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Old 11-08-2009, 09:12 PM
 
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In the Butte area the going rate for delivered, split, dry lodgepole is $100.00 a cord. I am selling my neighbor a cord for $70.00, however.
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Old 11-09-2009, 01:16 PM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 11,869,550 times
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The price per cord always varies greatly depending on the type of wood, the condition of the wood (knots, rot, etc.) and whether or not you want it in rounds, just simply split, or completely chopped up and ready to burn. I prefer to burn Larch and Douglas Fir, and Lodge-pole pine for various reasons. The larch is easy to split across the knots and larch has very few knots anyway. Fir may sap up your flue but is easy chop and easy to find in large diameters as green blow-down. Lodge-pole pine is plentiful and easy to chop but you seldom find really fat ones and when you do they are knotty. Lodge-pole is great for building log cabins with.
I built the fence below with lodge-pole pine for the posts and poles from trees I cut down on a Forest service "pole permit" (restricted by diameter not length) and the larch shake panels I split by hand from trees I cut on a firewood permit, (restricted by length but not by diameter) I had so much "firewood" that I diverted some of it into fencing material. I built the six foot high fence to keep my dog in and she leaped right over it ! Oh well at least it's pretty, the lower panel is cast in place concrete and there are no nails or screws in the fence (excluding the gate), all slot and tang with routered grooves for the fitting. See firewood isn't just for fires anymore if you stretch the rules a bit.
My favorite type of wood stove for heating is an airtight "Franklin Fireplace" type.


Last edited by Rickers; 11-09-2009 at 01:24 PM..
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Old 11-13-2009, 02:11 PM
 
Location: SW Montana
352 posts, read 1,004,651 times
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The cheapest I've seen it around the Gallatin Valley is $125/cord, and I see an advertisement for hardwood at something over $200/cord. Either that's a tree service or someone has a source of hardwoods around here. Would love to burn hardwood, but over two hundred a cord borders on what I can heat with the boiler for. Mostly the average seems to be about $150-$175/cord.

I still cut some on forest service, but travel a bit; last time I took a load out of here I got stopped and told that my lengths were out of spec and they were going to confiscate my load and fine me $150. Told me I was just going to take the stuff and sell it for fencing. After I pointed out that what I had was a)dry, b)mostly snags and knotted up stuff, and c)mostly barkless and only a fool builds fence from dry bark-off wood that's all twisted up he said, "okay I'll let you go this time, but..."

So I made an extra effort to find a landowner that had a beetle problem and offered to do a nice clean job of thinning. That works out much better, is closer, and I don't have to sweat some college boy lecturing me on how to cut wood. I don't get riled all that often, but that one set me off.

Cutting your own involves some time, but I figure I now have about time and $20-$25/cord into wood getting every year. As I used to log some, equipment wasn't a problem. I log maybe ten hours a year putting in about 3 1/2 cords, which is a bit more than I need. And from listening to some of the neighbors talk concerning their utility bill, the savings are considerable. And several years ago I found a nice used Quadrafire that has the re-burn system, so I'm putting out minimal particulates downwind. It does throw a lot of heat per cord of wood.
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Old 10-16-2010, 09:44 AM
 
1 posts, read 4,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjb123 View Post
I believe in a previous thread someone had commented that firewood in MT is expensive. I'm wondering what a cord of firewood costs in your area? And does that include delivery, if it's already split, etc. Just wondering...

I live in southaven Mississippi and i sell split cords of wood for $150 and that's with delivery...
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Old 10-16-2010, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,523 posts, read 7,779,851 times
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Keep in mind that a "cord" of wood in the round will NOT be a full "cord"!
A full "cord" is 4X4X8 feet, stacked with little air space around the pieces.
Lodgepole and spruce are easy to split (usually), but they both burn very quickly. Fir is a little better, but tamarack (western larch) is the best. When I lived in Northwestern Montana I cut my own wood, but here it is too far to drive to make it feasible. If I wanted wood heat these days, there is no doubt in my mind I would go with a pellet stove. the pellets are not all that expensive when bought by the ton, and you load it once a day and forget it. No concerns about bringing bugs in with the wood, no splitting to do, no messy wood yard.
My chain saw is used for tinkering these days, and my big single bit axe has been hanging on the wall in retirement for several years.
I think I'll keep it that way!
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Old 10-18-2010, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
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Not sure where you are looking to live, but in Helena, you can get cut, split, and delivered for anywhere from $75 a cord to $150.
Most of it will be either lodgepole pine, (burns hot and fast) or Ponderosa pine, (lots of resin and creosote).

The farther from the forests you are the more expensive it gets as I have seen it advertised from Big Timber to Columbus anywhere from $150 to $200 a cord, not always split but usually delivered.
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Old 10-18-2010, 02:30 PM
 
Location: NW Montana
451 posts, read 845,846 times
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It seems the OP (2006) of this thread still lives in Ohio. But the question is still valid, as are some of the answers.

The price of fire wood in Montana depends on many factors. It seems to me that those factors which most profoundly effect the answer to that question fall into this order:

1)Who is doing the gathering, cutting, splitting, stacking?
2)Specific location?
3)Type of wood?
4)Quantity?

By the way, in the Mission Valley, at just about any time of year, you will find trucks/trailers loaded with cut (some even split) firewood and 'Wood 4 sale" signs on them parked in various locations around the towns. (Think parking lots).

This way you can inspect the load, phone the owner, and make arrangements that way. Done properly it is an excellent way to see what you are getting before you pay for it.

FWIW, YMMV

monty
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Old 10-18-2010, 06:45 PM
 
5,792 posts, read 9,256,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redraven View Post
If I wanted wood heat these days, there is no doubt in my mind I would go with a pellet stove. the pellets are not all that expensive when bought by the ton, and you load it once a day and forget it. No concerns about bringing bugs in with the wood, no splitting to do, no messy wood yard.
We had a discussion about types of heating last year over on the ID forum, and somebody brought up a good point about pellet stoves: you need electricity to run them, so in a power failure situation you're stuck without heat. Is that correct? In our corner of North Idaho most people seem to go with wood burning stoves + propane, so that's what we're planning on doing.
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Old 10-18-2010, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
11,820 posts, read 15,435,170 times
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Yeah- you need a supply of electricity for a pellet stove- for the auger and blowers.

We're thinking of a pellet stove for our house here, and I think in an emergency I would use a gas generator outside with an extension cord.

It's a tough call- we always heated with wood stoves in WV, but we don't have a chimney in current house and if we did install a woodstove in the basement family room we would have to haul a lot of wood through the house down the stairs. That pellet option looks better and better, lol..

Plus we had all hardwoods in WV- I'm not sure how much more pine would be needed to burn an equivalent BTU here. BTW- a cord of hardwood in WV runs 125-150 depending on supplier. Not sure exactly, cause I cut and split my own.
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Old 10-18-2010, 11:40 PM
GLS
 
1,985 posts, read 4,837,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Fork Fantast View Post
We had a discussion about types of heating last year over on the ID forum, and somebody brought up a good point about pellet stoves: you need electricity to run them, so in a power failure situation you're stuck without heat. Is that correct? In our corner of North Idaho most people seem to go with wood burning stoves + propane, so that's what we're planning on doing.
Although I am not a fan of pellet stoves, most manufacturers have removed this defect by offering a battery backup that lasts a couple of days, when hopefully your power will be restored.
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