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Old 01-17-2009, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Rolla, Phelps County, Ozarks, Missouri
1,066 posts, read 1,564,768 times
Reputation: 1180

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Well, all right, then. I guess I can't talk any of you folks out of moving here.

One of the professors at our technological university here in Rolla told me that the Ozarks region is the last beautiful rural area with still-affordable land. He said it would eventually go the way of the other regions as more people discover us. Land prices will go higher and higher, as they are doing now.

Tambre says you're coming here in droves from all over the country.

I guess I'll just have to shrug and try to make the best of it.

Welcome to Missouri, even those of you who are brimful of good ideas to make our lives "better."


The NEW Ozarks Boy


P.S. Northbayeric, I never doubted the honesty, integrity or ethical behavior of Lake Junkie. It is the nature of her work that drives up the price of land, but what the heck, everybody's got to make a living somehow, so I wish her the best.
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Old 01-17-2009, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Branson-Hollister-Kimberling City
1,801 posts, read 3,505,764 times
Reputation: 1517
Red face Thin skinned, I guess...

Sorry, all. Didn't mean to cause an uproar. It felt like a personal attack, but it's easy to mis-interpret things in print. It's also easy to be bold when you're writing with a screen name...

I appreciate that this forum exists...and applaud all of the hard work of all the moderators to try to keep the peace and still allow rational free speech!

Thanks, northbayeric and others who have PM'd me...I do wear my heart on my sleeve.


...although I can't resist saying the idea that realtors cause higher taxes is just silly. Property values rise because of inflation & because every seller wants a profit, whether he's a FSBO or has the help of a professional. The values are determined by supply and demand, like any other commodity. It's all about what the market will bear! The New York architect would be well advised to make sure that property is worth $4,500 in 1994, by looking at comparable properties!





Is it spring yet?

[img]http://******************/nature-smiley-5397.gif[/img]
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Old 01-18-2009, 10:41 AM
 
Location: The City of St. Louis
938 posts, read 2,302,901 times
Reputation: 738
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarksboy View Post

One of the professors at our technological university here in Rolla told me that the Ozarks region is the last beautiful rural area with still-affordable land. He said it would eventually go the way of the other regions as more people discover us. Land prices will go higher and higher, as they are doing now.
Which professor are you talking about, out of curiosity?

I personally don't see land prices or populations exploding in the more rural sections of the Ozarks any time in the foreseeable future. Most of the region lacks one thing that people need to move here - jobs. In my hometown, for example, the only really decent jobs with good pay and benefits, which you need to live a normal middle-class American life, are being a teacher, an engineer at the local MoDOT district (which hasn't been hiring in years and likely won't besides to replace people who retire), or a highway patrolman (a hard job to get to start off). Thats really about it, and the town is blessed with 2 more state agencies than most similarly-sized towns in the Ozarks are. Other than those state jobs, there are a few factories you can work at, where you might make $13 an hour after 5-10 years of employment. With the exception of people moving to the area to retire, the region really can't grow very fast because there simply aren't any jobs.

Portions of the Ozarks closer to Springfield/Branson and St. Louis likely will continue to grow as those areas increase in population, but the areas further removed will grow at a much slower rate. I'd love to live in the Ozarks again myself someday, but the lack of any jobs in my field will keep me away. The closest I can get is St. Louis, or possibly a job in Springfield, but even the market there is pretty poor.

Land in the Texas Hill Country, an area somewhat similar to the Ozarks running from about Waco down through Austin and San Antonio, and the westward to Del Rio, costs around $5,000 an acre or more in many areas. However, most of the Hill Country is within 90 minutes of Austin or San Antonio, which are filled with high-paying jobs, and people are buying weekend and retirement estates everywhere. Others endure hour commutes. Billboards on all the highways offer places like "Canyon Spring Estates - 5 acre lots, from the 300's". I have no desire to see the Ozarks turn into that, ever, but luckily the Ozarks aren't located in a state with 20 million people, half of whom live in flat, sterile, concrete cities like Houston or Dallas and head to the Hill Country to try to get some outdoor experience.
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Old 01-18-2009, 11:11 AM
 
415 posts, read 762,633 times
Reputation: 312
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarksboy View Post
Well, all right, then. I guess I can't talk any of you folks out of moving here.


Tambre says you're coming here in droves from all over the country.

I guess I'll just have to shrug and try to make the best of it.

Welcome to Missouri, even those of you who are brimful of good ideas to make our lives "better."
Thank you, ozarksboy, for having the courage to put your words out there - even though it's the last thing most of them want to hear. I and many others do appreciate it (and agree!).

Reps to you!

Thanks also to ShadowCaver for allowing differing points of view to be represented here.
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Old 01-18-2009, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,501 posts, read 3,846,985 times
Reputation: 1512
Default New Wave

Silvermouse, just so you know, I agree with (and chuckle at his dry sense of humor) much of what Ozark Boy says, and it does take courage to tell the truth. We newcomers do have our "what we think is important" list. It's not always best to bring it with us. Sort of like when my mother-in-law used to come to my house, and tell me the "right" way to do things. It's annoying and condescending.

Social change, people moving to the area, and growth are inevitable. (unless there is some major disaster that reverses population growth). I don't want to see the Ozarks become a big suburb between West Plains and Springfield, either. The way to prevent that is through the local planning boards. It's not beneficial to start snubbing newcomers. That's just unfair and I resent it.
We are looking for a better way of life, including, lower taxes, less regulation by government, more community involvement, and a more peaceful way of life. In other words, we are much like you. Don't forget the golden rule.
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Old 01-18-2009, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Rolla, Phelps County, Ozarks, Missouri
1,066 posts, read 1,564,768 times
Reputation: 1180
Quote:
Originally Posted by tambre View Post
The way to prevent that is through the local planning boards. It's not beneficial to start snubbing newcomers. That's just unfair and I resent it.
We are looking for a better way of life, including, lower taxes, less regulation by government, more community involvement, and a more peaceful way of life. In other words, we are much like you. Don't forget the golden rule.
Tambre, most outstate counties resist voting in planning commissions because they see it as additional regulation. As more people move to rural Missouri and population density grows, some counties will have to change, stop resisting and adopt a more progressive stance. Perhaps this is where you and other newcomers can become involved in your new communities, using your experience in other states or large cities or suburbs to show rural folks how the benefits of countywide planning and zoning will lead to a more peaceful life.
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Old 01-18-2009, 04:00 PM
 
Location: The City of St. Louis
938 posts, read 2,302,901 times
Reputation: 738
Quote:
Originally Posted by ozarksboy View Post
Tambre, most outstate counties resist voting in planning commissions because they see it as additional regulation. As more people move to rural Missouri and population density grows, some counties will have to change, stop resisting and adopt a more progressive stance. Perhaps this is where you and other newcomers can become involved in your new communities, using your experience in other states or large cities or suburbs to show rural folks how the benefits of countywide planning and zoning will lead to a more peaceful life.
Some counties aren't growing much at all. In many rural Missouri communities I'd say a much, much larger problem is that the population is more or less dying off, and due to the lack of decent jobs, young people like myself have moved away and can't come back. Using my hometown as an example again, the statistics show that 27% of the population is 65 or older and 26% of the population lives below the poverty line. Nationally, only 13% of the population is over 65, and 12% of the population lives below the poverty line. That is double the national demographics. The actual population of the town peaked around 2200 in the 1970's and is currently at 2100-ish. Not a lot of growth.

In the case of my hometown, Californians moving in and complaining about there being no Starbucks within 90 miles aren't a problem. The real problem is that the town dying out and slowly evaporating due to a lack of any job creation and the fact that young people have to leave for the cities to find work. The only people that remain are the elderly, who too will be gone in a few decades.

Part of the problem was an anti-growth city council that the town had through the 1980's which actively tried to keep businesses from locating to the towns. They wanted to keep it a small town forever. Industries and retail ended up locating in neighboring towns instead, which have seen modest but small population and job growth. Luckily things have changed a little bit and there has been some job creation in the town in the past decade, but the former dream of keeping the town small forever may just be strangling it completely out of existence.
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Old 01-18-2009, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,501 posts, read 3,846,985 times
Reputation: 1512
Ozarks Boy,

I get your sarcasm that once again, a newcomer is going to try and show rural folks how to do things. Sorry, that is just my opinion of the most logical way to ensure that any population growth is directed in a way that the local people feel their quality of life has been preserved. How would you propose to direct the tide of population growth in rural areas (besides telling people to stay away or live in the cities)?

I certainly wouldn't want to come in as a newcomer and start telling people what is best for them. Just "suggesting " a possible way, that local people themselves could preserve what they cherish.
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Old 01-18-2009, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Branson-Hollister-Kimberling City
1,801 posts, read 3,505,764 times
Reputation: 1517
Cool Agree to disagree?

Silvermouse & Tambre...ditto...ditto...ditto!

I also enjoy reading and chuckling over some of these posts. I have opinions on both sides of the issue, and have always liked a friendly debate!
Ozarksboy is not alone in his stand on this, although he is much more eloquent than many! (I'm occasionally not sure when he's throwing around that dry sense of humor, tho...)

I've always had friends on "both sides of the aisle"...I think we can get narrow minded and stuck if we aren't willing to listen to other opinions.

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Old 01-18-2009, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Branson-Hollister-Kimberling City
1,801 posts, read 3,505,764 times
Reputation: 1517
Cool Good point...

Quote:
Originally Posted by OA 5599 View Post
In the case of my hometown, Californians moving in and complaining about there being no Starbucks within 90 miles aren't a problem. The real problem is that the town dying out and slowly evaporating due to a lack of any job creation and the fact that young people have to leave for the cities to find work. The only people that remain are the elderly, who too will be gone in a few decades.

Part of the problem was an anti-growth city council that the town had through the 1980's which actively tried to keep businesses from locating to the towns. They wanted to keep it a small town forever. Industries and retail ended up locating in neighboring towns instead, which have seen modest but small population and job growth. Luckily things have changed a little bit and there has been some job creation in the town in the past decade, but the former dream of keeping the town small forever may just be strangling it completely out of existence.
I know a place that has had this mentality for a long time. They are beginning to slowly realize that the "no growth" policy is really a negative and there is something to be gained by managing the growth instead!


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