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Old 08-09-2007, 03:19 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
8,029 posts, read 14,435,453 times
Reputation: 3612

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Lived in MT 1964-1984... hardly ever saw snakes. Once in a long while I'd find a garter snake out in the sticks. Saw one big gopher snake.

Only saw rattlers once... but made up for lost time... spring of 1974, I was up in the hills north of Three Forks in what's now the park, just walking around... turned over a rock and there must have been 50 rattlers tangled up underneath it. Next rock, same thing!! Whoa, let's not look under any more rocks, I think I found where they all hibernate!!! -- Never saw a rattler in MT before or since.

Here in the SoCal desert... when I lived east of town, I only saw gopher snakes, and lots of 'em. Now that I'm west of town, I don't see many gopher snakes, but I've killed 37 rattlers in the past 5 years (including several in the kennel, in my yard, and on my front porch). Had dogs bit a number of times, usually not a big deal, but one time a young Mojave Green got an old dog square in a vein, and the dog was down in 5 minutes and dead in 15. (Young rattlers will shoot their whole load instead of rationing it, so are more dangerous than old ones. And Greenies' poison is a neurotoxin, so are much more dangerous than other rattler species.)

When I see a rattler these days, I don't get excited, I just get a shovel.
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Old 03-31-2010, 11:57 AM
 
7 posts, read 18,578 times
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I live on North Western side of the Montana
and I hike a huge amount. the Prairie Rattlers are very well camouflaged so I wear very high hiking boots.

[url=http://fieldguide.mt.gov/detail_ARADE02120.aspx]Prairie Rattlesnake - Montana Field Guide[/url]

Adults have a triangular head, blunt nose, narrow neck, and stout body; they range in length from 15 to 60 inches. thats 5 ft long.
Diagnostic Characteristics
No other snake in Montana has rattles (see Gophersnake and Western Hog-nosed Snake). which i have seen here as well.
General Distribution {the purple area is where you find them.}
Montana Range
On same web page as Rattlesnake.

Last edited by ElkHunter; 04-01-2010 at 03:02 PM.. Reason: Copyrighted material
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Old 03-31-2010, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,727 posts, read 20,203,986 times
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That purple pretty much covers the state! I haven't spent a whole lot of time in Montana, but here in NE Wyoming we have more than our share of prairie rattlers, so I'm sure they extend into SE Montana as well, and I've heard of people seeing lots of them down near Yellowstone.

But as for skeeters, WHEW! I've lived in Alaska and done lots of fishing there and in Canada, and mosquito netting is one of the things we never ventured too far into the bush without having, but I've NEVER seen them half as thick as I did when we stopped at the Choteau, MT airport on the way to Alaska 15-20 years ago. They were dangerously thick! It was early to mid-June, and there must have been 50 of those suckers perched on each of us constantly. There was just no way to keep them off of us. We all climbed back into the airplane, closed it up tight and waited for our ride to show up.
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Old 03-31-2010, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Bozeman, Montana
1,191 posts, read 2,869,000 times
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It is a big state, so be aware that there is a very wide difference in local conditions regarding mosquitoes, rattlesnakes, etc.

Even though the map may show a wide area, the elevation, rockiness, etc., makes a big difference in habitat.
Bozeman city limits doesn't attract rattlesnakes, but there are dens of them in places out in the valley away from town, like rock quarries.
Livingston has rattlesnakes even in the city limits and is thick with them in places around the area.
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Old 03-31-2010, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Bozeman, Montana
1,191 posts, read 2,869,000 times
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Here is another map from the Montana state field guide, showing density of observed rattlers.
http://fieldguide.mt.gov/RangeMaps%5...DE02120_FS.jpg
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Old 03-31-2010, 10:09 PM
 
299 posts, read 544,213 times
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Default " Where'd all the snakes go?".....

That was last year.. The snake problems should be over now.. MSU wildlife biologists apparently came up with a clever idea ... and it worked.. They genetically engineered a python to eat other Montana based snakes, then released it last summer .. Well, the snake earned its keep.. It ate all the snakes in Montana..... plus a few head of cattle, a 1973 datsun 240Z, and, unfortunately, the worlds last known pair of albino wolves, who happened to be at the top of the endangered species list .. To save the snake from possible arrest ( and the exposure of their genetic experiment ), the snake was flown half way around the world and air dropped into the wilds of Indonesia ...... where it was seen falling from the sky by local natives who mistakenly thought it was a god coming to bring them good fortune, and promptly captured it, put it in a cage and worshiped it.. ............ Which all goes to prove that some days it just doesn't pay to get up.

Here is a short video of its last known sighting .... 49-foot python captured in Indonesia - World news- msnbc.com

tiberius
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Old 04-01-2010, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Bozeman, Montana
1,191 posts, read 2,869,000 times
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I guess that proves it.... a high protein diet builds muscle!!
LOL
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Old 04-01-2010, 01:27 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 9,143,510 times
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You'll find the largest concentration of snakes in Helena -- E. 6th avenue.
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Old 04-01-2010, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
8,029 posts, read 14,435,453 times
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I see the snake population is meager in Meagher County

Eat more snake, it builds muscle!

I think I shall not look into any large buildings on E.6th Ave.
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