U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Montana
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-08-2015, 02:08 PM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 984,782 times
Reputation: 721

Advertisements

Seeing im looking at living in northwest montana, i have a question to ask. Being a type one diabetic im dependent on insulin, and am wondering how my fellow t1ds manage it out in the boonies. Due to the seemingly bad job market, i think it would be a not so smart idea to move there, unless i was near a major city (ex: kalispell), but figured id ask as there has to be some around in the sticks near troy. So if you dont mind, how do you manage (not being retired).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-10-2015, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Montana
387 posts, read 362,471 times
Reputation: 678
Since no one has responded, I work in a rural clinic about 2 hours from a big town. For our DM1 patients, they usually drive to the big town a few times a year (every 3 months) and pick up insulin and keep it in their fridge. We write 3 months prescriptions to help with that. We have some in the fridge at the clinic just in case of emergency (we are a small family practice - the largest hospital is about 1.5 hours away). Now, due to cost, many of our patients are switching over either to levemir or to pumps which seem to be easier to manage. Those might be things to speak about with your medical provider before moving. Generally though, it is pretty manageable if you have been stable and well controlled over the past few years. If you are very unstable and have to see an endocrinologist frequently, that is a little harder, as the nearest endo. might be a bit of a drive. We really try to work with our patients, and I think most primary care providers in MT in rural locations also do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2015, 11:37 AM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 984,782 times
Reputation: 721
Thats good to know, sasly i cant say im well manages, but im not badly managed either, just slowly working on getting better with my management which is good. For me my doctos visits just determine a1c, and to get updates on new technology (like the dexcom g4), then once a year i get my eyes screened for retinopathy(correction on spelling probally needed). Overall my biggest concern would be regarding affording insulin/supplys in rural montana, no job=no money = no insulin =death.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2015, 03:22 PM
 
4,757 posts, read 4,046,150 times
Reputation: 9989
People do not move successfully to economically depressed places like Troy without a job in hand, with or without diabetes.

No job=no money.

Actually that goes for pretty much anywhere in the state.

Even if the property was cheap, nothing else will be. Most everything comes in on a truck so it costs more. Small towns have grocery stores with prices on essentials which are typically as high as those found in convenience stores...a min of 3x price than a larger towns. The larger towns have prices on food & furniture & clothing & vehicles & insurance & house construction & utilities that outrage transplants from real cities.

Many people move here and last about three winters. When they leave they are in worse financial shape than when they arrived.
The punchline to the old joke "how do you become a millionaire in three years in Montana" is "start out as a billionaire". That is why people here at CD say, "get job first" before picking a town.

It's a great place, if you have financial resources. If you are broke, I think it would be onerous.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2015, 03:38 PM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 984,782 times
Reputation: 721
Diabeties adds added danger to no job however, it would suck to have no income without diabeties, but with it, its a near gaurenteed death unless you near a low income clinic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2015, 07:02 PM
 
4,757 posts, read 4,046,150 times
Reputation: 9989
I'd say it's unadvisable to move to Montana without a decent bankroll.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2015, 07:09 PM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 984,782 times
Reputation: 721
Thats just common sense...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2015, 07:18 PM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 984,782 times
Reputation: 721
On another topic, what are the hospitals in that area with emergency rooms open 24/7, i dont need to be near a doctor for sceduled checkups, as i am used to a 1.5-2 hour drive to go to a doctor, but in regards of emergency rooms.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2015, 09:25 PM
 
4,757 posts, read 4,046,150 times
Reputation: 9989
Not much.
Kalispell.
Libby has small hospital, but emergency room open 24 hours?

Each county likely has some sort of emergency quick response unit/ambulance service and/or lifeflight service to major facilities like Kalispell or Missoula.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2015, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Montana
387 posts, read 362,471 times
Reputation: 678
The smaller hospitals have emergency rooms, but that doesn't meant that someone is always there. That means that there is someone in charge that is within 20 minutes of the the ER and on call at all times. That is due to how hard it is to staff the ERs in really small places. Larger places obviously have ERs that are staffed all the time. You would really need to be near a place with a community health center that has a sliding scale, or qualify for medicaid/medicare (look for FQCHC or an FQCHC look-alike health center). I would say it is unwise to move to rural Montana unless you are very well managed as a diabetic and have good insurance to cover your meds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Montana
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:08 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top