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Old 03-29-2016, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Montana
387 posts, read 357,657 times
Reputation: 678

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSilvertip View Post
Great area if you're a firefighter.


Maybe this will give you a clearer picture.


http://helenair.com/news/natural-res...1bf6d64a0.html
I would say however, as a health care provider who treats these firefighters, it is pretty darn bad for your health. As professions go.
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Old 03-30-2016, 08:00 AM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
823 posts, read 577,410 times
Reputation: 2253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senah View Post
I would say however, as a health care provider who treats these firefighters, it is pretty darn bad for your health. As professions go.

Many professions are, just like healthcare.


A wild land firefighter positions is meant to be a stepping stone. I have talked to plenty of people who started there, and went on to bigger and better things. It is hard work, in the most challenging of environments. But it teaches teamwork, perseverance, and the ability to stare down a daunting task and conquer it.


I talked to a young man that had applied for many firefighter jobs and couldn't get hired anywhere. He spent one year on a hot shot crew and then got hired the next year full time as a firefighter in Billings. He had previously spent 3 years as a rural volunteer firefighter to get experience, but couldn't find a paying job.


Like I said, it isn't for everyone. But it will open doors.
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Old 03-31-2016, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Montana
387 posts, read 357,657 times
Reputation: 678
I don't disagree with you, but in terms of risks, they are pretty high up there, especially vs. other professions. Even if you compare it to working as a firefighter in a rural or city location, it is much riskier.

The issues I deal with are specifically seeing the quantity of smoke inhalation, as you are fighting fire for long periods of time, and so you can't wear tanks and masks for the duration. This leaves you with chronic respiratory problems early on in life that can affect you for a long time, and certainly can be an issue while you hold that job. The other obvious risks are an aside but definitely can cause problems themselves.
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Old 04-15-2016, 05:57 PM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 976,471 times
Reputation: 721
Doing sopme research on jobs/payments, it seems many jobs (including those that are considered highpaying out east, such as the Information Technology field), seem to pay about 30-50k. Those considered highpaying tend to be about 40-50k, with almost all the others falling much farther short for fulltime jobs. This seems much shorter than what i have been told is needed to "get by" on these forums, as it seems to be stated 60k is the minimum recommended (though that might have been the Alaska Forum, as im branching out alot that its getting hard to keep track).

The few forestry related Careers make in the ballpark of 35-45k a year (assuming year-round work, many seem to have dec-feb off, however many of these were you are gaurenteed a spot back are Salaried, so its not effected).
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Old 04-17-2016, 12:17 PM
 
8,944 posts, read 8,045,001 times
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What you have to consider, is that in Rocky Mountains and Northwestern state where there was so much logging, no longer have logging industry as it had in the past, due to city people wanting to keep trees covering everything when they go on vacation. There is no longer any real logging industry, and a tremendous number of experienced loggers fighting over any job in that field.

The big timber industry is now Canada which has replaced the NW logging industry. Or the South East, where they have not put them out of business yet.
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Old 04-30-2016, 07:21 PM
 
242 posts, read 199,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSilvertip View Post
Most forest jobs in Montana these days are on fire crews since we can no longer manage the forests.
My father was a logger for many years, I worked in the trade for a short time, but outside of a couple large mills that own huge tracts of land privately, and small loggers like my father that still owns a small one man mill and works his own forests, there really isn't a forest industry here anymore.


It basically takes an act of congress to force even small jobs for watershed protection, and those are usually litigated for years.


If you want to work in the forest, while Montana has an abundance of timber, it's basically of no use and left to rot or burn these days.
We can no longer use that renewable resource to produce jobs.
Just get a firewood permit (costs $10 or so), that gets you free wood right there, just make sure it's standing dead wood and you are good to go.
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Old 05-03-2016, 11:02 AM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 976,471 times
Reputation: 721
Statewide atm has lot of jobs open (seasonal/temperary though), but still has a few permenant jobs. Seems in montana being a forester might be bad, but maybe a forest ranger/gis technition (a bunch of the latter around the citys)
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Old 06-01-2016, 10:31 PM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 976,471 times
Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTSilvertip View Post
Most forest jobs in Montana these days are on fire crews since we can no longer manage the forests.
My father was a logger for many years, I worked in the trade for a short time, but outside of a couple large mills that own huge tracts of land privately, and small loggers like my father that still owns a small one man mill and works his own forests, there really isn't a forest industry here anymore.


It basically takes an act of congress to force even small jobs for watershed protection, and those are usually litigated for years.


If you want to work in the forest, while Montana has an abundance of timber, it's basically of no use and left to rot or burn these days.
We can no longer use that renewable resource to produce jobs.


What would those large companys be? I tried googling and all i can find is info stating that logging companys hold most private timberland in montana, but it never says what ones...
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Old 06-02-2016, 08:02 AM
 
3,806 posts, read 3,991,054 times
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The biggest owner of timberland in MT by far is the federal government / U.S. citizens. Plum Creek Timber has been the biggest industrial timberland owner (around 1 million acres?) but they are selling out to Weyerhaeuser (not sure on regulatory approval or closure date). According to sources I scanned 40,000 different private landowners own 3.5 million of the 6 million private timber acres, with a couple handful of big guys (100-500,000 acres of timber and ranch lands). There may be a layer of timber landowners between Plum Creek and private owners that probably own the rest but I can't quickly find their names right now either. Stimson Timber is (or at least was) one. The timberland often changes hands between real estate investment trusts, insurance companies, forest product companies, etc., often for tax game reasons. The state of Montana is another big timber landowner. The Nature Conservancy probably is too in its own way.


See page 5 for the biggest mills http://www.montanaforests.com/catalo...1/file2601.pdf

Last edited by NW Crow; 06-02-2016 at 09:11 AM..
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Old 06-02-2016, 09:57 AM
 
Location: MA/ME (the way life should not be / the way it should be)
1,267 posts, read 976,471 times
Reputation: 721
They already sold out, weyerhauser is managing their maine lands now, and plum creeks website is no more. Thank you for the link. In regards to seasonal forestry jobs there wouldnt be to much of an issue, the lack of jobs would probally come in elsewhere. Atm i think a game plan regarding that would be to start out elsewhere, then 5-10 yrs later switch in to montana.
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