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Old 09-02-2017, 08:23 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
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Kansas City Journal November 14, 1899

A MISSOURIAN'S REVENGE

Caruthersville, Mo., Nov. 13---News reaches us here of a distressing tragedy at a levee camp, below here. Charles Pearman, who had for some reason become angry with a family named Poe, came to Poe's tent with a double-barreled shotgun and fired both barrels into the tent, striking and dangerously wounding seven of the family of nine. One small child was killed instantly, one has since died and the mother is not expected to live. Pearman escaped across the Mississippi and took refuge in the Tennessee forests. A posse followed and captured him and he is now in jail here. Pearman is about 21 years old.




St. Louis Republic January 2, 1906

CAN OF BEER CAUSES FIGHT

Blood was spilled last night over the price of a can of beer. Henry Steinanj, age 23, residing at 214 Lafayette avenue, was stabbed in the left arm and left side. It is charged, by J. Pintar of 1801 South Second street, last night in front of Pintar's house. Pintar was hit on the head with a lump of coal and sustained a scalp wound. Neither injuries are serious. Pintar was locked up at the Third District Police Station on a charge of assault to kill and Steinanj was taken to City Hospital.




Bumbling Thieves Stole 88 Year Old's Wheelchair Ramp

https://www.riverfronttimes.com/news...amp-police-say
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:14 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
Kansas City Daily Journal January 5, 1895

A BOLD ROBBERY

A bold robbery was perpetrated last night about 9:45 o'clock at Munger's Laundry at 12th street and Lydia avenue. Oscar B. Shaw, bookkeeper for the laundry, was posting up his books behind locked doors in the laundry office, when a man rapped at the front door and asked for a bundle of laundry. He did not give his name and Shaw did not know him, but, thinking it all right, he admitted him to the office. No sooner had he done so, according to Shaw's story, the stranger pointed a revolver at his face and backed him into a rear room. Then another man entered and rifled the safe while the first man kept Shaw covered with the revolver and threatened to kill him if he made a sound.
When the robbers had gone with the booty, believed to be about $100, Shaw went to the telephone and notified the police. The officer in charge at police headquarters informed Precinct no.4 and policemen were at once sent from that station to the scene of the robbery. No trace could be found of the thieves. Shaw gave police a description of both men and said he would know them if he saw them again.




Weird Crimes Around St. Louis






https://patch.com/missouri/wentzvill...otgun-fb86cad0
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Old 09-02-2017, 11:03 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
Kansas City Journal January 2, 1895

CIGARS AND LIQUORS STOLEN

Phillip Gerson, a saloon keeper at 1711 West Ninth street, reported to the police yesterday that early in the morning he went to sleep in the saloon, leaving 3 men playing cards. When he awoke, the saloon was deserted, and a large quantity of cigars and liquors had been stolen. There was $100 concealed under the covering of the back bar that the thieves did not find. The cash drawer had a catch-lock that could not be opened without using violence.




Kansas City Journal January 2, 1895

BURGLARS BAFFLED

Thieves tried to break into the safe at George M. Foley's tobacco house at 413 West Fifth street early yesterday morning before daybreak. They were evidently frightened away before getting their work fairly underway. They succeeded in getting about $10 from a money drawer in the office desk.
There was about $600 and a large quantity of valuable papers in the safe. When the building was opened yesterday morning, after the robbers had left, the signs of an attempted safe blowing were abundant, even to the old rags heaped against the safe to muffle the sound of the blast to be used in bursting the safe open.





Kansas City Journal March 1, 1897

SO MUCH FOR REPUTATION

John Rayle, a known thief, clubbed and locked up for being near where robbers worked.

When officer McNamara passed Conrad Spell's saloon at 311 Independence avenue, at 3:30 yesterday morning, three men were seen to leave it and run away in different directions. The officer followed the men, but was unable to overtake any of them. He returned and awakened Mr. Spell, who, after a hasty examination, found he had been robbed of $50 worth of cigars and liquors. Officer McNamara afterwards found John Rayle, a well known local, lurking near the saloon and arrested him. Rayle resisted and the officer used his club, inflicting several scalp wounds on the young thief before he would submit to be taken to the police station. His wounds were dressed by Surgeon Landon. He denies all knowledge of the robbery.
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Old 09-03-2017, 07:01 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
Kansas City Journal February 14, 1897

ROBBED LEGISLATORS

Jefferson City, Mo., Feb 13---James F. Jones, of Springfield, Mo., who was engrossing clerk of the House in 1891, and is said to be a prominent Democratic politician of Springfield, is in jail in this city for theft. Every day during the past week guests of the City Hotel have missed some of their personal effects from their rooms. Yesterday the chief of police was notified of the thefts. This morning the chief arrested Jones while he was in the act of rifling a trunk belonging to Senator Miller, of Worth County, in one of the rooms at the hotel.
In a grip belonging to Jones were found several articles owned by other guests at the hotel. He was arraigned in police court and bound over for examination on Monday. He was unable to give $500 bail, so he was committed to jail.




Kansas City Journal January 2, 1895

FRANK JAMES' GOOD SENSE

Fort Worth, Tex., Jan 1---One of Sanger Bros. employees has just returned from St. Louis, where he met his old friend, Frank James. On speaking of the talk that he will appear in a sensational train robbery melo-drama, Frank James says, " Tell the people that Frank James is not a wild man. Tell them that he has too much respect for himself and for them to insult their intelligence by going on the stage in the role of a train robber. "
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:07 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
St. Louis Republic December 27, 1905

ROBBERS WRECK POST-OFFICE AND SAFE CRYSTAL CITY

Entering the post-office at Crystal City, Mo., through a window, at 12:30 this morning, two unidentified robbers blew the safe with a heavy charge of dynamite, which wrecked the establishment. They escaped with a small amount of money. A boy was sleeping in the store at the time. A watchman in a newly finished hotel, attracted by the noise, ran out of the building and was shot in the leg by one of the robbers.
Although Sheriff Hensler of Hillsboro was immediately notified, the men got away, and an imperfect description is furnished to the authorities of those who perpetrated the robbery. The boy in the store, Fred Harter, was stunned by the explosion and could give only a faint account of what happened.
The post-office at Crystal City is located in the Kaufman dry goods establishment and occupies the rear part of the store. Receipts of the day are placed in the safe which is behind the counter, and the boy who sleeps in the store, has a bed near the safe. It is known that the robbers effected their entrance through a window, as a sash was found to be raised when an examination was made. The quiet fashion in which they attained their entrance leads the police of Crystal City and Festus to the belief that they were professionals at the business.

EXPLOSION WAS TERRIFIC

Once inside, a charge of dynamite was placed under the safe, and a charge of some substance, presumably nitroglycerin, was inserted beneath the door. The explosion was terrific, aroused the town, and not only blew open the door of the strong box, but also wrecked the entire store. Bottles, dry goods and groceries were strewn about the floor, and the boy, who was sleeping within, narrowly escaped with his life. Before he could recover from his confusion, the robbers hastily grabbed up what money was in sight, darted through the window and escaped.
Next door to the store a new hotel is being erected. A night watchman sleeping in the place was aroused and hurried to the sidewalk just as the men emerged. He called to them to halt and received a reply in the shape of a bullet, which struck him in the right leg and prostrated him to the sidewalk.
The men then hurried south along Main street, and were last seen at the southern portion of the town.
Crystal City is but one mile from Festus, Mo., and a telephone message was sent there for help. A telegram was also sent to St. Louis asking Night Chief Gillespy to look out for the men. As the boy's description shows that both of them were masked, the local force has little to go on.
The district around Crystal City and Festus is broken and consists of hills and timbered stretches, and it is believed that the men are concealed somewhere in the neighborhood.
Sheriff Hensler intends to procure hounds early this morning and attempt to track the men. The watchman who was shot is not believed to be seriously hurt. So far as is known they had no vehicle awaiting them, as no tracks can be found which would lead to this belief. The heavy charge of explosive aroused the entire town of Crystal City, and the population was up in arms when the dispatch arrived.


" Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?"
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:11 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
St. Louis Republic December 29, 1905

TWO SHOTS AT A BURGLAR

Charles Hagerding, a tailor, on Chouteau avenue, fired two shots at a burglar about 9 o'clock last night. Hagerding was attracted to the outside of his house by a noise and discovered the burglar prying open a shutter. He returned to his room and got his revolver. The burglar was leaping over a back fence when Hagerding fired at him.




The New Haven Leader (Franklin County, Mo) August 2, 1912

ONE MAN TERRORIZES TOWN

Springfield, Mo.,--After creating a reign of terror and evading police, David Daniels, 25 years old, was captured by C.H. Kimberling, from whom he had stolen a suit of clothes. Daniels was twice sent to the reform school, and at another time arrested for theft. He said he is a deserter from the army.



The New Haven Leader (Franklin County, Mo) August 2, 1912

LOCKS UP WOMEN TAKES JEWELS

Kansas City, Mo.,--For 40 minutes Mrs. P.C. McCarthy and her two daughters were locked in a bathroom of their home here, afraid to call for help because a daylight burglar had threatened to kill them.
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:49 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
St. Louis Republic December 16, 1905

YOUTHFUL PURSE SNATCHER GETS BUT LITTLE BOOTY

Mrs. Nellie Carroll of 4441 Evans avenue was the victim of a youthful purse snatcher last night about 7 o'clock. She was on her way home walking north on the west side of Taylor avenue, between Cook avenue and Page boulevard. A white man darted out from an alley and snatched from her arm a handbag. It contained 35 cents in money, a card case, a pair of gold eyeglasses, a pair of small scissors and a pearl-handled knife. The thief ran in the alley and escaped. The police of the tenth district were notified.





St. Louis Republic December 4, 1905

THIEVES OVERLOOK VALUABLE PLUNDER

Overlooking a set of diamond jewelry valued at $1,000, which was in the top drawer of a bureau, thieves ransacked the house of Edwin S. Gempp at 2106 south Grand avenue last evening, stealing property valued at $300, one of the largest thefts reported from households this season.
Effecting an entrance by breaking open a kitchen window and also, in another attempt, breaking the lock on a side basement door, the burglars invaded the premises some time between 7 and 8 pm, and took property of various descriptions. Included in their plunder were two seal-skin muffs, valued at $100, a pearl chain, pearl opera glasses, cut-glass dish, a carving set and miscellaneous articles of other sorts. It is believed that the invaders must have been frightened away, as the mixed character of the goods they took indicated that any kind of salable articles were acceptable to them. The entire family was out at the time, but the burglary was discovered as soon as they returned. A list of the goods was given to the police. Mr. Gempp is a liquor dealer of the city.
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Old 09-04-2017, 11:11 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
Kansas City Journal March 1, 1897

IDENTIFIED AS THE " DENVER KID "

Sedalia, Mo., Feb 28-- George Miller, who with Pat Clancy, the noted safe blower and diamond thief, is serving a jail sentence for robbing John Steelman in this city on the 17th, has been fully identified by Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago detectives as the " Denver Kid," alias J.N. Kellogg, one of the most expert pickpockets in the country.




Kansas City Journal February 26, 1897

FOR PASSING BOGUS MONEY

Sedalia, Mo., Feb 25---Addison Cook, colored, who was associated with John Faulkner in passing counterfeit dollars in this city and who disappeared when Faulkner was arrested, was apprehended today at Pleasant Green by Deputy United States Marshal Johnson. Cook was taken to Clinton tonight and will be arraigned before Commissioner Jeffreys on Tuesday.




Kansas city Journal February 25, 1897

TORTURED BY ROBBERS

St. Joseph, Mo., Feb 24---The entire territory surrounding Avenue City has been traversed today by posses searching for four robbers who assaulted Vernon Harris, a hermit, near Avenue City, who was supposed to keep much money concealed about the premises. The robbers are undoubtedly the same men who robbed and murdered Alfred H Wilson in that vicinity four months ago.
No trace was ever secured of Wilson's murderers, although a reward has been offered and several good detectives have been at work on the case.
A considerable sum of money was secured from Wilson. Vernon Harris was awakened yesterday morning by the robbers, who had gained entrance to his home and demanded his money. Harris protested he had none, but was bound and tortured by the fiends. The only thing that saved his life was the approach of two neighbors who came to buy some chickens. The robbers fled after securing $80 in cash.
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Old 09-05-2017, 07:26 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
The Holt County Sentinel September 16, 1921

GOT HIS MAN

One man missed the "fun" when the lone bandit was captured in his attempted holdup of the Burlington train, no.16, near Parkville, Mo., Saturday, September 10.
All of the thrills of an old fashioned holdup were experienced. The strategy of the train crew foiled the lone bandit, who was captured after being administered a severe beating by W.H. McGee, conductor from Kansas City. Two confederates were believed to have jumped from the rear observation platform, when the lights on the train were cut off. A high powered motor boat shortly after was seen to dash out into the Missouri river. The bandit assisted he attempted the holdup alone. He gave his name as Harry Burton and was taken to the Platte County jail.



ST. LOUIS RESIDENT SHOOTS ARMED BURGLAR

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-sta...-armed-burglar
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Old 09-05-2017, 08:14 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo, where the woodbine twineth
9,437 posts, read 7,526,323 times
Reputation: 14259
The Holt County Sentinel (Oregon, Mo) September 23, 1921

POST OFFICE ROBBED

The Craig post office was robbed sometime last Friday morning, September 9. Entrance was gained through the front door. A hole was cut in the back door screen but the back door is securely fastened and bolted. An old style blacksmith hammer was found beside the safe. The knob on the safe was knocked off and the safe opened. It was not announced what the loss would be but an inspector has been on the job the past two days and some disclosures may be made in the near future.
The Craig post office seems to be a favorite stopping place for the traveling cracksmen. The following is the record of Craig post office robberies:

The first robbery of the Craig office took place November 8, 1875 while H.S. Hogue was the postmaster. Only a small amount of loot was secured, which consisted of a small amount of stamps and $6.00 in money.

While L.L Teare was postmaster, the cracksman visited the post office without any formal invitation on the night of March 16, 1894, and secured $300. Homer Reed was found to be the thief, and in October, 1895, was given 2 years in the penitentiary.

On January 7, 1906, while Phil Thompson was the postmaster, the office was robbed of $246.

On January 16, 1908, while Mr. Thompson was in charge of the office, a man representing himself as a post office inspector, giving the name of Orland, confidence the postmaster out of the post office funds amounting to $660. A man named A.J. Moore was arrested for the offense, but proving a complete alibi, he was acquitted.

On Sunday, October 15, 1916, W.H. Hambaugh, postmaster, the office safe was blown, and the loot amounted to $503 in stamps, $6.00 in pennies, and a small amount of cash from the Sunday's postal sales.

Friday night, September 9, 1921, postmaster W.H. Hambaugh found the post office had been robbed. The amount had not been given out.
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