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Old 10-06-2011, 10:44 PM
 
18,852 posts, read 31,751,871 times
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Our last dog, Sam, was a puppy Corgi, Bassett mix. I was out at a farm, and commented on the puppies, the farmer looked at me, and said, "Yep, I going to have to shoot those puppies, can't get rid of 'em". Of course, I was horrified, and immediately picked Sam and put him in the car.

I wonder if he really meant that, or saw me as a "mark"? I was not planning on getting a puppy that day.

He was a great dog. Chased kids for hours.
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Old 10-07-2011, 05:29 AM
 
Location: Phenix City, Alabama
225 posts, read 246,657 times
Reputation: 186
Let Bruno on chain all day and all night last night. Fed him but basically ignored him. No loving and cuddles and playtime. (He decided to destroy a potted plant and chew up the flower pot) when I was picking up the mess he wanted to play... I fussed at him told him BAD DOG ..He tried jumping up on me to get me to play me and using his paws to try to pull me to him to play. I stood up said NO and turned my back. He tried going in front to do same... I again said NO turned my back to him. He stopped.. looked at me and had this WTH? look on his face. I moved again to try to pick up the mess and he again tries to jump up.. again I push him away say NO and turn my back. He looked so sad.. saw his toy.. picks it up and drops it at my feet. I pick the toy up.. place it way up high. Give him his food, tell him to eat.. I walk into house. Look out window and he is still sitting there with a "WTH just happened" look on his face. I kinda felt sorry for him but at same time he has to learn.
When I went to back door to look out window ... he usually jumps up at the door.. This time he just lay there and wagged his tail.
I think he is getting the point. Like I said.. he is smart dog and learns fast. Dont need him jumping up on people. My mom is 66 and her balance isnt good. Plus she is on blood thinners.. dont need bruises and scratches or any falls caused by an undisciplined dog. Or a broken hip.
He is good in the house, though.. one thing I did do was teach him to ring a bell when he has to go potty.
I put a bell on 1 door and everytime I took him out to potty I would ring the bell. Then I started making him touch the bell with his nose (had to hold his muzzle first few times and make him touch it) then say OUT or Potty. Only ring it for potty. Not for walks. When I came here I brought the bell with me and put it on mom's back door. She gets a kick out of the fact that he can ring a bell to go out. ( I did get that part right LOL).

Will definitely get a different collar as soon as I can. I have a flat collar with a buckle! I just remembered. I call it his dress up collar because it has a bandana attached. (I wanted him to look cool) LOL.
I dearly love my dog and I will do everything I can to help him become a better dog. Thanks soooo much for the awesome advice.

EH.. so glad to hear that your foot is getting better. I wish you all the best. Keep up the awesome healing process!!!
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:42 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
6,258 posts, read 12,923,112 times
Reputation: 3435
Ma, I will assume you know about the wildlife in the area? Might be a consideration with chaining your dog.
When I am in your area I usually see kennels where there is protection on all side and tops.
Welcome, keep posting!
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:46 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
6,258 posts, read 12,923,112 times
Reputation: 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Yep, that's the spirit. Discipline isn't about punishment (tho punishment can be part of it, if necessary), rather, it is about consequences. Pull on the leash and the consequence is that the crazy human turns around and goes the opposite direction (be sure to leave the leash LOOSE so there's lots of room to make his mistake!) and suddenly the dog gets pulled up short and finds himself pointing the wrong direction, while the human goes somewhere else entirely and is already 10 feet away. Pretty soon the dog believes you are a lunatic who can't be counted on to walk in a straight line, and is watching you closely, from the only position that's safe -- next to your knee. And if he's not paying attention or tries to crowd you, don't be afraid to turn sharply into him, knee to the head -- HE is supposed to watch YOU. It is NOT your responsibility to watch him. And your space is sacred. The human never gets out of the dog's way. (Some get real clever about walking in front of the human, if they know the human won't trample them.)

And remember, loose lead (if you have trouble remembering that, loop the handle thru a sturdy belt and put your hands in your pockets, you'll be amazed how the dog reacts!) The habutual tight lead does two things against you: it triggers the "sled dog" instinct, and it telegraphs your every move, so the dog feels free to NOT watch you.

Once you get the message across and he starts responding to you, you can actually have a lot of fun together doing complicated heeling patterns, where the game is for you to lead and him to follow as if glued to your knee, like a mirror dance. -- After I had ten minutes with my sister's unschooled brat, he was doing so well we had competition obedience trainers stopping to watch (we were at a dog show) -- even going backwards in tight circles, he stayed right with me.



That's absolutely the worst of both worlds. It has a lot of "warning time" yet no snap when he hits the end of the leash. You need either a very stiff flat buckle (NOT adjustable) nylon collar, snugly fitted just below his ears, or a choke that just barely fits over his head. The point is that it should not cushion him from his mistakes, nor give him lots of warning like a too-large collar does. Also, nylon lead, not leather, for the same reason.

Aside from not having proper effect otherwise, GSDs have a tendency to back out of the collar when they want their own way, so it really does have to be snug.

If you have too much trouble at first you can use a pinch collar, mainly it makes it easier for someone who doesn't have real strong hands or good body balance (when he hits the end of the leash going the wrong way, you should balance against that with your body, NOT try to jerk with your arms). But he should graduate from that pretty quick, if you're going the right way.



Yep. Good luck!

And what Seven said too.
Thanks Rez, that means alot coming from you. I will match my doxi right up to your champions...
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:48 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
6,258 posts, read 12,923,112 times
Reputation: 3435
[quote=Timberwolf232;21178225]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Castration has become a substitute for dog training, as it tends to put the male dog into a permanently juvenile mindset.... and when people can't discipline their dog, well, it's easier to deal with a permanent puppy. On the flipside, it also takes something out of them, they just aren't the same in their desire to work, and tend to become more self-centered and less people-oriented. Also, if they were already fearful or aggressive, they often become worse. In short, neutering a dog because it's not well-trained is like painting a house to get rid of termites. It doesn't work.


There are also health consequences, almost entirely negative:
quote]

You should explain that to my ex-wife!
Thanks for the morning laugh!
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:51 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
6,258 posts, read 12,923,112 times
Reputation: 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElkHunter View Post
I once paid for a really good traing a dog. It was 2 weeks long. 2 hours a day. The first week we were not allowed to bring the dog. Second week you brought the dog and demonstrated what you learned the first week. Instrutor would fine tune what you were doing.

I trained Timber to leash. A leash is a real problem. Everybody allows a dog to pull or play in all the space they have. My leash for Timber is only 1 ft long and holds her right at my side. Once she learned all the commads, and the leash was no longer tight I would disconnect the leash and go through the same training. If she screwed up, the leash went back on. After an hour a day, for 2 months, the leash was no longer required.

Dogs, go through a Teenage Revellios stage. At about 10 months, they not listen, ignore commands, etc. Put them back on the leash and take them trough training agin. A couple weeks and they are back to listening.



Foot is progressing fine. It was a serious staff infection. I go in to the VA every Thursday for them to look at it. They said yesterday that they were surprised its healed so much in a short time. But I take off the bandage and soak my foot in hot water and epsome salt, twice a day.
Great news!!

I too am a fan of the short leash.
Once I read, not sure which comedian it was said that what if Aliens came to earth? Who would they think were the leaders? The ones in front of the leash or the ones picking up the poop?
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Phenix City, Alabama
225 posts, read 246,657 times
Reputation: 186
Oh lordy Mt-7.. didn't think about that. I assume you are meaning wildcats and bears???? Being from down south we didnt have to think about that and we didnt live where we had to worry about alligators either. The occasional skunk was my only major concern then. None of that stuff in the Netherlands either. I usually bring him in at night but last night was sort of a "time out" situation to give him time to mull things over. lol Seems to have worked a little as he's quite subdued this morning. Pouting like a child. hahahha
I know I have a lot to learn about this area and the environment here. I welcome any advice and suggestions.
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Old 10-07-2011, 06:59 AM
 
Location: NW Montana
6,258 posts, read 12,923,112 times
Reputation: 3435
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaBonnema View Post
Oh lordy Mt-7.. didn't think about that. I assume you are meaning wildcats and bears???? Being from down south we didnt have to think about that and we didnt live where we had to worry about alligators either. The occasional skunk was my only major concern then. None of that stuff in the Netherlands either. I usually bring him in at night but last night was sort of a "time out" situation to give him time to mull things over. lol Seems to have worked a little as he's quite subdued this morning. Pouting like a child. hahahha
I know I have a lot to learn about this area and the environment here. I welcome any advice and suggestions.
Yes, Your animal could be killed by a number of things.
Also your temps are dipping in the night.
Are you up on your vaccines?
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Old 10-07-2011, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Phenix City, Alabama
225 posts, read 246,657 times
Reputation: 186
Yep, he's had ALL of his shots. He will be coming in at night. Mom said temps not so bad during day on most days but night time he definitely has to be in house. When he is inside he is pretty much well behaved.... most of the time. Cat likes to tempt him a lot LOL
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Old 10-07-2011, 08:11 AM
 
9,341 posts, read 25,511,408 times
Reputation: 4489
Default G'mar khatima tovah

On this Yom Kippur, to those who are fasting, may you have an easy fast; and to everyone: may you and all those you hold dear be written and sealed in the Book of Life for 5772.


G'mar khatima tovah*,

Walter Greenspan

* Hebrew, literally, "A good final sealing", is the common greeting immediately prior to and during Yom Kippur, and means, "May you be inscribed (in the Book of Life) for Good". This year, the one-day Jewish Biblical Holy Day of Yom Kippur (Lev. 16:29-31, 23:26-32) coincides with Shabbat (Sabbath) and will begin before sunset this evening, Friday, October 7, and end after sundown tomorrow, Saturday, October 8, on the civil calendar.
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