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Old 03-03-2007, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Great Falls, Montana
529 posts, read 1,728,432 times
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Public Schools or Homeschool
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Old 03-07-2007, 01:40 AM
 
989 posts, read 3,126,676 times
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I teach high school at a public school. I've had the opportunity to be around a number of young people who were home schooled for part or all of their education. I would say about half are very bright and above most of the "public" kids, and the other half are way behind. Much of their success is dependant on the parents (moms) intelligents. You notice I didn't say parents education, I said intelligents.

As for the socialization... We always hear that home schooled kids are not well socialized. I have not found this to be true. I have found them to be naive, but they seem to fit in very well.

The story a previous poster told about parents getting involved in their kids college stuff is plain scary, and a bit freaky. Not a part of it that I would ever be exposed to so I can't comment on that part.
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Old 03-07-2007, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Larkspur, CO
189 posts, read 714,675 times
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There are pros and cons to homeschooling, but when people play the "socialization card" against it, they are really showing their lack of intelligence (note spelling) about the whole matter.

Some parents do overly protect their children when they homeschool, which might lead to a lack of preparedness to deal with the world.

But on the other end of the spectrum, look at the fine students that are coming out of public schools where the parents have ZERO involvment. Kids with no respect for adults, tattoos, piercings, everything provided for them by mom and dad, never had a job, never earned anything.

This obviously doesn't describe every kid that comes out of public school, but I use this example to make my point. Plenty of socially inept kids are coming out of the public schools, but you never hear any mention of it. To be anti-homeschooling solely because of socialization issues is hypocritical.

The bottom line is that parents need to mold their children into productive citizens nomatter what type of education they choose.
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Old 03-07-2007, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Medford, Oregon
29 posts, read 152,135 times
Reputation: 18
I agree with mthawki and was thinking the same exact thing. Public/private school turn out some shinning individuals. Many graduate with top honors, extra-curricular activities, success in sports, etc. Many also graduate at the bottom of their class with poor grades, lack of respect for most teachers, if not all adults for that matter, and as said above, poor socialization skills.
Note fully taken on intelligence.
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Old 03-07-2007, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Larkspur, CO
189 posts, read 714,675 times
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Oregon,

There will always be people that oppose things like homeschooling just because it's different. They have no first hand knowledge other than heresay, institutional studies or site rare cases of problems as the norm.

Unlike public schools, it's very difficult for a homeschooled child to just "skate through" their education. More and more colleges are gladly accepting homeschool graduates because they know they have the academic ability to succeed and have the desire to learn.

Again it's up to parents to guide their kids and prepare them for adulthood. But fewer and fewer parents of publically educated children really seem to care or are interested about what their kids are learning and how they will handle the "real world."
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Old 03-07-2007, 12:22 PM
 
989 posts, read 3,126,676 times
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I guess its not very intelligent of me to post at 2:40 am. oops.
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Old 03-07-2007, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Larkspur, CO
189 posts, read 714,675 times
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What are you doing up at 2:40am? LOL
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Old 03-07-2007, 12:33 PM
 
989 posts, read 3,126,676 times
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I don't have a problem at all with home schooling, I applaud the parents who are willing to step up to the task. Its a big job and very time consuming.

A neighboring school district has a science fair each year and the kids who have been winning it lately are the home schooled kids. They get a great deal of support from home and they are excited about their education.
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Old 03-07-2007, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Nashville, Tn
7,916 posts, read 16,754,191 times
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Alot of you seem to be assuming that a teacher doesn't need any formal training or credentials judging by some of the posts I've read. I have strong feeling on this subject since my sister has a masters degree and has dedicated her life to teaching. Would any of you accept the services of a lawyer, doctor or any other profession who didn't have proper training or experience? Of course not. Teaching is a career that many people have studied and prepared for and yet there are those who think they can just pick it up without any preparation whatsoever and instruct their own children in a variety of subjects just because they have a fear of public schools. I'm sorry but something is really wrong with this thinking. Teachers are required to have a solid academic foundation and they usually find a specialty such as math, science, english, or whatever. The point I'm trying to make is that a parent who wants to teach their own child is simply not qualified to do the job unless they've actually earned those academic credentials. I suspect that very few of them are really qualified for the job.
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Old 03-07-2007, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Helena, MT
373 posts, read 1,702,128 times
Reputation: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by MontanaGuy View Post
Alot of you seem to be assuming that a teacher doesn't need any formal training or credentials judging by some of the posts I've read. I have strong feeling on this subject since my sister has a masters degree and has dedicated her life to teaching. Would any of you accept the services of a lawyer, doctor or any other profession who didn't have proper training or experience?

Teaching is a career that many people have studied and prepared for and yet there are those who think they can just pick it up without any preparation whatsoever and instruct their own children in a variety of subjects just because they have a fear of public schools. I'm sorry but something is really wrong with this thinking. Teachers are required to have a solid academic foundation and they usually find a specialty such as math, science, english, or whatever. The point I'm trying to make is that a parent who wants to teach their own child is simply not qualified to do the job unless they've actually earned those academic credentials. I suspect that very few of them are really qualified for the job.

We're never going to win here, Montana Guy. I like your zeal. My whole issue with the system is accountability. I do not show a lack of intelligence when I say that home school students have socialization issues. Instead, I'm speaking from personal experience through several years of interacting with home school grads. Sure, not all have issues. However, I've personally seen plenty who do have issues; sometimes their parents have more issues! It's not the kids' fault. It's all about how much their parents got them involved with other kids. Until you've been on the receiving end of the results of that education, you don't know what the norms are.

What's this about not wanting to site (sic) institutional studies [it's "cite;" they teach you that in public school]. Just throw things out there based on emotion and conviction alone! Don't use research studies or interview experts in the field. Is that your pedagogy as you are homeschooling?

During my academic advising and admissions career, I evaluated student transcripts and placement tests. I'm now a part-time college professor, and I know that home school students usually aren't prepared for my classes--especially because I teach communication. I have to waste the other students' time because the home school parents never made their kids do any MLA citations or outlines. They've never had to speak publicly in front of peers. Or, have I somehow, through a sheer battle against the odds, met only the exceptions to the otherwise glowing examples of home school outcomes? It's possible.

I just think homeschool families are trading the benefits of teachers' professional training and expertise for more one-on-one involvement with their kids. That's fine. That's acceptable. Own up to it though! Your desire to be close to your kids is great. However, would you act as your own lawyer or perform surgery on your kid? Teaching is a profession! I really take offense at folks who don't think that educators care or that we can't do our jobs. However, if your goal is to teach your kids moral values or to spend more time with them, please do so. However, don't claim that you can do the same level of teaching without specialized training, or in many cases, any college at all.

I had a student who taught herself from 8th grade on, as her mom quit school in 8th grade and then later homeschooled her daughter for religious reasons. The daughter (my student) struggled so hard in college;it made me so sad for her and just disgusted that something like that was allowed. Her mom subjected her to that lack of teaching ability, and the student is still catching up. So, all I am asking is that if you want to teach, please just get the appropriate credentials before you start. Or, teach your kids only up to the grade level that you reached.

I was also thinking about my childhood today. I can't even imagine what it would have been like not to go to school with the other kids. It made who I am. All my memories of growing up center on my friends, my teachers, the halls, the playground, our walk to and from school, etc. I can't imagine what my life would be like now if I had never gotten to experience any of that. My mind can't even comprehend it. I am so blessed for the wonderful small town school experience I had growing up. I wouldn't trade a thing. I can count some of my teachers as the most positive influences on my life. Thanks, teachers! You gave me the breadth of insight to allow me to learn who I was. Thank you, thank you, thank you for the push toward self-reflection and inquiry. Can you think of your childhood without thinking of school? My childhood was great!

Last edited by lorelei2873; 03-07-2007 at 09:47 PM..
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