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Old 12-03-2007, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Kingman - Anaconda
1,416 posts, read 3,448,126 times
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Default Yurts in Montana

We are looking at a solid wall Yurt from Oregon Yurtworks to be built on our property near Anaconda.
Is there anyone who has one of these and if so how is it working out?
Ours primarly would be a summer vacation place and closed up for the winter.
Any thoughts or ideas?
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Old 12-03-2007, 08:01 AM
 
Location: In The Outland
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A tepee might be cheaper. I think I would buy a camper trailer as it will already have a bed, stove, heater and a toilet already in it.
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Old 12-03-2007, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
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I had never heard of a Yurt so I had to google it and learn. I didn't read much into it but how's the insulation and how sturdy are they? Will they hold up to a Montana Winter?
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Old 12-03-2007, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Kingman - Anaconda
1,416 posts, read 3,448,126 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ElkHunter View Post
I had never heard of a Yurt so I had to google it and learn. I didn't read much into it but how's the insulation and how sturdy are they? Will they hold up to a Montana Winter?

The site we are exploring is

Oregon Yurtworks - State-of-the-art modular round homes

R 38 2x6 or 2x8 framing and will acommidiate the 90lb roof load requirments. So it sounds very much like the ticket. No canvas tarps wrapped around lattice work on this one.
plus it can be dryed in in about 5 days as it is pre built in the factory in Oregon.
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Old 12-03-2007, 05:08 PM
 
Location: In The Outland
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It'll get blown to bits by a windstorm or get stolen, vandalized etc. Get a cheap, pile of junk (but comfy) trailer and be happy with it. What ever you put on the place, if you don't show some evidence of attendance except for a week or so of habitation each year, some dead ender or young tweeker couple on a last stand may squat in it and run a meth lab or something. I had a piece of property near Noxon that had been in my family for 40 years that was occasionally used by drifters once in a while.
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Old 12-03-2007, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Lambs Book of Life
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I've never heard of a yurt before. When I saw the first pictures that came up from the website, I thought it was one of those homes that's built into the side of a hill. Kind of like a hobbit house. Now those intrigue me.
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Old 12-03-2007, 08:04 PM
 
Location: In The Outland
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Holy smokes I just looked at those guys website ! I thought you were talking about a traditional yurt ! Those are faux rich persons foo foo vacation palace yurts. Very nice I must admit. Must be nice ! If I could afford to have one of those for a weekend place
I'd be one happy old codger !
A traditional yurt is meant to be dismantled and moved along with the herds of goats or sheep from summer pasture and then down to winter pasture.
I think it originated in some steppes of Mongolia or some where by some nomadic folks.
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Old 12-03-2007, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Spots Wyoming
17,629 posts, read 22,060,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rickers View Post
It'll get blown to bits by a windstorm or get stolen, vandalized etc. Get a cheap, pile of junk (but comfy) trailer and be happy with it. What ever you put on the place, if you don't show some evidence of attendance except for a week or so of habitation each year, some dead ender or young tweeker couple on a last stand may squat in it and run a meth lab or something. I had a piece of property near Noxon that had been in my family for 40 years that was occasionally used by drifters once in a while.
I'm like you. So far in what I read. One good ole Montana breeze and psssssst. Yurt home gone. We get used to those breezes and some times we even welcome them.
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Old 12-03-2007, 08:16 PM
 
152 posts, read 372,187 times
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Default the funny little hut

As some of you know I am not native to montana so of course I know what a yurt is (oregon is always first in the weird deparment) the parks have them. You can rent them as an overnighter, the ones they used were cedar I think to slow down the rotting process. The novelty is a see thru dome that on the one night a year there are no clouds you can see the stars.
They were comfortable and warm and dry. I always thought of it being very medieval or viking like, but with the modern concept of soap and water. Have you ever seen a clovis house? It is like a yurt sunk into the ground a few feet. This might work in a low water table area. I know a real nerd am I not? please do not stone me
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Old 12-03-2007, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Lala Land Montana
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It seems like a lot of folks here don't know what a yurt is. It was designed and developed about 5000 years ago on the stepps of eastern Mongolia. It can and does withstand highwinds the cold. Thats why the round shape, so the winds will just mold around it instead of destroy it. They are very sturdy. A friend of mine lives in one he had put up 25 years ago and it is still standing strong. And that is in Paradise valley. High winds and bitter cold.

But I don't think it will give you much protection from the hungry Grizzlely Bars.

Last edited by montanahogrider; 12-03-2007 at 09:49 PM.. Reason: cause I needed to.
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