reading that at Missouri Tiger football games they sell bratwurst .At Clemson University games its more fried chicken and barbeque, although we do have one old German community in a town called Walhalla. They put on Oktoberfest each year and you can get brats there but the people have been here so long that even with German ancestry over time a lot of them became Southern Baptist instead of staying Lutheran.
Walhalla was founded by German settlers in 1849 who chose the Upstate because it was at the foot of the Blue Ridge(Appalachian) Mountains and reminded them of Bavaria. At one time the town had some small breweries in it but over time they closed. Now the town seems to be exploring its heritage again with craft beer events.
Some images of Walhalla SC and Oktoberfest.
http://gba-productions.smugmug.com/L..._SroKg-L-3.jpg

http://www.hmdb.org/Photos/45/Photo45283.jpg

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5123/5...658d5239_z.jpg

St Johns Lutheran Church
http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/p...m/17019640.jpg

Oktoberfest
http://images.acswebnetworks.com/201...estDancers.jpg

http://media.independentmail.com/med...37002_t607.JPG
Interesting. There is German heritage in the south but it isn't nearly as widespread as in the midwest. Never been to a Mizzou game but I could see that being the case. I wouldn't think that Missouri and South Carolina have much in common really. There is a pretty significant Lutheran presence in my home county, along with Catholic, Baptist and Pentecostal.
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Old 10-24-2013, 06:40 PM
 
247 posts, read 124,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
Interesting. There is German heritage in the south but it isn't nearly as widespread as in the midwest. Never been to a Mizzou game but I could see that being the case. I wouldn't think that Missouri and South Carolina have much in common really. There is a pretty significant Lutheran presence in my home county, along with Catholic, Baptist and Pentecostal.
Yes a lot more German heritage in Missouri so that's a big difference between the South and the Midwest. But back in the day about 1988 I was working in a lumberyard in a nearby town. I worked with some down home, god fearing,huntin and fishin loving,4 wheel driven good ole boys .lol (good guys- all of them-very hardworking and very family oriented). Now if I plopped them down in Missouri I have a feeling they would feel mostly at home with all that wide open space, farmland, hunting and fishing. Now that doesn't make Missouri southern but I think there are many things people in rural areas have in common. I would guess those guys I worked with would feel pretty much at home in states like Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio (lots of people from Southern Appalachia in Ohio) and Pennsylvania, and I might throw in Upstate New York. Those ole boys loved their bucks(in season someone was always bringing venison jerky to work for everyone to try), filled their pickups with firewood they chopped and slaughtered "hawgs" to have ham for the winter. Something you have remember too, the South historically had 2 cultures, the lowland coastal South with large plantations(think Gone with the Wind) and the Upland South that was populated more with yeoman farmers (my mothers family) than rich landowners. Upstate SC along with Northern Georgia and Northern Alabama was more the Upland South than the Deep South. I would think that Upland South culture had some influence in Missouri.

Last edited by senecaman; 10-24-2013 at 07:21 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 10-24-2013, 06:53 PM
 
1,273 posts, read 935,569 times
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Well being raised in SW Missouri always had Sweet Tea, Grits, many kinds of Greens, Crawdads and Catfish, raised Tobacco, use Dogs to hunt everything most family very Clannish.

I've always considered my family Southern, ancestors had Slaves and fought for the Confederacy.

brushrunner
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:07 PM
 
449 posts, read 574,783 times
Reputation: 504
Quote:
Originally Posted by senecaman View Post
Now if I plopped them down in Missouri I have a feeling they would feel mostly at home with all that wide open space, farmland, hunting and fishing. Now that doesn't make Missouri southern but I think there are many things people in rural areas have in common. I would guess those guys I worked with would feel pretty much at home in states like Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio (lots of people from Southern Appalachia in Ohio) and Pennsylvania, and I might throw in Upstate New York.
I had a similar experience about 15 years ago - but with a retired farmer from Alsace! He carried himself, laughed, and acted just like pretty much any Dade county farmer of the same age. All he really needed was to learn the phrase, "doncha know."
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Old 10-24-2013, 07:36 PM
 
247 posts, read 124,562 times
Reputation: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by brushrunner View Post
Well being raised in SW Missouri always had Sweet Tea, Grits, many kinds of Greens, Crawdads and Catfish, raised Tobacco, use Dogs to hunt everything most family very Clannish.

I've always considered my family Southern, ancestors had Slaves and fought for the Confederacy.

brushrunner

Guess I was wrong but I always thought grits were very common throughout the corn belt. I had grits in Mount Vernon Illinois .And sweet tea don't get me started, seems like its only made good in the South. lol I worked some in New York and Pennsylvania and enjoyed my time there but real sweet tea wasn't to be found. Pizza yes , but that's another story(half Italian on my father's side).
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Old 10-24-2013, 08:24 PM
 
247 posts, read 124,562 times
Reputation: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrby View Post
I had a similar experience about 15 years ago - but with a retired farmer from Alsace! He carried himself, laughed, and acted just like pretty much any Dade county farmer of the same age. All he really needed was to learn the phrase, "doncha know."
It just seems like rural life is similar all over the country or least in the eastern and midwestern parts of the country. Its amazing but read some of the responses I got from people in Upstate New York in this thread about rural life and if it was similar to rural life in the south in some ways.
Curious about rural life in Western New York
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