U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Missouri
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 09:38 AM
 
Location: MO Ozarkian in NE Hoosierana
4,679 posts, read 7,192,995 times
Reputation: 6715
lol, I wonder just what this thread would/could have looked like, oh say, ~100-150 years ago...
"NEWS: Durn Transplants from KY, IN, TN, and VI are Ruining Our Beloved State!!! "

[of course, lets not go back further when the Osage and other tribes were cursing on their interdrumnets about the new white folks... ]

Anyhow, few other points: (a) I for one [even tho' not currently inhabiting in my beloved Ozarks ] am glad that the pop growth is not that high; growth just for the sake of growth IMHO is NOT desirable; (b) the country-hillbilly boy part of me loves the wild open spaces, lack of other humans [no offense ya'll ] when trekking over hills and through hollers, while the citified part of me enjoys the shopping, entertainment, restaurants of the paved concrete junglescapes, so,,, 'tis good to have an ample mix of both; and lastly (c) we all came from some other place(s), ain't none of a true 'native' of Missouri - its all relative as to how long our ancestors or even some as first-gens have taken 'roots' in MO, but would harken to say that I highly doubt that any of us perusing this forum have blood that has been here longer than 3-4 generations... not counting any Native blood.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Unread 01-17-2009, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Peoples Republic of Cali
9,171 posts, read 4,161,653 times
Reputation: 4942
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowCaver View Post
lol, I highly doubt that any of us perusing this forum have blood that has been here longer than 3-4 generations... not counting any Native blood.
I was able to track my mother family back to a ship, that left Derbyshire, England in 1690, bound for Virginia..My Maternal Grandmother was born in Missouri (Broseley) in 1899....
Tracked Father's side to 1840's Kentucky then lost the trail...
I do know they moved from Greenway Ar. to Broseley Mo in the 30's though...
Dad went to the Pacific in WWII came home after the war, married my Mom and moved to Richmond, Ca in 1949..........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 10:57 AM
 
1,290 posts, read 1,615,608 times
Reputation: 1261
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowCaver View Post
I highly doubt that any of us perusing this forum have blood that has been here longer than 3-4 generations... not counting any Native blood.
I have made it back 5 generations on my mom/grandmother's side all in MO. From there it leads to TN.

On my dad's side my aunt has taken it back 8 generations but not all in MO. The family started in VA and migrated west. I have one ancestor who traveled the Oregon trail from MO to OR in 1852. His story, and I have it, is impressive, it took him 6 months to get to OR from MO. Can you imagine what he saw on his journey...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,453 posts, read 15,782,710 times
Reputation: 15560
wow........ I feel like folks are gonna look at me like one of those Floraduh nutz when I can finally make home from exile here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Rolla, Phelps County, Ozarks, Missouri
1,008 posts, read 1,375,118 times
Reputation: 992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lake Junkie View Post
Lots of misconceptions here.

First, you're assuming that since I am a realtor, I am happy to mis-lead people and only looking out for myself. I'm sorry if some realtors are like that, but that's a broad brush you're painting with, my friend!
Go back and do some rereading. I didn't question your ethics at all. I never said you misled anyone, and I don't know why I had to get a reprimand from Shadow Caver accusing me of lacking civility. I said that you, as a realtor, help to increase taxes. Here's how:

Let's say that in 1990 I buy 10 acres of Ozarks land at $200 per acre. That's $2,000 total. Let's assume I do nothing with the property, but I want to sell it in 1991. Along comes a Realtor with a Californian in tow, flush with cash and amazed at how cheap land is. I agree to sell the property for $250 per acre. So the Californio pays $2,500 for my 10 acres.

Then something happens and the Californian decides to go to Texas instead, so he tells the Realtor to sell the 10 acres for $300 per acre. A couple from Florida buys it in 1992, paying $3,000 total, sight unseen. When they arrive to look at it, the woman discovers there is not a shopping mall nearby, so she insists on selling the 10 acres and moving instead to St. Louis, a city that wants to have an Eastern sophistication. They want a profit, so they also tack on $50 per acre, selling the property in 1993 for $350 per acre, or a total of $3,500.

In 1994, the new owners, a couple from Washington, also decide not to build on the property because the nearest town, with a population of 1,800 doesn't have a Starbucks. You can buy a cup of coffee at the convenience store and mix in some flavoring, but that's just not the same. They sell the land for just $50 per acre over what they paid for it, so they receive a total of $4,000, from a businessman in St. Louis who wants to use the land for drinking with his buddies while deer hunting.

A year after the St. Louis businessman buys the property, he is involved in a crash with an old couple on their way to see their grandkids. The old couple dies, and the St. Louis businessman must sell the property to pay attorney fees for the charge of manslaughter he is facing. Again, he tacks on just $50 per acre, selling it for $450 per acre. He receives $4,500 from an architect in New York who wants to move to the Ozarks and help preserve old houses.

Recapping, I bought the land in 1990 for $2,000. The Californio buys it in 1991 for $2,500. The Florida couple buys it in 1992 for $3,000. The Washingtonians buy it in 1993 for $3,500. The St. Louis businessman pays $4,000 in 1994. The New York architect buys it in 1994 for $4,500.

In 1995, a couple from Massachusetts, looking to retire, buys the property for $5,000. They decide to sell it after they find out that it isn't close to Branson after all.

In 1996, a couple who grew up in the Ozarks but went to Chicago after college, buys the property for $5,500. They discover that it isn't close enough to floatable stream, so they sell it.

The buyer in 1997, who paid $6,000 total, is another Californian who says "What this place needs..." or "Back in California ... " or "Why don't you people ... " so many times while visiting his property that the locals finally start running away every time they see him. He gets mad and decides to sell.

He sells to a vegetarian, anti-gun couple in 1998. They pay $6,500 for the 10 acres, but they're aghast to find that neighbors own guns, shoot animals and EAT them.

They sell the property online for $7,000 in 1999 to a couple from New York City wanting to live the simple life in a community where there are band concerts at the gazebo every night, barbershop quartets singing on street corners every noon and a carnival on the public square all through the summer.

While visiting the town in the summer of 2000, the couple learns that the nearest community is a town of 1900 people. It is not the county seat, does not have a public square and doesn't have a town band. It doesn't even have a barbershop, much less a barbershop quartet. All that's in the town is a gas station, a hardware store, a feed store, a beauty parlor, two liquor stores, eight churches, four of them non-denominational tongue-speaking congregations, and little grocery store that sells its merchandise four 25 percent more than the Wal-Mart Supercenter 35 miles away but has a fantastic meat counter. That's just not enough so the couple sells the property for $7,500.

From 1990 until 2000, the land has grown in value from $200 an acre to $750 per acre, even though no improvements have been made. Now, yes, this is fiction, but the reality is even more striking. In the Ozarks, land has gone from $200 to $2,000 an acre, thanks to higher demand.

Property taxes are paid on the $100 of assessed valuation, which is about one-third of the appraisal, so if property values go up rapidly, so do property taxes.

It isn't all the fault of Californians. People are coming from other states, too; and they're coming from cities within the state.

Not everyone is complaining. Rolla is one city that is actively seeking outsiders. The chamber and the city have an active campaign to bring in more chain stores. There's a program to sprawl to the west along the interstate in hopes of generating more sales taxes.

Maybe it's all a good thing. Maybe it means increased prosperity for everyone, better education for our children, better care for old people like me.

Maybe I'm just negative, but I deny being uncivil and, although you feel insulted, I do not apologize.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Silver Springs, FL
23,453 posts, read 15,782,710 times
Reputation: 15560
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarksboy View Post
Go back and do some rereading. I didn't question your ethics at all. I never said you misled anyone, and I don't know why I had to get a reprimand from Shadow Caver accusing me of lacking civility. I said that you, as a realtor, help to increase taxes. Here's how:

Let's say that in 1990 I buy 10 acres of Ozarks land at $200 per acre. That's $2,000 total. Let's assume I do nothing with the property, but I want to sell it in 1991. Along comes a Realtor with a Californian in tow, flush with cash and amazed at how cheap land is. I agree to sell the property for $250 per acre. So the Californio pays $2,500 for my 10 acres.

Then something happens and the Californian decides to go to Texas instead, so he tells the Realtor to sell the 10 acres for $300 per acre. A couple from Florida buys it in 1992, paying $3,000 total, sight unseen. When they arrive to look at it, the woman discovers there is not a shopping mall nearby, so she insists on selling the 10 acres and moving instead to St. Louis, a city that wants to have an Eastern sophistication. They want a profit, so they also tack on $50 per acre, selling the property in 1993 for $350 per acre, or a total of $3,500.

In 1994, the new owners, a couple from Washington, also decide not to build on the property because the nearest town, with a population of 1,800 doesn't have a Starbucks. You can buy a cup of coffee at the convenience store and mix in some flavoring, but that's just not the same. They sell the land for just $50 per acre over what they paid for it, so they receive a total of $4,000, from a businessman in St. Louis who wants to use the land for drinking with his buddies while deer hunting.

A year after the St. Louis businessman buys the property, he is involved in a crash with an old couple on their way to see their grandkids. The old couple dies, and the St. Louis businessman must sell the property to pay attorney fees for the charge of manslaughter he is facing. Again, he tacks on just $50 per acre, selling it for $450 per acre. He receives $4,500 from an architect in New York who wants to move to the Ozarks and help preserve old houses.

Recapping, I bought the land in 1990 for $2,000. The Californio buys it in 1991 for $2,500. The Florida couple buys it in 1992 for $3,000. The Washingtonians buy it in 1993 for $3,500. The St. Louis businessman pays $4,000 in 1994. The New York architect buys it in 1994 for $4,500.

In 1995, a couple from Massachusetts, looking to retire, buys the property for $5,000. They decide to sell it after they find out that it isn't close to Branson after all.

In 1996, a couple who grew up in the Ozarks but went to Chicago after college, buys the property for $5,500. They discover that it isn't close enough to floatable stream, so they sell it.

The buyer in 1997, who paid $6,000 total, is another Californian who says "What this place needs..." or "Back in California ... " or "Why don't you people ... " so many times while visiting his property that the locals finally start running away every time they see him. He gets mad and decides to sell.

He sells to a vegetarian, anti-gun couple in 1998. They pay $6,500 for the 10 acres, but they're aghast to find that neighbors own guns, shoot animals and EAT them.

They sell the property online for $7,000 in 1999 to a couple from New York City wanting to live the simple life in a community where there are band concerts at the gazebo every night, barbershop quartets singing on street corners every noon and a carnival on the public square all through the summer.

While visiting the town in the summer of 2000, the couple learns that the nearest community is a town of 1900 people. It is not the county seat, does not have a public square and doesn't have a town band. It doesn't even have a barbershop, much less a barbershop quartet. All that's in the town is a gas station, a hardware store, a feed store, a beauty parlor, two liquor stores, eight churches, four of them non-denominational tongue-speaking congregations, and little grocery store that sells its merchandise four 25 percent more than the Wal-Mart Supercenter 35 miles away but has a fantastic meat counter. That's just not enough so the couple sells the property for $7,500.

From 1990 until 2000, the land has grown in value from $200 an acre to $750 per acre, even though no improvements have been made. Now, yes, this is fiction, but the reality is even more striking. In the Ozarks, land has gone from $200 to $2,000 an acre, thanks to higher demand.

Property taxes are paid on the $100 of assessed valuation, which is about one-third of the appraisal, so if property values go up rapidly, so do property taxes.

It isn't all the fault of Californians. People are coming from other states, too; and they're coming from cities within the state.

Not everyone is complaining. Rolla is one city that is actively seeking outsiders. The chamber and the city have an active campaign to bring in more chain stores. There's a program to sprawl to the west along the interstate in hopes of generating more sales taxes.

Maybe it's all a good thing. Maybe it means increased prosperity for everyone, better education for our children, better care for old people like me.

Maybe I'm just negative, but I deny being uncivil and, although you feel insulted, I do not apologize.
hhhmmmmmm, it says in your profile you are straight and intolerant. If ever I saw a Freudian slip......
You managed to belittle every out-of-stater in the area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,473 posts, read 3,415,917 times
Reputation: 1476
Default Three things you can't stop: death, taxes and progress

Ode to a Good Ol boy

He loves Missouri,
with all his heart.

He's a self-proclaimed,
grouchy old fart.

He's got lot's of advice
and none of it's nice.

Newcomers beware,
Ain't no Mayberry there.

New ideas are all dumb,
Missouri rule of thumb.

Stay in the state where you are
You'll be better, by far.

But old fart, listen here,
we'll be moving, some year.

From all over the USA
We'll be coming some day.

We are Americans, you know
and don't need your say so.

Some come to go fishing,
and don't need your permission

Some come out to farm,
will do the locals no harm.

Your jive, it grows old
Time to break out of that mold

We're coming, you see,
We live in the land of the free.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Still in the same spot...
2,125 posts, read 2,773,538 times
Reputation: 1502
Ozarksboy, I hope you hear me out on this post...

I was born and raised in the St. Louis area. I moved to the north San Francisco Bay Area in 1986. A couple of memories that stick in my head to this day: A number of cars (most of them imports, of course) with bumper stickers saying "Welcome to California. Now Go Home." We were driving in town one afternoon and came to a very busy intersection, with two sets of double-left hand turn lanes. When the left turn signal turned green, we started into the intersection, and it looked for all the world like we were going to get hit head-on by the first car turning left in the opposite direction. So my mom hit the brakes, and some guy right behind us, seeing our Missouri license plate, screamed, "WHY DONTCHA GO BACK TO MISSOURI?????!!!!!!"

At least we didn't get hit head on. But I remember that incident over 22 years ago like it was just this past week.

So....a couple of examples of 1986 California and why I don't ever want to see Missouri resemble California in any way, shape, matter or form.

And are you not concerned that Missouri might lose a congressional seat, making it even less influential when it comes to national politics? Would you rather see that seat get picked up by California? Nancy Pelosi? Jerry Brown? Barbara Boxer? The "Governator?" Take a look at my sig line. California is about to run out of cash. It is so broke that it doesn't look like we're going to receive our state tax refunds on time. We're getting IOUs instead.

Give Lake Junkie, an ex-Californian, and I some credit; we could see this happening from a thousand miles away. I'm going to keep hammering this message to anyone who will listen--We do not wish to Californicate Missouri if and when my better half and I are so privileged to sell our place and get moved back there. Of course, passing a $5 billion state bond measure to build a high-speed commuter rail line from Kansas City to St. Louis sounds pretty jim-dandy***, don't you think?! Juuuuuuust kiddin'.....

***The voters of California passed a proposition just this past November that will spend billions in bond monies to build a (supposedly) high-speed rail line from San Francisco to Los Angeles. Sure. With all my credit card debt I owe, I ought to just run out and buy a brand-new Ferrari! Makes about as much sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Still in the same spot...
2,125 posts, read 2,773,538 times
Reputation: 1502
I would be remiss (since I'm in rep point jail at the moment) if I didn't acknowledge Lake Junkie in this thread. She and I have been in City-Data land long enough for me to know that I could recommend her in a hummingbird's heartbeat to anyone considering a real estate purchase in the Branson-Hollister-Kimberling City area. What you see is what you get with Lake Junkie, and I have never seen her do anything except tell it like it is in these forums. There are City-Data strictures preventing real estate agents from getting an unfair advantage over others by crassly using the forums to drum up additional business.

Ozarksboy has legitimate concerns ("I'm from California, and this is how we've always done things there" ), but LJ has my complete support. Though I've been in CA for over 22 years, I've never bought coffee for myself at Starbucks, and don't even drink coffee, period. (But my green tea is helping me with my high cholesterol and triglycerides....)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Unread 01-17-2009, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Big Lake Alaska
24 posts, read 36,235 times
Reputation: 24
Well, being born and raised in Alaska, I understand a bit of all these views. Almost nobody here is FROM here, they're all from somewhere else and I've watched our small town grow from a place where everyone smiled as you passed and stopped when you broke down at -30 degrees to a small city where you hardly see friends you know and a smile is even harder to find. That said we are still alot friendlier than say, Seattle and we LOVE our coffee shops here! I am looking forward to spending my retirement years in Marceline, from what I have seen so far, it is beautiful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $74,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Missouri

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top