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Old 10-20-2021, 05:25 PM
 
67 posts, read 95,090 times
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Hello. I currently live in central FL (suburb about 30 mins from Orlando). Really wanting to get out of here within the next year, 2 max. This place just isn't all it's cracked up to be... Been here on and off my whole life basically (on and off between upstate NY). Been back here for 5 yrs straight now, 26. I miss a small town kind of vibe, being around other like-minded people (this place is way too diverse. Too many transplants and too many different kinds of people from different backgrounds/places.) It totally lacks any sense of community. I want to live in an area where there are seasons although I don't miss the long, brutal winters of upstate NY (Syracuse area). A place that has affordable housing (housing market is insane here now). Any suggestions? I'm going to be driving up in like 2 weeks. I already have some places on my itinerary -- Republic, Nixa, Marshfield, Lebanon. couple others.
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Old 10-20-2021, 08:45 PM
 
Location: St. Louis City
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Well, I am not versed on what the update NY feel or vibe are, so I can only speak geographically. The terrain of Missouri south of I-70 and in particular on the eastern 2/ of the lower half of Missouri are going to be rolling hills with lots of trees. As you move westward, you get less trees and less hills. I think what you will also find are more traditional rural environments, fewer larger cities. Maybe also consider areas around Washington, MO. Aside from proximity to St. Louis it is also close to the Missouri wine country which is about to receive some significant investment. Maybe also consider the Farmington / Park Hills /Bonne Terre area which was one time was heavily mined. Again, this is also close to St. Louis, adjacent to the St. Francois Mountains and perhaps a little healthier that the deeper rural areas.

I grew up in northeast Missouri farming areas - very small towns and my suggestions are driven by the fact that I don't think you are looking for farming communities or those that have a southern feel about them. Those around Springfield are going to have elements of the bible belt, southern draw and not what I believe will be upstate NY. If you can define more, I might be able to help more.
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Old 10-22-2021, 12:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STLCityMike View Post
Well, I am not versed on what the update NY feel or vibe are, so I can only speak geographically. The terrain of Missouri south of I-70 and in particular on the eastern 2/ of the lower half of Missouri are going to be rolling hills with lots of trees. As you move westward, you get less trees and less hills. I think what you will also find are more traditional rural environments, fewer larger cities. Maybe also consider areas around Washington, MO. Aside from proximity to St. Louis it is also close to the Missouri wine country which is about to receive some significant investment. Maybe also consider the Farmington / Park Hills /Bonne Terre area which was one time was heavily mined. Again, this is also close to St. Louis, adjacent to the St. Francois Mountains and perhaps a little healthier that the deeper rural areas.

I grew up in northeast Missouri farming areas - very small towns and my suggestions are driven by the fact that I don't think you are looking for farming communities or those that have a southern feel about them. Those around Springfield are going to have elements of the bible belt, southern draw and not what I believe will be upstate NY. If you can define more, I might be able to help more.

Except if they have the accent they will stand out and might be a probably in some areas of Missouri, especially the southern half of Missouri.


Wouldn't those areas like Lebanon, Sikeston, Poplar bluff, Cabool, Caruthersville, etc view them as Yankees and outsiders?



Not trying to sound harsh but I can totally see that in southern Missouri that's more culturally the South.
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Old 10-23-2021, 12:10 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Upstate New York is a big place. You could be talking about rural Appalachian backwaters, liberal mountain towns, or big cities. Is there a certain culture you are looking for? That might help us.
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Old 10-23-2021, 07:18 AM
 
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Hey. The culture was like outdoors type people but not super redneck or your "stereotype" redneck like how you get in the south like in Florida. You know, the salt life, big lifted truck w/rap music (oddly enough lol...) blaring kind of "red neck". IDK what to even call these kinds of rednecks... Maybe like commercial/commercialized rednecks? lol.

These people in upstate NY they weren't southern per say but they weren't like stereotypical New Yorkers. They seemed to care about their family and their community. I'm kind of hippie but not like the college liberal type. I like our constitution, I like guns and fishing, kind of redneck I guess. I just like doing my own thing whenever I want and I don't like a lot of oversee from local or state gov.
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Old 10-23-2021, 10:41 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
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Pretend that the Missouri and Mississippi rivers are the Hudson River.

Starting along the river north of Cape Girardeau, instead of Dutch heritage you will have German and also French colonial heritage in Sainte Genevieve. The lead mining district is to the west. In St. Louis you will have a greater mix with Black and other ethnic influences. St. Louis has the largest Bosnian population outside of Bosnia. There is Irish and Czech mixed in. Think beer. Going north you will have a bit of old Missouri heading up to Hannibal (think Tom Sawyer). River towns and small farms there might seem like New England if you squint.

On the Missouri River, west of St. Louis you have St. Charles, old and a bit charming but a mixed bag. Going west you hit Germany or the Rhineland- German towns and wineries. This is also Daniel Boone country. Corncob pipes come from Washington. Hermann is very German and all about wine. There are a lot of little towns with wineries. That continues to Jefferson City, state Capital. Going west, still, you will run into the Civil War at Boonville and at Lexington. There are also more Germans and some Southerners. At Lexington, they can still point out the secesh houses or farms of old Confederate sympathizers. You eventually get to Independence (Harry Truman, OregonTrail), and Kansas City. North from there you have farm communities and St. Joseph of Pony Express came. This is also Jesse James country with some Mormon history thrown in. I think the river hills are some of the prettiest places in Missouri.
The KATY Trail is a bike path that runs 200 miles along the Missouri River. There is a spur that runs into Columbia and also one going to Jefferson City. There is a tremendous urban/rural divide in Missouri so that might seem like NY state as well.
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Old 10-23-2021, 06:35 PM
 
3,320 posts, read 2,442,409 times
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Pretend that the Missouri and Mississippi rivers are the Hudson River.

Starting along the river north of Cape Girardeau, instead of Dutch heritage you will have German and also French colonial heritage in Sainte Genevieve. The lead mining district is to the west. In St. Louis you will have a greater mix with Black and other ethnic influences. St. Louis has the largest Bosnian population outside of Bosnia. There is Irish and Czech mixed in. Think beer. Going north you will have a bit of old Missouri heading up to Hannibal (think Tom Sawyer). River towns and small farms there might seem like New England if you squint.

On the Missouri River, west of St. Louis you have St. Charles, old and a bit charming but a mixed bag. Going west you hit Germany or the Rhineland- German towns and wineries. This is also Daniel Boone country. Corncob pipes come from Washington. Hermann is very German and all about wine. There are a lot of little towns with wineries. That continues to Jefferson City, state Capital. Going west, still, you will run into the Civil War at Boonville and at Lexington. There are also more Germans and some Southerners. At Lexington, they can still point out the secesh houses or farms of old Confederate sympathizers. You eventually get to Independence (Harry Truman, OregonTrail), and Kansas City. North from there you have farm communities and St. Joseph of Pony Express came. This is also Jesse James country with some Mormon history thrown in. I think the river hills are some of the prettiest places in Missouri.
The KATY Trail is a bike path that runs 200 miles along the Missouri River. There is a spur that runs into Columbia and also one going to Jefferson City. There is a tremendous urban/rural divide in Missouri so that might seem like NY state as well.
I find even in central Missouri, Little Dixie area you will still find pockets that have pretty noticeable southern influences today despite being on the North side of the MO river.

I know most of us think South of the Missouri river in Missouri is where the southern culture in Missouri is, which is true but one would be surprised that influences can still be found in pockets in the northern half of MO.
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Old 10-24-2021, 12:05 AM
 
Location: The High Desert
14,536 posts, read 8,497,308 times
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Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
I find even in central Missouri, Little Dixie area you will still find pockets that have pretty noticeable southern influences today despite being on the North side of the MO river.

I know most of us think South of the Missouri river in Missouri is where the southern culture in Missouri is, which is true but one would be surprised that influences can still be found in pockets in the northern half of MO.
There are authentic "southern" communities and some that are contrived and "put on" as an affectation for tourism or some such reason. That can be applied to some of the German communities as well. Some towns, Fulton comes to mind, have a southern heritage and history. Hermann was a German "colony" with several outlier satellite villages in Gasconade County.
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Old 10-24-2021, 08:27 AM
 
3,320 posts, read 2,442,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
There are authentic "southern" communities and some that are contrived and "put on" as an affectation for tourism or some such reason. That can be applied to some of the German communities as well. Some towns, Fulton comes to mind, have a southern heritage and history. Hermann was a German "colony" with several outlier satellite villages in Gasconade County.
Well, overall Missouri is about 25 to 30 percent dixie, 25 percent transition zone. Transition zone is like south of the Missouri River until about 20 miles north of highway 60, then it becomes fully southern. Even dialect maps prove that.
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Old 10-24-2021, 02:09 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
14,536 posts, read 8,497,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
Well, overall Missouri is about 25 to 30 percent dixie, 25 percent transition zone. Transition zone is like south of the Missouri River until about 20 miles north of highway 60, then it becomes fully southern. Even dialect maps prove that.
Whatever.
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