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Old 06-12-2012, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,443 posts, read 17,681,375 times
Reputation: 15560

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
This is so true.



I used to think that Cape was more southern culturally than Jackson. (I even went to high school in Jackson and still felt that way) The past couple of years has started to reverse that opinion however. I guess what was going through my head was that maybe it was just a more rural culture and not necessarily a southern one. I've come to realize it's actually both compared to Cape.

I'm actually kind of suprised you said Jackson was southern. I do agree with you, I've just always been hesitant to come to that opinion 100%.


I agree that Cape and Sikeston aren't exactly alike, but if you compared Cape & Sikeston vs. Cape & Perryville, which is the same distance north of Cape, it makes Cape and Sikeston look pretty similar, especially demographically.
I cant really call Cape southern because of the outside influences, never could, and I lived there for 9 months, but Jackson has always read southern to me, its the first town that does so when heading south on I-55.
Ste Gen used to play them in football and basketball, I was always struck by how similar speech and attitudes were to PB when we went to games there.
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Old 06-14-2012, 01:06 AM
 
949 posts, read 777,522 times
Reputation: 619
Missouri is partially southern but it no way is it predominatly southern. It had more pro union supporters than pro confederate. Missouri is not entirely baptist either ( a defining trait of the south) with The st.louis and kansas city metropolitan area being mostly catholic. Missouri is really a mixture of Midwestern, Eastern, Southern and Western.

Missouri isnt even considered in the geographical region of the south and is often considered part of the midwest.

THREAD OVER
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Old 06-14-2012, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,713 posts, read 2,193,098 times
Reputation: 895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amercity View Post
Missouri is partially southern but it no way is it predominatly southern. It had more pro union supporters than pro confederate. Missouri is not entirely baptist either ( a defining trait of the south) with The st.louis and kansas city metropolitan area being mostly catholic. Missouri is really a mixture of Midwestern, Eastern, Southern and Western.

Missouri isnt even considered in the geographical region of the south and is often considered part of the midwest.

THREAD OVER
This is a simple analysis that really isn't true. Missouri is in no way western. As to partially southern, I don't agree there either...more like 25% southern. It is mostly a Midwest state today....baptists extend outside of the south as well into the southern Midwest (MO, KS, IL, IN). As far as eastern, no. It's Midwestern with southern influences when looked at as a whole state, with a bit of the state actually being truly southern.
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Old 03-03-2014, 07:32 PM
 
1 posts, read 512 times
Reputation: 10
I grew up in Advance (Stoddard County) in the 1940's and never considered myself anything except a Midwesterner.
Southern was Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia and I didn't consider Tennessee nor Kentucky Midwestern or Southern. I'm not sure what we thought they were, maybe a Border State.
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Old 03-05-2014, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Little Rock, Arkansas
19 posts, read 11,769 times
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To me, Missouri is only 25% southern (regions of Bootheel and Ozarks).

During the harvesting seasons as a child, my parents and I would live in rural Bootheel temporarily while Dad worked operating a big tractor to collect crops for large farms. We lived in several places, such as Kennett, Portageville, Sikeston, and Scott City. That part is definitely southern like Arkansas Delta so does Springfield.

Kansas City, Columbia, and St. Louis are solidly Midwestern while Cape Girardeau is kinda like the transition zone.
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Old 03-05-2014, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Tennessee Delta
1,703 posts, read 1,352,915 times
Reputation: 885
Quote:
Originally Posted by RazorbacksWPS View Post
To me, Missouri is only 25% southern (regions of Bootheel and Ozarks).

During the harvesting seasons as a child, my parents and I would live in rural Bootheel temporarily while Dad worked operating a big tractor to collect crops for large farms. We lived in several places, such as Kennett, Portageville, Sikeston, and Scott City. That part is definitely southern like Arkansas Delta so does Springfield.

Kansas City, Columbia, and St. Louis are solidly Midwestern while Cape Girardeau is kinda like the transition zone.
I agree with this. Nice username by the way.
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Old 03-06-2014, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Columbia MO
736 posts, read 936,312 times
Reputation: 1026
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
Missouri is in no way western.
I'll only disagree as to Kansas City, which not only has a strong western heritage from its days as the terminus of many of the great cattle drives, but that heritage stays alive with the American Royal. There's also a lot more western wear available there than anywhere else in Missouri, by far-- not only the chains out of Texas (or at least that's where I know them from) like Shepler's and Cavender's, but a nice little independent store, Nigro's.
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Old 03-07-2014, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MO
3,419 posts, read 2,864,616 times
Reputation: 2266
^And this place, just east of town: Kleinschmidts Western Store | Over 19,000 Pairs of Boots

Unfortunately, some in Kansas City have done everything they can to forget and leave behind our Western heritage. That, as well as a summation of Kansas City's Western heritage, can be read in the article I posted here: Beef's Raw Edges - The rise and fall of KC's meatpacking industry
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Old 03-08-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Columbia MO
736 posts, read 936,312 times
Reputation: 1026
I like Kleinschmidt's, too. Of course, I make it sound like I buy a lot of boots and western wear when I don't, not any more, anyway. I figure the *real* Luccheses I got 25 years ago (in kangaroo, best shoe leather in the world) will see me through until I die. I think a St; Louisan's proclamation that "Missouri has no western influence" is just as valid as a Bootheeler's proclamation that "Missouri is southern." Each has hold of his particular part of the elephant.

I don't think there's much question that, going west from the Missouri border, the west (mythical and real) truly starts in Kansas (I mean, Dodge City, come on) and it just gets westerner on the way to Colorado.

Thanks for the article.
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Old 03-08-2014, 06:44 PM
Status: "That 80s Sound, ZTT Records!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,323 posts, read 21,192,114 times
Reputation: 7728
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyrano View Post
I like Kleinschmidt's, too. Of course, I make it sound like I buy a lot of boots and western wear when I don't, not any more, anyway. I figure the *real* Luccheses I got 25 years ago (in kangaroo, best shoe leather in the world) will see me through until I die. I think a St; Louisan's proclamation that "Missouri has no western influence" is just as valid as a Bootheeler's proclamation that "Missouri is southern." Each has hold of his particular part of the elephant.

I don't think there's much question that, going west from the Missouri border, the west (mythical and real) truly starts in Kansas (I mean, Dodge City, come on) and it just gets westerner on the way to Colorado.

Thanks for the article.
The semi-arid West, or areas that are far more marginal agriculturally, are along and west of 100 degrees latitude before the prominent agricultural valleys of the inland West removed from the coast.
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