U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Montana
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-02-2010, 09:16 AM
 
Location: western montana
214 posts, read 529,171 times
Reputation: 86

Advertisements

Actually, I've been guilty of looking at these roadsters to buy, too, here in Montana, mostly as a summer car. The Audi TT would fit in well here because it has AWD. I see a few of them in the summer driving around western Montana. Personally I like the older SLK's, but they have a bad reputation for maintenance issues. The assembly lines over in Europe have been very well documented as having labor issues and cause some workers to sabotage the assembly process. This is why Mercedes has moved some of their assembly plants elsewhere. Europe has had pay, benefits issues, and strikes at their auto plants for quite awhile and this in return causes the unusual maintenance problems - that we don't find on our cars here in the US. Plus I found, at least with the SLK, that most of the people outside the state that were selling them were crooked. This is due to the fact they have a very high trade in value and quite a few of them were wrecked, obused, or stolen. The fraudsters will get them cheap from unnamed sources and sell them at their current value which makes for a quick buck you can't get with a regular used car. Anyway, Click and Clack brothers say to buy 2 Suburu's for the price of one Mercedes and your miles ahead if considering a new one. I'm still waiting for Suburu to come out with a good two-seater roadster. Substance over style?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-02-2010, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,571,634 times
Reputation: 2952
Europe being somewhat more "advanced" in its slide into unionized socialism, I'm not surprised they're having those problems. It's been a long time since I looked closely at what's coming across the pond in autos. However it's been SOP for decades for European livestock breeders to dump their culls on America cuz those faraway fools will pay a premium for anything "imported", and I think that mentality is not exactly unique.

It does make me wonder how much of the "quality control" issues attributed to American auto makers, during their sharp decline of a couple decades ago, was actually union malice rather than inherent issues.

Fix It Again, Tony!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2010, 12:29 PM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 11,870,919 times
Reputation: 3535
Rez if you move back to Montana and run for any political office I will not only vote for you I will campaign for you too. Did I mention that I think all the states should have "right to work" laws ?
As far as "The Montana Lifestyle" goes, there isn't one. In other words there are as many so called "lifestyles" in anyplace as there are people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2010, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,571,634 times
Reputation: 2952
Appreciate that, and I agree with you. No previous employer should have the right to keep you out of work in your chosen field. Contract with you not to reveal trade secrets, sure, that's the same as keeping faith for any reason, whether by contract or a handshake deal. But prevent you from working to keep someone else from using your expertise -- that's wrong, and destructive to everyone.

BTW right-to-work comes up on Another Forum fairly often, and many people pipe up with "I crossed that BS out of my contract and the employer didn't argue". Not one who spoke of this had been shown the door instead.

Lifestyle is "how we live". As you say, ain't something set in stone. But an unforgiving climate does tend to nix uninformed or wrongheaded lifestyles, if only by keeping the tow truck busy all winter.

Hey! if we tell n00bs what they ought to drive to be safe on Montana roads, are we hurting the tow truck driver's "right to work"?? Hmm. Maybe we should just let 'em drive their BMWs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2010, 03:55 PM
 
Location: western montana
214 posts, read 529,171 times
Reputation: 86
The first job I got out of high school in the early '70's, and before I went on to college, was working for Ford's engine plant back in the rust belt, since I grew up there. As you older people know on this site, it wasn't uncommon for a young kid to work for a fortune 500 company right out of high school if you grew up in a big city. I don't remember anyone in my graduating class ever talking about working in retail or restaurant work like younger people do today. Most people got real jobs right away. Now you have to go to college just to work at McDonalds! I never thought about it as a career because there's always a lay off around every corner. I was only there a little over a year and they started getting rid of people due to the gas crises. Remember that?

Assembly line work is very dull and many see psych's,.... that the company would pay for,... from time to time. I've actually seen workers freak out right on the line or get injured. One kid had his finger cut off working right next to me, getting it caught in a hopper. Back then you could smoke tabacco, pot, or drink beer at your station, I doubt if that was company policy, but they did. Remember, their was no such thing as quality assurance or quality control like there is today. The UAW was very strong and you could easily circumvent an order from your foreman by just calling a steward over. Now those jobs are all automated or roboticly run. I don't miss it!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2010, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,571,634 times
Reputation: 2952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbechtel View Post
The first job I got out of high school in the early '70's, and before I went on to college, was working for Ford's engine plant back in the rust belt, since I grew up there. As you older people know on this site, it wasn't uncommon for a young kid to work for a fortune 500 company right out of high school if you grew up in a big city. I don't remember anyone in my graduating class ever talking about working in retail or restaurant work like younger people do today. Most people got real jobs right away.
That's because in the Olden Days, there was more Real Work to be had. Jobs that actually made products to sell, that real people used in their everyday lives.

Now those products are all made in China, and our kids either mark time in college and hope to get a white-collar job once out of school (but most of those nowadays are in advertising or marketing, which isn't a "real" product) or wind up forced to take a service job for lack of anything better (remember, "service" has the same root as "servant").

I don't see this as progress, and I think has produced more stress than all the boring assembly-line jobs combined. (And yes, I've worked assembly-line.)

Now get off my lawn!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2010, 07:51 PM
 
Location: western montana
214 posts, read 529,171 times
Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
That's because in the Olden Days, there was more Real Work to be had. Jobs that actually made products to sell, that real people used in their everyday lives.

Now those products are all made in China, and our kids either mark time in college and hope to get a white-collar job once out of school (but most of those nowadays are in advertising or marketing, which isn't a "real" product) or wind up forced to take a service job for lack of anything better (remember, "service" has the same root as "servant").

I don't see this as progress, and I think has produced more stress than all the boring assembly-line jobs combined. (And yes, I've worked assembly-line.)

Now get off my lawn!
Now put that bolt in that hole until lunch break and after that,..... put that bolt in that hole, understand!!!!!!!( I hope the Chinease kids enjoy it)

Last edited by Jbechtel; 08-04-2010 at 08:30 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-04-2010, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,571,634 times
Reputation: 2952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbechtel View Post
Now put that bolt in that hole until lunch break and after that,..... put that bolt in that hole, understand!!!!!!!( I hope the Chinease kids enjoy it)
Prolly more than American kids enjoy flipping burgers and doing maid work in tourist hotels....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2010, 10:43 AM
 
540 posts, read 1,087,072 times
Reputation: 547
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjnative View Post
Interesting. I'm wondering about self-presentation, though- are people judged negatively for driving a luxury vehicle and wearing "dress casual" in Montana?
This is not looking like a good match. You're really this worried about this sort of thing?

Quote:
I'm also wondering about work- does one have to do blue collar, physical, or outdoor work? What if one does white collar work, i.e. sits indoors all day? No respectability deserved because sit-down work isn't viewed as "real" work?
I doubt it. But to fit into certain crowds, you're not going to have the "in" that you would if you were blue collar. Same thing goes for working anywhere else. In major metropolitan areas, if you show up at the "in" bar and are obviously blue collar, you're not going to fit in or be accepted. At all. You can expect some of the same in an area where most are blue collar workers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2010, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,540 posts, read 12,571,634 times
Reputation: 2952
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMartel2 View Post
This is not looking like a good match. You're really this worried about this sort of thing?
That may be a good point -- if someone worries about fitting in (as contrasted to asking "what's it like there in MT?"), is that kind of like "if you gotta ask the price, you can't afford it"...??
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Montana
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:51 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top