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Old 03-14-2014, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,550 posts, read 12,663,787 times
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Parasites of rabbits

Most of 'em ain't seasonal. So ... it was good advice but based on a bad premise. And a lot of these are direct contagion, one rabbit to another... seasonal doesn't make sense unless you think internal parasites magically disappear come winter. (Okay, who wormed all the rabbits?) And intestinal worms are not your concern if they don't have a muscle-living component (eg. tapeworms) or unless you eat the guts.

(Geez, rabbits seem to get everything but ascarids.)
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Old 03-14-2014, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
4,963 posts, read 5,854,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Speakin' of rabbits, any problem with tularemia in MT? Saw belly sores on rabbits in SoCal often enough that I never dared eat 'em.
I've never heard of any problems, there are a lot of cottontails around the place in Big Timber. They look healthy but when I process a rabbit I always check for spots on the liver as my best indicator there is something seriously wrong with them.

My parents have shot a few out of the garden and we've fried them up. Haven't noticed any problems, but they are pretty tasty little critters

With any wild game I always look at how the animal acts, it's condition, any obvious signs of problems while alive and while butchering, and at the meat while I am handling it looking for anything out of the ordinary.
Then I cook any wild meat I always cook it through as well to kill any parasites.

I raised rabbits for several years until the neighbors dog killed most of my breeding stock in one night. Still, the meat was great and for a small area, rabbits produce a lot of value.

Last edited by MTSilvertip; 03-14-2014 at 08:07 AM..
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Old 03-14-2014, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,550 posts, read 12,663,787 times
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Yeah, I've thought about raising rabbits... seems to me if you could cross 'em with one o' them lard pigs, you'd really have something!
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Old 03-14-2014, 09:13 AM
 
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It's hard to find wild game tastier then a Fall Cottontail.
My Grand Parents talked often of the early days. Hunting Cottontails and Jack Rabbits.
The Jack rabbits brought a good price in town. Salted down and sent East on the RR.
Thought was, Eat rabbit and grouse and sell the chickens.
They had no choice but to live off the land or leave the homestead. They stayed.
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Old 03-14-2014, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
4,963 posts, read 5,854,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reziac View Post
Yeah, I've thought about raising rabbits... seems to me if you could cross 'em with one o' them lard pigs, you'd really have something!
Well... you would sure need a bigger cage
I raised Flemish Giants that got up to 24 lbs. Nice rabbits, but I had to put in wood floors in the cages because they were so big and heavy they would either go through the wire, or get sores on
their feet.

And before you say it Rez, No that is not a picture of the rabbit in it's cage....


Quote:
Originally Posted by SageCreek View Post
It's hard to find wild game tastier then a Fall Cottontail.
My Grand Parents talked often of the early days. Hunting Cottontails and Jack Rabbits.
The Jack rabbits brought a good price in town. Salted down and sent East on the RR.
Thought was, Eat rabbit and grouse and sell the chickens.
They had no choice but to live off the land or leave the homestead. They stayed.
My family was much the same. They didn't have jackrabbits, but my great grandfather raised huge crops of potatoes that he shipped by traincar loads to the mines in Butte.
Back then, it was a lot of manual labor, so all the neighbors would come to dig spuds when he harvested, and the neighbors would get a bunch of spuds and a a couple bucks for the work.
Lots of the folks in that valley wouldn't have survived without those spuds.

My uncles always spoke of "if you found a deer track you stayed on it until you found it, because it might be the only one you find all season". If they got a deer or an elk, they could sell another calf which might mean the difference between paying the mortgage or not.
One thing they did eat alot of was porkupine because in the mountains you don't have the jackrabbits and cottontails.
The little pine squirrels here are too small to be worth the bullet, and most of the beaver had been trapped out by the mountain men, but the raccoons started moving in about that time so they substituted when they had to.

It was tough times for the homesteaders in this state, they made do with whatever they could find.
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Old 03-14-2014, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
7,550 posts, read 12,663,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSilvertip View Post
And before you say it Rez, No that is not a picture of the rabbit in it's cage....
Hmm. I was thinkin' that rabbit lives better'n we do!
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Old 03-15-2014, 07:54 AM
 
30 posts, read 39,313 times
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MTS, that reminds me of another story my Grand Mother told.
Simple pleasures that are gone forever.

One extra bad Winter there was no money to buy chicken feed. The hens scratched out survival on cattle waste, whatever they could find. Most days it got -0 and a lot colder.
Then one mild day about this time of the year the kids heard cackling in the barn. All raced to the barn to find an egg. WOW!! first egg since Nov. Sure sign of Spring. Life is SOOOOO good.
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Old 03-15-2014, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Where the mountains touch the sky
4,963 posts, read 5,854,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SageCreek View Post
MTS, that reminds me of another story my Grand Mother told.
Simple pleasures that are gone forever.

One extra bad Winter there was no money to buy chicken feed. The hens scratched out survival on cattle waste, whatever they could find. Most days it got -0 and a lot colder.
Then one mild day about this time of the year the kids heard cackling in the barn. All raced to the barn to find an egg. WOW!! first egg since Nov. Sure sign of Spring. Life is SOOOOO good.
Good story
I wonder how many people today would understand the intensity you have watching for the first greenup, so you can start looking for greens because you have been living on canned and salted all winter,(and not much of it) and the first shoots of anything you can eat from dandelion greens, ferns or nettles are picked as soon as you find them because you are so hungry for something, anything, fresh

When I was a kid we still lived a pretty subsistence lifestyle, (still do in some ways), and I remember watching the garden like a hawk for the first peas and the first potatoes that were bigger than a marble that we could take to mom so she could cream them over toast

Our forefathers worked really hard to settle this country, lived through countless deprivations and hardships, but in many ways I think they are happier than we would ever imagine. Simple joys like your egg, or someone catching a fish so they had meat for supper for the first time in a week, that was real joy!

Living close to the land has a lot of hardship and hard work as well as the occasional thrill made even better because it doesn't happen every day.
Today we have everything we need at our fingertips, so nothing is special or amazing,, it just is.

Part of the reason I still have a cabin in the mountains with no running water,(except when you run to the creek with a bucket), no power, an outhouse and wood heat and an old wood range.

Times up there are really special to me because my father and I built it ourselves by hand with logs from the surrounding forest, skidded with my father's horses, lumber cut in our own mill, stone gathered from the mountain behind the cabin, and a lot of sweat and cussing.
We fitted the logs by hand with an ax, outside of using chainsaws and nails, and steel roofing, it's about as rustic as you can get. Even the kitchen cabinets were made by hand by my mother's father 20 years before he died.

Part of what makes it a very special place to me is that my uncle helped us to build it and he worked with us up there until he was 90 years old, and he passed away the next winter just before spring green up.

Ranching and farming are hard work, especially the way our ancestors did it, but I can't think of a better way to live
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Old 03-15-2014, 01:01 PM
 
5,804 posts, read 9,371,489 times
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I love your cabin stories!
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Black Hawk, CO
6 posts, read 8,912 times
Reputation: 15
I'm diggin the cabin stories as well!

So do you think a small hog operation would be better off as a feeder operation or a breeding operation or hybrid of both? I currently don't have any experience with them as my county in CO won't allow any hogs. Special equipment needed for medical care? Any guides on how much they would eat per day as a % of weight?

I'm beginning to see that I'll have to start out doing as much of the homesteading thing as possible to find a niche market and then start to specialize.
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