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Old 12-07-2007, 04:07 PM
 
Location: LEAVING CD
22,952 posts, read 22,448,772 times
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Just got home from Missoula, saw many hippie dippies there yesterday.
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Old 12-07-2007, 04:24 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 4,220,627 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimj View Post
Just got home from Missoula, saw many hippie dippies there yesterday.
Don't let them fool you. They may dress the part, but they all drive 2007 Nissan Xterras that their dad bought them with his last paycheck from Haliburton.
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Old 12-07-2007, 05:24 PM
 
152 posts, read 484,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by truckingbronco View Post
Don't let them fool you. They may dress the part, but they all drive 2007 Nissan Xterras that their dad bought them with his last paycheck from Haliburton.
Oh my gosh, I thought I had gotten onto the Oregon site! I thought you were talking about the portland area
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Old 12-08-2007, 12:37 AM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
6,237 posts, read 15,405,055 times
Reputation: 8098
I just love these threads, and the way people generalize about a whole state. Do any of you realize how big California's population really is? 35 million! One of every seven Americans is a Californian. Not all 35 million of us think the same way - not even close. To generalize by watching a TV show is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard.

I've lived in L.A. County all my life. I'm a renter, because I could never afford to buy a house on my paltry salary. I watch TV maybe once or twice a week; most of it is useless drivel. Yes, I see women around here who have been nipped and tucked until they look like plastic caricatures. But not all of us are like that. I'd die before I'd fall for the Botox trap, for example!

I can't argue with what some of you are saying about the demise of western Montana. I think it's sad that so many people have retired there, and made farming an impossibility by driving up the land and housing prices. But please stop this tiresome mentality that every Californian is evil, and is just dying to buy up a huge parcel of land for their new McMansion.

If ever moved there, I'd probably settle in a decent sized city, hopefully buy a condo or a small house with my 401(k) money, and that's it. Even a 4-bedroom house would be too much space for me! Not every Californian is about excess. Please judge everyone as individuals, not as a group of "those people".

Last edited by ElkHunter; 12-08-2007 at 04:08 AM..
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Old 12-08-2007, 04:42 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 4,220,627 times
Reputation: 1002
Quote:
Originally Posted by SandyCo View Post
I just love these threads, and the way people generalize about a whole state. Do any of you realize how big California's population really is? 35 million! One of every seven Americans is a Californian. Not all 35 million of us think the same way - not even close. To generalize by watching a TV show is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard.

I've lived in L.A. County all my life. I'm a renter, because I could never afford to buy a house on my paltry salary. I watch TV maybe once or twice a week; most of it is useless drivel. Yes, I see women around here who have been nipped and tucked until they look like plastic caricatures. But not all of us are like that. I'd die before I'd fall for the Botox trap, for example!

I can't argue with what some of you are saying about the demise of western Montana. I think it's sad that so many people have retired there, and made farming an impossibility by driving up the land and housing prices. But please stop this tiresome mentality that every Californian is evil, and is just dying to buy up a huge parcel of land for their new McMansion.

If ever moved there, I'd probably settle in a decent sized city, hopefully buy a condo or a small house with my 401(k) money, and that's it. Even a 4-bedroom house would be too much space for me! Not every Californian is about excess. Please judge everyone as individuals, not as a group of "those people".
Reread the thread, with the exception of maybe a post or two, no one was making blanket statements about Californians.
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Old 12-09-2007, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Huntsville, Alabama
339 posts, read 1,048,998 times
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My summer trip to Montana was wonderful. This time I stayed on the eastern side of the state - and went on a 3 day trail ride with some 300 other people. Has any one else been on the Culbertson Trail ride - I think this was its 42 year.
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Old 12-13-2007, 10:58 PM
 
Location: SW Montana
352 posts, read 1,004,504 times
Reputation: 239
Quote:
Central Montana was the main place that looked like what I was expecting Montana to be like. There was some beautiful country out there that didn't have a log cabin vacation home every 50 yards. Do yall think that in 20-30 years that central Montana will fill up like Western montana has? I hope it doesn't because i'd like to retire out there someday.

I was disappointed by western Montana. It felt more like a tourist trap than Montana. I might be able to get a good job with a company that is located in Bozeman, but i'd have to rent a place for years until i built up enough equity and the housing market corrects itself (if ever). However, i don't see a major correction happening in the real estate market around Bozeman because most of the people moving in have already made their money so they aren't affected by economic shocks as much as the rest of the country.

Is Bozeman a good place for a man in his early 20's to settle down and start a family? I spent 3 days in Bozeman back in July and I just didn't think that i fit in too well with the 20's crowd there. Lots of hippies, people with tattoos, etc (not to make judgement, just not my style). So is there any significant amount of single women in Bozeman that are ready to settle down? Would the best place to look for them be at church? Thanks for your replies.....
What you saw as far as people in their early twenties was only partially representative of Bozeman. What you didn't see were the people who are in their twenties and out busting tail on different jobs to pay the bills. There are a bunch; I know, I work with a lot of them. They don't, repeat don't, have the time to stand around downtown by the coffee shops and hangouts. To be sure, they have their downtime, but it's usually out getting in mountain or lake time, not being sidewalk ornaments. They socialize just fine other places; the net is a busy place to arrange everything from road trips to do this and that to meeting for a beer or movie someplace.

According to one 25 y.o. gal I work with, the guy situation in BZ is comparable to a lot of places. There are, according to her, a surplus of guys and, according to her, if you're a gal out there searching "the odds are good, but the goods are odd". Obviously you're going to meet a different class of person in church than down at the Rockin' R bar. I am a long way past when I dated and hung around much with a young single crowd, but I think one thing you might be prepared for is there is a lot of women whose idea of settling down might mean only skiing 30 days instead of 60. Both genders are keenly aware that there is always the possibility of finding a decent meal ticket; best to be cautious of golddiggers.

Again, I'm showing my age, but the people I work with say it's way easier to hook up with the advent of FaceBook, MySpace, and the like. You can spend more quality time getting in with the right crowd to begin with. And, odds are you'll be bunking with someone to afford to live right in Bozeman and that should lend itself to putting a foot in with a network of people.

Have fun, and make sure you have your job lined up before you make the move. There's a gob of jobs around here, but not all pay the best. Be aware that the college crowd can soak up housing in a hurry, too. And don't worry too much about the renting part - all of us who went ground-up here paid dues to stay. Be smart, learn the ropes and put more than one iron in the fire. The simpler the better to start.
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Old 12-15-2007, 02:51 PM
 
17 posts, read 48,789 times
Reputation: 13
Rangerider: Thanks for your reply, you brought up several points that I hadn't thought about. It makes sense that the more serious, business focused mid 20's people wouldn't be hanging out in the coffee shops and street corners all day.

The only way i will be moving to Bozeman is if I get a job offer from this company that is located there. They are growing pretty rapidly so we'll see if they have a spot for me in a few years once i'm done with grad. school.

My plan would be to rent a one bedroom apartment for a couple of years until I get married and/or start getting raises from the company. Or, depending on how my financial situation is after grad school, it might be more financially worthwhile to buy a small condo and sell it when i want to move into a bigger place. But that assumes that the real estate market will be steady or rising in that timeframe. Buying a small condo in '09 and selling anywhere from '12-'15 or so... who knows how that would turn out.
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Old 12-15-2007, 02:58 PM
 
17 posts, read 48,789 times
Reputation: 13
Sorry that i offended some of yall with my Californian remarks. I was just upset with how expensive things are in western Montana and was looking for some reason to blame.

My choices on where to live after grad school are probably going to be: Chicago, Bozeman, some little town in the Midwest, or back home in Louisiana. If Bozeman had reasonable housing prices i'd view it at the top, but as of now i'd have:
1. Chicago or Louisiana
2. Bozeman
3. some little town in the midwest

This is based on average salary, cost of living, available jobs in my field, quality of life, etc.... i'm getting my masters degree in economics.
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