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Old 06-19-2011, 06:40 PM
 
Location: SW Montana
200 posts, read 237,609 times
Reputation: 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
Tad Kachynsky explained "cultural diversity" rather well in his Manifesto. All the "diversity" degenerates to zilch while climbing up social ladder and embracing generic "middle class", lawn moving values. 18 years old is too young to understand that black/yellow & purple people of equal social/wealth standing with you have just about the same "culture" as yours because their goals (and most importantly "opportunities") are about the same. USA is extremely uniform country cultural "diversity wise" (don't let variety of skin colors to fool you) because you got to, you absolutely must conform in order to have a chance on climbing up the corporate ladder (or staying afloat and fed). American "culture" nowadays is centrally created and distributed by a handful of "entities" to passive consumers. No diversity there. The remaining "diversity" is not really diversity but social class/income differences. For example, "cultural" differences between Montana Indians living on reservations and Kentucky trailer park dwellers are too miniscule to discuss. I believe you've got plenty of social class differences in Montana to explore, that's all the diversity you'll get.

Montana's stereotypical identity was forged for better or worse by active "cultural agents" not by passive consumers of entertainment and dining choices. That's maybe why people cling to that legacy regardless of them being your average American of a corresponding tax bracket. Anyway, you should realize that your longing for entertainment and amusement doesn't fit well with "diversity". Why? Because, nation of diversity consumers don't create diversity
Very well said.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Motown
323 posts, read 678,442 times
Reputation: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by WyoEagle View Post
I lived in Montana for 16 years so I think I can say plenty about it. I actually do like Billings but I've never lived there. I did live in Bozeman when I went to college. It is a good college but the two recommendations I give to anyone is to live and work on campus all four years. Bozeman is a very pretentious, anti-student town. I couldn't wait to get out of there. I stayed an extra year in Montana after that and moved in 2007 and haven't looked back since. I left because the wages were absolutely dismal and the cost of living was horrendous. The mentality was that you should be grateful to live in Montana and you sacrifice to live there. I don't mind some sacrifice but I didn't take a vow of poverty when I graduated from college. The main reason I have left is this mentality. This state is romanticized way too much not only by people from out of state but by the residents. They like to think it's such a unique place to live when in reality it isn't that special. So there is my rant and I'm sure I'll be offending some people here.
Cost of living is high anywhere in the Rocky Mountains within an hour driving distance of a Wal-Mart. But having lived many other places in the United States - I think it's worth it. I'm originally from the Midwest (Michigan) and have lived in Illinois, Florida, Colorado and Montana. I left Montana (after two years) last fall for family reasons, and at the time I was really excited to leave. I was excited to get back to the cultural diversity of a large Midwestern city, all the awesome big city entertainment, the cheap sushi deals, the stylish people, the "worldly" people, the sports games, the cheap airfare, etc.
Now I'm in a big city and have realized the following:
For all the benefits of cultural diversity, it often means a huge hike in crime because there are more people. Bad crime. Big city entertainment is expensive and it gets old going to the same venues all the time being surrounded by all the "too cool" scenesters. The worldly and stylish people of the city really just have us all fooled - and themselves - they're not any more interesting than anyone else. Sports games are expensive. And I don't make enough money or have enough time off to fly anywhere on vacation anyway.
Traffic sucks. Crime sucks. And everything gets old after a while anyway. (I would miss the cheap sushi, though most the time it's not THAT much cheaper than $15 a roll - maybe $12)
Regarding the lack of jobs in Montana - my husband and I were quite fortunate. Being an outdoorsman (guiding all types of game hunts and Montana outdoor sports), he was making great cash in every season - with plenty of time to take off. I was able to find work doing whatever - with enough time on the side for all of my hobbies (music, painting, writing, hiking, camping, traveling, etc). We personally had WAY more money when we were living in Montana than we do now. There are so many additional costs to living in the city. The majority of things we enjoyed doing in Montana were free.
Living in Montana - we had the vacation time (never underestimate how awesome a "mud season" can be - out of town) and saved cash up to go to a few exciting destinations a year (festivals on the West Coast, winter jaunts to warm places) rather than spending it going to mediocre shows and having mediocre times several nights per week in the city.
Now we have "rewarding" and well-paying jobs in the city and all we can talk about is how we can't wait to move back out there so we can actually live in our own vacations. It took me getting away to realize it.
I'm a bit older though (28) and I can't say I would ever want to live in Billings. Not sure I'd really want to go back to Bozeman either - but my point is, some of the worst things about Montana are also the best things. And one person's paradise is another's hell. And this isn't a dig on the city I'm at right now - it's just a dig on city life in general.
That being said ... a wise man once told me ... "Wherever you are, there you are."
Montana isn't perfect ... for everyone.

Last edited by electric_lady; 06-21-2011 at 11:28 AM.. Reason: typos
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
2,745 posts, read 2,140,532 times
Reputation: 3459
Excellent post electric_lady.

Don't it always seem as though, we don't know what we got till it's gone..They pave paradise, put up a parking lot. (verse from some old song from the late 60's I think )

I always had deep roots in Montana, but wanted to see what else was out there. So I traveled the world for 8 years on the Uncle Sam Plan.

I found out that what I had here was everything I ever wanted or needed, so I returned to Montana much wiser for having seen something else, and having developed a deeper appreciation for what was right under my nose all along.
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
3,512 posts, read 3,050,693 times
Reputation: 3160
Quote:
Originally Posted by electric_lady View Post
Cost of living is high anywhere in the Rocky Mountains within an hour driving distance of a Wal-Mart. But having lived many other places in the United States - I think it's worth it. I'm originally from the Midwest (Michigan) and have lived in Illinois, Florida, Colorado and Montana. I left Montana (after two years) last fall for family reasons, and at the time I was really excited to leave. I was excited to get back to the cultural diversity of a large Midwestern city, all the awesome big city entertainment, the cheap sushi deals, the stylish people, the "worldly" people, the sports games, the cheap airfare, etc.
Now I'm in a big city and have realized the following:
For all the benefits of cultural diversity, it often means a huge hike in crime because there are more people. Bad crime. Big city entertainment is expensive and it gets old going to the same venues all the time being surrounded by all the "too cool" scenesters. The worldly and stylish people of the city really just have us all fooled - and themselves - they're not any more interesting than anyone else. Sports games are expensive. And I don't make enough money or have enough time off to fly anywhere on vacation anyway.
Traffic sucks. Crime sucks. And everything gets old after a while anyway. (I would miss the cheap sushi, though most the time it's not THAT much cheaper than $15 a roll - maybe $12)
Regarding the lack of jobs in Montana - my husband and I were quite fortunate. Being an outdoorsman (guiding all types of game hunts and Montana outdoor sports), he was making great cash in every season - with plenty of time to take off. I was able to find work doing whatever - with enough time on the side for all of my hobbies (music, painting, writing, hiking, camping, traveling, etc). We personally had WAY more money when we were living in Montana than we do now. There are so many additional costs to living in the city. The majority of things we enjoyed doing in Montana were free.
Living in Montana - we had the vacation time (never underestimate how awesome a "mud season" can be - out of town) and saved cash up to go to a few exciting destinations a year (festivals on the West Coast, winter jaunts to warm places) rather than spending it going to mediocre shows and having mediocre times several nights per week in the city.
Now we have "rewarding" and well-paying jobs in the city and all we can talk about is how we can't wait to move back out there so we can actually live in our own vacations. It took me getting away to realize it.
I'm a bit older though (28) and I can't say I would ever want to live in Billings. Not sure I'd really want to go back to Bozeman either - but my point is, some of the worst things about Montana are also the best things. And one person's paradise is another's hell. And this isn't a dig on the city I'm at right now - it's just a dig on city life in general.
That being said ... a wise man once told me ... "Wherever you are, there you are."
Montana isn't perfect ... for everyone.
Your story is not typical of many people I know in Montana who struggle to make ends meet. By the way, I do agree with you on the city life being something I would not want to have. I moved to Wyoming (which isn't much different) and it has made a world of difference. You have the same benefits of living in Montana but much better wages and the people here don't romanticize it.
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Old 06-23-2011, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Motown
323 posts, read 678,442 times
Reputation: 173
When you say better wages in Wyoming - for what kind of work? And whereabouts? Why is it so much different from Montana in that regard? I'm just curious - I'd never heard that and I don't know much about Wyoming except it has the lowest population and I love driving through it for that reason!
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Old 06-23-2011, 11:11 AM
 
Location: on the road to new job
324 posts, read 298,249 times
Reputation: 179
Pobbles: Montana is a much better state than some surrounding it. It has diversity, no not as much as Madison or Chicago, but you've got clean air and water and lots of wide open spaces to make your own mark. if you dislike the state so much, why would you apply to UM? If you want to broaden your horizons, then look to Brigham Young, Univ Minnesota, Univ Colorado, Colorado State, Univ Oklahoma or another larger university.

I lived in Kalispell area for ten years before taking a job in NM. I sorta missed it, but NM has better opportunities and pay scale. Wyoming and Montana lack the pay. You can't eat the mountains.
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Old 06-23-2011, 11:13 AM
 
Location: on the road to new job
324 posts, read 298,249 times
Reputation: 179
Pobbles: Vacationing in Fla and living there are vastly different. IMHO - Fla sux! It's too da*n hot and there's the storm danger everywhere.

Disasters lead to search for 'Safest City, USA' - US news - Environment - msnbc.com
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Old 06-23-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
17,643 posts, read 22,118,757 times
Reputation: 10746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawknest View Post
Pobbles: Montana is a much better state than some surrounding it. It has diversity, no not as much as Madison or Chicago, but you've got clean air and water and lots of wide open spaces to make your own mark. if you dislike the state so much, why would you apply to UM? If you want to broaden your horizons, then look to Brigham Young, Univ Minnesota, Univ Colorado, Colorado State, Univ Oklahoma or another larger university.

I lived in Kalispell area for ten years before taking a job in NM. I sorta missed it, but NM has better opportunities and pay scale. Wyoming and Montana lack the pay. You can't eat the mountains.
Diversity? I hate that term. No, in Wyoming, we do not have diversity. We have neghbors, we have friends, we have family. We judge people by their merit, not by the color of their skin. So NO, we don't have diversity, we just have folks.
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Old 06-23-2011, 02:23 PM
 
4 posts, read 3,458 times
Reputation: 15
I am not from Montana, nor have I ever lived there. My husband and I come from Washington DC and reciently have lived in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, and I have lived several other places besides. I came to this site to get an idea of what Montana is like living there from the perspective of the people living there already.

To the origional poster, please believe those of us who have posted, when we say that it really isn't all that to live in a large city. It is nice to have the chance to see things like museums, major productions like plays and musicals, art. But you can't live your years in these places. It took not long after experiencing the DC Sniper murders (a block away from our house), anthrax being put in letters, 9-11 was a huge factor in us moving, constant threat of car-jackings. Then put in the sky high cost of living and driving on the roads there.

A good way to see other places in the world and the USA is to join the military. It isn't for everyone, but you can see other cultures and get paid for doing it. I left home at 18 for the ARMY and will never regret it, one of the best decisions I ever made.
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Old 06-23-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
4,696 posts, read 7,308,542 times
Reputation: 3454
Quote:
Originally Posted by dragon102 View Post
I am not from Montana, nor have I ever lived there. My husband and I come from Washington DC and reciently have lived in the eastern panhandle of West Virginia, and I have lived several other places besides. I came to this site to get an idea of what Montana is like living there from the perspective of the people living there already.

To the origional poster, please believe those of us who have posted, when we say that it really isn't all that to live in a large city. It is nice to have the chance to see things like museums, major productions like plays and musicals, art. But you can't live your years in these places. It took not long after experiencing the DC Sniper murders (a block away from our house), anthrax being put in letters, 9-11 was a huge factor in us moving, constant threat of car-jackings. Then put in the sky high cost of living and driving on the roads there.

A good way to see other places in the world and the USA is to join the military. It isn't for everyone, but you can see other cultures and get paid for doing it. I left home at 18 for the ARMY and will never regret it, one of the best decisions I ever made.
I just moved here from West Virginia a year ago. Used to live along the Opequon Creed in Inwood (along the confluence of Threerun creek and the Opequon )
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