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Old 01-20-2010, 01:58 PM
 
Location: I love the Ozarks
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Default Earthquake in Missouri!

Historic Earthquakes

After hearing the news about Haiti, I cant help wondering....
How many people know ,"The New Madrid Earthquake" was one of the worst earthquakes in U.S.history.
Scary Huh?

Okie
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Old 01-20-2010, 03:54 PM
 
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Yelp and I feel it could happen again any time soon.

hillman
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Old 01-21-2010, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Missouri
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I had no idea. Interesting to know, thanks for posting.
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Old 01-21-2010, 05:55 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
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If it were to happen again , most of the buildings wouldn't collapse , they are built with Earthquakes in mind, a few Years ago the Mississippi River Bridges were Earthquake proofed, i beleave a few are left. The New Railway routes will sit on Earthquake reducing beds , or designed to move with the land. You guys out there should be fine, Earthquakes happen everywhere in the USA, mostly small. But they happen even in Places you don't expect, like Upstate New York , parts of my State. A few years ago we had a few days of small Earthquakes, 3.0-5.0.
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis, MO
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There was a small earthquake 2 years ago in Indiana, I believe, that I felt in St Louis. It was around 4 or 5 AM though, most people slept through it. I was up studying for a big exam

Obviously not a catastrophic one like the one back in the early 1800s, but still--good to realize it could happen here too.
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Where Trolls get BBQ'd
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I know about the New Madrid fault line. I remember reading a marker at a rest area some years back.
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:47 PM
 
Location: The City of St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
If it were to happen again , most of the buildings wouldn't collapse , they are built with Earthquakes in mind, a few Years ago the Mississippi River Bridges were Earthquake proofed, i beleave a few are left. The New Railway routes will sit on Earthquake reducing beds , or designed to move with the land. You guys out there should be fine, Earthquakes happen everywhere in the USA, mostly small. But they happen even in Places you don't expect, like Upstate New York , parts of my State. A few years ago we had a few days of small Earthquakes, 3.0-5.0.
Actually, most buildings in the area that would be affected by a New Madrid Seismic Zone earthquake (Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, and Tennessee) are not built with earthquakes in mind. Notable exceptions include most larger buildings built after the 1970's and many large bridges which have been retrofitted. Unreinforced masonry buildings (URM's), which are buildings built of bricks or cinderblocks without any reinforcing steel, are very susceptible to earthquake damage. URM buildings are brittle and inflexible, and prone to collapse during an earthquake. Much of Memphis would look like Port-au-Prince does right now after a 8.0 on the New Madrid, and many buildings in St. Louis would also have problems. The areas most at risk are low-lying floodplains close to the river. The soil conditions can amplify earthquake shaking, causing more damage. Other upland areas built on bedrock or strong soil will experience less damage. The bottom line: Most of Missouri will be fine, while Memphis would be completely destroyed. Cape and most of the bootheel would experience the worst damage.
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Old 01-21-2010, 08:16 PM
 
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Well its been active last few days.

SLU Earthquake Expert: New Madrid Fault - KTVI (http://www.fox2now.com/news/morningshow/ktvi-earthquake-expert-bob-herrmann-012110,0,4325533.story - broken link)

hillman
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Old 01-21-2010, 08:45 PM
 
Location: South St Louis
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In St Louis, the risk of a real catastrophe from a major earthquake of the New Madrid fault is huge. The potential for a disaster of enormous proportions does exist.
To begin with, the St Louis area lies firmly within the danger zone, just upriver from the likely epicenter. More New Madrid Seismic Maps
Second, a large percentage of buildings in St Louis are composed of brick or masonry, which is just about the worst kind of structure to be in during a quake. Relatively few buildings in the area were designed and built to withstand an earthquake.
And third: Let's say that a major quake severely damages the infrastructure of St Louis on a long-term basis-- meaning gas lines severed, electric lines down, bridges and overpasses down, etc. If this would necessitate a full-scale evacuation of the area, St Louis would be in even deeper trouble. That's because the nearly 1.4 million residents of St Louis City and County would no longer have access to the approximately 16 river bridges which would provide escape routes to the outlying counties. Believe it or not, there's only one major artery in and out of the city/county area which does not cross a bridge (Route 100, or Manchester). Remember the mass evacuations in Houston and New Orleans before Katrina? Well, try to imagine hundreds of thousands of St Louisans trying to evacuate the area on a single road. 'Nuff said.
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Old 01-21-2010, 09:54 PM
 
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In the same way that Haiti is more known (until now) for hurricanes than earthquakes, the Western Ky./ Eastern Missouri/ Western Tenn./ Eastern Ark. area is more known for tornadoes than earthquakes, but the largest earthquake recorded in lower 48 states was along New Madrid Fault, and causes Reelfoot Lake in west Tennessee to be created from backwater from Mississippi River, which, by the way, ran backwards, as did the nearby Ohio River near Paducah. Yes, less than 2 years ago a moderate size earthquake shook Louisville, Ky., and nearby Indiana and eastern Illinois area. Eastern Ky. has a small fault along Pine Mtn., near Virginia line, and central Ky. fault near Winchester, Richmond, and Sharpsburg, and a branch of New Madrid Fault, I think, runs along Ohio River up from Missouri toward Indiana, source of mentioned quake. If New Madrid Fault once again shook like it did in 1812, let's just say Memphis, Tenn. and possibly St. Louis would be no better off than Port-au-Prince, not only that, western Ky. has Kentucky Lake and Barkley Lake right there together, 2 of the world's largest manmade lakes...if their dams were to bust, everything from there to New Orleans would be flooded bigtime (also with Wappapello Resevoir and other lakes nearby adding to water, Memphis and New Orleans might look like Hurricane Katrina all over again, being underwater and all).
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