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Old 12-03-2007, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Sierra Mountains
11 posts, read 26,821 times
Reputation: 10

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The Mongols call yurts "Ghers". They evolved in arid to semi-arid grass lands and desert areas of Asia. Montanahogrider is probably right about their inception in Eastern Mongolia. Yurt is a Russian or Siberian word for these ghers.

Many Asiatic tribes use them and have their own unique designs, (subtle differences). Today, the Magyars of Hungary still make them in the old way. They are made of felt by hand. These do not stand the rain well. But are good in cold weather.

The Mongols still make them and live in them too, but these are usually of canvas. They are designed to be erected or taken down in about three hours. (Depending on their size.)

Tipis shed rain better, but maybe not wind quite as well. The rigid lattice work of a gher makes them very strong. Beautiful rugs are hung inside on this lattice work for insulation.

I hope to be a gher dweller some day.
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Old 12-04-2007, 05:14 AM
 
152 posts, read 379,167 times
Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by DAN 1 View Post
The Mongols call yurts "Ghers". They evolved in arid to semi-arid grass lands and desert areas of Asia. Montanahogrider is probably right about their inception in Eastern Mongolia. Yurt is a Russian or Siberian word for these ghers.

Many Asiatic tribes use them and have their own unique designs, (subtle differences). Today, the Magyars of Hungary still make them in the old way. They are made of felt by hand. These do not stand the rain well. But are good in cold weather.

The Mongols still make them and live in them too, but these are usually of canvas. They are designed to be erected or taken down in about three hours. (Depending on their size.)

Tipis shed rain better, but maybe not wind quite as well. The rigid lattice work of a gher makes them very strong. Beautiful rugs are hung inside on this lattice work for insulation.

I hope to be a gher dweller some day.
Here's to making our own *** milk and stone tools
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Old 12-04-2007, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Kingman - Anaconda
1,433 posts, read 3,557,621 times
Reputation: 555
Thanks for all the comments, yes they are designed for high winds and heavy snow loads.
It would be anchored to insulated concrete stem walls with a cellar to allow for solar componets and well control items.
Our property is at 7,000 ft and already accesable only by snowmobile so it has to be tough.
As for bears, We are on the transit route between Glacier and Yellowstone. Not to many years back a Grizzly was killed and left just below our place on Mill Creek in The Mt Haggin wildlife area. So they do come through.
With standard framing it would be no worse than a convential stick frame constructed house. I have seen the results of bears that have gone through kitchen windows. They exit the same way amazing they can fit through.
So we are thinking wood shutters over the windows with a solid screen door on the main door.
In talking with the company there is another of these in Montana will find out location today.
We are looking at these as they are pre fabbed. We currently can not be onsite to construct our own convential stick frame so we have to find something pre fabbed that a contractor (if we can find a good one) can put together.

So keep all input positive and negative flowing
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Old 12-04-2007, 09:07 AM
 
Location: SoCalif
102 posts, read 181,417 times
Reputation: 85
Fascinating stuff, thanks for sharing. I've always been interested in how people build housing that is defined by the environment and available materials. Spunds as though under all the criteria you mentioned or was implied a yurt has to be on the short list.
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Old 12-04-2007, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Kingman - Anaconda
1,433 posts, read 3,557,621 times
Reputation: 555
Quote:
Originally Posted by TypicalCalifornian View Post
Fascinating stuff, thanks for sharing. I've always been interested in how people build housing that is defined by the environment and available materials. Spunds as though under all the criteria you mentioned or was implied a yurt has to be on the short list.
Yes it has good potential to face south and take in natural heat. Not many windows on the north side. It will be small enough to be able to keep clean and not kill us to keep it heated. The sky light in the roof will allow natural lighting plus during the summer the sun does not set until at least 10pm so not many lights will be required. Plus what there are will all be compact flourescent bulbs. All gray water piped out for watering purposes. Windows and doors will be screened to keep out the Mosquitos and allow for great cross ventilation.
No water wasting tub or dishwaser hand wash dishes and take showers to conserve water.
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Old 12-05-2007, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Slaughter Creek, Travis County
1,184 posts, read 2,504,418 times
Reputation: 925
You'll need to attempt to obtain a building permit because the State of Montana adopts the International Residential Code. Good luck.
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Old 11-06-2008, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Baytown, Texas
12 posts, read 21,302 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickers View Post
It'll get blown to bits by a windstorm or get stolen, vandalized etc. Get a cheap, pile of junk (but comfy) trailer and be happy with it. What ever you put on the place, if you don't show some evidence of attendance except for a week or so of habitation each year, some dead ender or young tweeker couple on a last stand may squat in it and run a meth lab or something. I had a piece of property near Noxon that had been in my family for 40 years that was occasionally used by drifters once in a while.
Hi,
Would you still own the property? Thank you
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Old 11-06-2008, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Montana
1,219 posts, read 2,048,106 times
Reputation: 635
Heh heh... When I saw the thread title I thought a yurt was some kind of wierd *** or something..

I think I have seen a few of those out and about, just never knew what they were called. Looks like a cool little structure.
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Old 11-06-2008, 07:50 PM
 
Location: SW Montana
352 posts, read 711,335 times
Reputation: 226
Had an acquaintance that lived full time in one, put it up beside a friend's house so he could make use of the bathroom, kitchen, etc. It was in the trees, sheltered well, but took a lot of wind and snow load. He had it set up really well and wintered just fine. They are really an amazing design, work every bit as well as a teepee and in some cases better.
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Old 11-10-2008, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
6,488 posts, read 7,615,710 times
Reputation: 1996
So did you ever get your yurt? If so, how's it working out?

There was a yurt house for sale east of Bozeman not long ago, except it was raised up off the ground like a giant mushroom rather than down on or in the ground like a normal yurt. Looked like a neat place, but I'll bet those floors were COLD in the winter!

I've known people who lived in traditional-type (built from whatever was laying around) yurts and teepees year-round in MT -- they're actually fairly comfy once the snow piles up around 'em.

I used to pile snow all around and over my trailer in winter -- made a huge difference in how warm it was inside!
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